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Out On The Tiles #2 - A Music Rewind Livestream


Out On The Tiles is the Music Rewind Livestream series where we gather to talk music without any real agenda. Albums, artists, genres, songs, lists, favorites, duds, whatever comes up on any old Friday night.


Original Video Stream: https://youtu.be/4KBnFOUJU_c


Invited Livestream Guests:

Alan Ziegler S1: Paul McCartney-Band on the Run: https://bit.ly/Rewind_BandOnTheRun


Luke Bouris - S1: Radiohead-In Rainbows: https://bit.ly/In_Rainbows S2: The Who-Quadrophenia: https://bit.ly/Quadrophenia_Music_Rewind


Michael Boroski - S1: Pearl Jam-Vs: https://bit.ly/PJ_Vs S2: Led Zeppelin III: https://bit.ly/LedZepp_III


Demetrius Milton S2: Alabama Shakes - Sound & Color: https://bit.ly/Sound_And_Color


Julience S2: Neil Young - Live Rust: https://bit.ly/NeilYoungLiveRust


Keith Higgins S3 Future Guest. Co-Host of the Abandoned Albums Podcast


Stephen Epley S1: Pink Floyd-Animals: https://bit.ly/PinkFloyd_Animals S2: Preservation Hall Jazz Band: https://bit.ly/Preservation_Hall

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Gotham Cigars: Use this link to get up to 40% Cigar Specials at Gotham Cigars. Proud sponsor of Music Rewind.

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Useful Links for Music Rewind

Music Rewind: All Episodes - https://bit.ly/Music_Rewind

Music Rewind Blog - Show Notes and Transcripts: https://bit.ly/MusicRewind_Transcripts

Music Rewind Selects: A playlist of select tracks from albums covered on the show. - https://bit.ly/MusicRewindSelects

Music Rewind Website: Homepage and Info about the show. - www.musicrewind.com

Music Rewind Patreon Early access to future episodes - https://bit.ly/MusicRewindPatreon

Discover our sister podcast, Cinema Decon, deconstructing the movies of the 80’s, 90’s and 2000’s. www.cinemadecon.com

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ZZounds Music. The best place for all your music needs. Guitars, Amps, Keyboards, Mics, Soundboards, everything! Shop here to help the show. https://www.zzounds.com/a--3978729

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Drizly Delivery. Your favorite beverage is delivered right to your doorstep. Use Drizly to get beer, wine or liquor without the hassle of leaving the house. 21 and over only. https://drizly.sjv.io/rewind

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Transcript Below As Follows: Participant #1:

All right.


Participant #1:

Hello. Welcome to Out On The Tiles, A Music Rewind Livestream. As you know, Music Rewind is a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host, Steve Epley, and today we are bringing you a plethora of Music Rewind wine personalities. Here to talk to you about all the things, music or whatever comes up. With us today is a roundtable of previous guests and also future guests for the upcoming season three. Rather than introduce myself, I will let them tell our millions of viewers who they are. Luke, go ahead and start us off there. Hi, I'm Luke. So I always feel like Troy McClure here. Hi, I'm Troy McClure. You may remember me from such episodes as The Who, Quadrophenia and Radiohead and Rainbows. I did a couple of the roundtables was on Roundtable or Two, The Last Livestream, etc. My wife did comment. How many episodes you've been on? It's great. Yes. I'm here for you, like you said, for the millions of yours. Exactly. And Keith, tell us who you are. My name is Keith Higgins. I am a podcaster living in New Haven, Connecticut. I host a podcast called Abandoned Albums. And firsttime visitor, longtime listener, appreciate it and love your show itself. A lot of albums off Abandoned albums that I have. I mean, you talk about these aren't ones that just kind of go off the radar of name bands. These are ones never heard of in my life. Yeah. Really interesting ones. I like it. Yeah, thanks. I hear that a lot. I've never heard of that band. I've never heard of that record. And yeah, that's kind of why they're abandoned, I suppose. One extent it's interesting. I remember when we did our Rock Music Forum, we did a podcast of several different music podcasts. We got together and we chatted for a couple of hours, and one of the questions prior was, what's an Abandoned album for you? And it really kind of threw me because my thought was and I hadn't listened to your show in detail at that time. I have since, but I haven't at the time. Well, it's more of a name named band, but an album that not everybody gets to maybe, like, in through the outdoor or Adam Hart mother from Pink Floyd albums that exist, but they're from a legend label or legend level of band, but yet abandoned from the Fanset. That's what I thought it was. But then I listened to your show completely kind of not completely different, but definitely I was a little off track. But I love your show as it is. Thanks. Yeah. I think the original conceit was to have it be like, these mainstream or larger name bands who had records that have been ignored by the populace, whatever. But as these things do, they sort of morph into what they're supposed to be or going to be. I missed that. What's the podcast again? Abandoned albums. Oh, nice. Thanks. I got some suggestions. I am all ears. Are we allowed to curse? Because I do curse. You can say whatever you want, as long as you don't care what you say. You can say whatever you want as long as you don't worry about repercussing. Well, as Steve said, there are millions of people watching. That's true. I should dumb it down. Okay? We have no sponsors to lose. Actually, yes. I purchased my drink of choice tonight from Drizzley. Nice drink from Drizzley. Whatever that is. Oh, you got it right this time. No, this is a very mainstream drink. No, I meant plugging the sponsor. Oh. Yes. I gave up the ghost there. Normally, I would be out in my garage smoking a nice cigar from Gotham. Cigars. Yes, Gotham. But tonight I am actually in a different place in my house. The new puppy is not too enthused. About the garage recording studio. Are you in Studio B? Studio B? Yes. I found a dog back there. What kind of dog do you get? I've got a shelter and a beagle. Okay, nice. Yeah, wonderful dogs. Good. But they just don't like it when I sit outside for 3 hours till one in the morning and then come inside and wait. And they're puppies. They wake everybody up. So, Steve, I'm going to steal the first question, if you don't mind. I know we were talking about some earlier, but we have a list somewhere. No, we were just shooting ideas back and forth. I have a question as well. Okay. I hope you all do. I mean, let loose. Go for it. Okay, so here's what I'm going to ask of the three of you. So let's assemble the perfect rock band. It can be from any genre, could be from any age. Just who is going to be your lead singer, who's going to be your lead guitarist, who's going to be your rhythm guitarist, who's going to be your basis, who's going to be your drummer? And it doesn't necessarily have to make sense because I am putting you on the spot here because this would take some time. La completely agree. But if you could come up with the perfect band just off the top of your head, who's your favorite singer? Who's your favorite lead guitarist, et cetera. So that's my first question. And that's a question that's going to eat into our brains, because we're going to overthink every single role. Understood. But again, on the spot. So al Gore. Yeah. I'll take the leads up on Rhythm section. I will add Jimi Hendrix on the lead guitar. And if I have a rhythm guitar you said rhythm guitar, too, right? Yeah. You need a lead singer and a rhythm guitarist. Maybe you go with Malcolm Young. I guess. Okay. Because he could be a serious riffmaster if he feels like contributing that way. And vocally, I don't know. Vocally, I'll just say. Paul McCartney. Before he turned 50. All right. Because his voice went to hell after that. I can dig it. Are we going dead or alive here? No, you do you, man. All right, I'm going to go up. Let's hear it, Keith. All right, so lead guitarist would be Eddie Van Halen. Guitarist would be Izzy Straddling, bass player. I mean, Roger Glover I don't think he gets enough of from Rainbow and Deep. Okay. Yeah. All right, let's see. Drummer. Well, we'll keep it in the Van Halen family. Way off with the singer. I'd probably go. Janice joplin. Nice. Oh, yeah, that would be interesting. I'd listen to that band. Yeah. Izzy gets overlooked all the time and it's like every Guns and Roses song. You like?


Participant #1:

Sure. I bought his solo albums after he left Grandma. Sure. Yeah. Juju Hounds is a great record. Yeah. Would you consider I'm sorry? Would I consider the easiest traveling Juju Hounds an abandoned record? Yes, absolutely. In fact, I've been trying to get Jimmy Asherst on the show. I had him on for Broken Homes, and now I'm trying to get him on for Izzy Straddling as well. Nice. I'll never get Izzy. He doesn't do. Never say never. Never say never. That seems unlikely. Get be a great get, but that would be awesome. Is he still putting on albums? He is not alive. He released a single, I think, in 2015 or 16, an itunes single. That was it. What do you think he's doing now? Do you think he plays in local bands or goes out or does anything? I thought about because I talked to Jimmy periodically and I thought about asking him, but I don't want to cry. The last who's? The Gym. You're talking about Jimmy Ashers. He plays bass. He was the bass Juju Hounds and Broken Homes and Got You Bucksharing, several other bands, but I don't know what he does. He issued a Twitter response when the original Cousin Roses got back together. He issued a response over Twitter saying the reason he wasn't joining is because they weren't sharing in the pot. It wasn't going to be an equal slit. So he's like, Fuck it, I'm not doing it. Well, yeah, I can understand that. I don't know what he's doing. I really don't. I guess if you don't have to do nothing, that's a great thing. Yeah. He's an unfortunate position, I suppose. Residuals. Yeah.


Participant #1:

Welcome. I'm going to step in here and throw mine out there. And I'm still debating on the drummer wise, but from a lead singer, I got to go with Freddie Mercury. I know that's cliche, but welcome. Jamal. Yo. What's going on? We are discussing a can I lead singer? Of course. Ultimate band. Put together your ultimate band.


Participant #1:

Thank you. Thanks, Al. That's my change. You can't copy it. I haven't sent my drummer yet. I'm going with Levon for my drummer. I love that. All right, so I got Freddie Mercury as my lead singer, levon Helmet, drummer. I'm going to Future Steel Luke's Flee as a bass player and for league guitar. So I'm going to go with Jim West. You may not recognize, but that is weird. Al Yankovic's league guitars. Nice. That man can play everything you can think of from classic rock to polka to hip hop. The man can play everything. He has several award winning Hawaiian style albums. The man is amazing. So jim west. Well, let's dig into that. Award winning Hawaiian albums. I want to say one of them won a Grammy. Don't quote me on that. But I want to say one of them want a Grammy. But, I mean, that's a very unique style, the ukulele style. Love it or leave it. I was there for three years. I can leave it. Not a big fan myself, but when you listen to him,


Participant #1:

what's that? Is he related to Leslie West? I have no idea. Lead guitar player for Mountain hell, I don't know. I just know that Jim James West, he's one of the guys that answered like, an ad for Weird Out when he was coming up saying, hey, I need a band who wants to play my band? He's had the same band for a decade. And that in itself is phenomenal, let alone the talent of the guys of all the different genres they play. So there's my band that I pay money to see it, especially since Freddie Mercury is Dead, obviously. So is Levon Helm. So that's a weird band in itself. Let's hear Loot Man, and then Jamal can chime in on this, too. Then, see, I don't even know where to start. This is my question. What was the original how did you say it again? Say the original question. Creating a band from dead alive. It could be R amp b. It could be Rob. Right? It could be punk. Absolutely. All right, so I'm going to do the same thing. Rhythm section. I'm going with the who. We got figured that one. Yes. Whistle and moon. Okay. So then that leads me with lead guitar. I'm going to go john Fashanti from the Chili Peppers. Lead singer Shannon Hoon. Blind Melon. What's left? Rhythm guitar. Is that okay? If you want to add one. Pete Townsend. I'm basically taking the who? Get rid of Roger. Taking the who and


Participant #1:

shannon. Poor Roger. Dolstry what happens. Roger's great. Roger's fantastic. Pete Thompson is the greatest rhythm guitarist ever. John Net Whistle is the greatest bass player ever. Keith Moon is the greatest driver ever. My opinion, of course. So that's my band. Fair enough. Good band. Jamal. Cool. What's going on? Good evening. Good evening. I don't know, man. I don't know. I don't know that particular genre, but, you know no, any genre. That's where you throw Jim West in there. He can do any genre. Oh, man, that's tough. I'm going to go with the lead. I'm going to go with my girl, Brittney Howard. I got to go with Britney. I love her voice. Alabama Shakes. Yeah, I love her voice. It's just amazing as far as bass. Boots. Bootsy house. There you go. Man is a legend on the drums. That's a bit tougher, but I'm going to go with I think he's, I don't even know, saturated or whatnot, but he always just found a groove and found a whole second career. And that was Travis Barker.


Participant #1:

Yeah. Blake went to and I'm putting prints on lead on my guitar.


Participant #1:

I could have put prints on any instrument, but Prince is playing the guitar. And then you can back up my girl. Brittany. Yeah. You got to build a band with Prince, Paul McCartney, Dave Groell, all those guys that built an album by themselves. Yes.


Participant #1:

Dave GroEL? No, they'll going with Prince. That's a solid set.


Participant #1:

Am I missing somebody? No, I was picturing it and where the fights would come up. Oh. I can guarantee Prince is going to try to fire everybody. Prince is firing everybody. Control. Yeah. Booty will probably leave. Probably do a line or two. Leave. You'll get kicked out.


Participant #1:

Brittany.


Participant #1:

That's definitely a recipe right there. And the blanket. I just want to get paid. We're still getting paid, right? I know, right? We're still getting paid. So I can continue my career on what you all are doing. I can continue myself. Luke and I had a side chat about Blink with Mike and Danny lately, about just the absurdity of prices and everything these days. So they got a reunion tour. It's like $1500 floor seats for Blink. $1,500? Yes. Absolutely. That is insane for Blink. 22


Participant #1:

albums. I believe they've had many more than that, but yes, two solid albums. This is a ticketmaster thing, though. This is a ticketmaster thing, though, right? I mean, you heard about it. Yeah. So Ticketmasters trying to cut out scalpers, and in the process, they've become scalpers. Exactly. From what I get, that is a valid way to look at it, I think. Do we know how much of that is actually kicked back to the band? It's like, oh, there are all these charges built into it, but nobody really wants to talk about how much of that gets kicked back to the band. Including the band. Blink 182 is fighting it. So they're taking on Pearl Jams. But isn't the contract set up at the beginning? Right. That's my question. Isn't that tour stuff that should have been done?


Participant #1:

Yeah, exactly. At the beginning of the tour, you say, okay, I want 50,000 from the Peoria Civic Center or whatever. And so whatever they can get for tickets, can't they just make up their money that way? But here's the deal is guaranteed an amount. I purchased tickets for Pearl Jam St. Louis in 2019. And then COVID hit. So we sat on the tickets for two years, and they finally rescheduled the tour. So here's the deal. I could either continue to attend that concert in a few months, or I could give it back to Ticketmaster and get my refund. So we paid $100. A little bit over with the charges in there, but we could either give them the tickets back and get that money back, which isn't bad. That was two tickets. Yeah, two tickets for 200 plus. So let's say 110 hundred and 20 a piece anyway. But here's the deal. If I sold them back to Ticketmaster, they would have put them back online for, again, $1,500. So the band is completely out of it at that point because the bands already got their money. I don't know. I don't know enough about it. But I got to believe there's something going back to the artist. I just don't think it's that cut and dry. But you're right. I don't think Ticketmaster is pocketing in your case that you're talking about Luke, I don't think Ticketmaster is going to pocket. Fourteen hundred dollars. Yeah. It's insane, though. It was two years ago, right before Coburn, where I paid 950 for Elton John. And it was worth it. One ticket, 950. That is crazy. But it was worth it. It was great. But to pay 500 for Blink, to me, there's a level of willing to pay for the artist. I have a Legends list. I paid over 900 for Paul McCartney. We're about to see Billy Joel here in November. Those are my Legends list. Blink's not on my Legends list. They're not worth $1,000 ticket. I'm sorry, they're not at that level. Now, if you compress them with that, what is that? Rock Never Stops tour with Fallout Boy and there's like a whole bunch of others, a whole days worth of a festival nostalgia trip. Alright. I could maybe be coerced into that if depending on the set list. Depending on the set list. But you don't get to see that beforehand. You're going in blind? No. Yeah. Hell no, not blind. I got babysitters to pay for. There's additional costs here for sure. That's ridiculous, though. I hope something changes there. That's just absurd, I think. I've never paid more than $100. That's how long it's been John, at Madison Square Garden. And I got swagged for it. And I still don't feel that. I mean, I got my money's worth. It lifetime to see Elton. So it was great, but I never would have fucking paid $900. That's no fucking way. The most I've ever paid was 1500, which was Roger Water's floor seats when he did The Wall. And that was worth it. That was easily the best show I've ever seen in my life. Wow. Okay. I mean, that was phenomenal. And I would do it again tomorrow. Wow. Yeah. That's interesting how we all value money for what right? It's true. I mean, somebody's going to buy radio controlled car and somebody's gonna buy $1500 concert ticket. How do you value your money? Right. Fair enough. My conclusion with this whole ticket fiasco was if people are willing to pay that, then that's the new market standard. That's what tickets are going for. So I think as a consumer, we need to say, hey, I'm not paying that. But they will. So whether the audience is full of smoothie, rich people or it's full of young, hip, 20 somethings that are still in college that are paying $20 to $50 for a ticket, that's a completely different story. But I don't know if the band cares. At the end of the day, if they're just playing, you're going to pay two grand for the next Taylor Swift tour. We'll see. You got to know that's got to be around the corner. I can only imagine what those ticket prices are going to be. Yeah. She just put out a new single or new album or something. She did football. I just came from the party, actually, and two of the girls went, oh, midnight. It was called midnight. It was called Midnight because released. That's right. That's all I know. It was on Thursday Night Football. They did a little thing. Two girls at the party I just came from said that they wanted to come on Music Rewind and do an episode. I did, yes. I left early for this for you guys. I appreciate your priorities. Yeah. That might have been a mistake, but at least you're here. Yeah. But anyway, two the girls said they were going to tag team at Taylor Switz episode and we're going to make it happen. Right, Steve? You usually got a pastor for that kind of action, but yeah, you had me a tag team.


Participant #1:

It's only a matter of time before someone brings Taylor Swift to the table. And that's going to be a sad day for me because I have yet to listen to a full album. It's not my thing. It's not something that I've ever thought. I know she writes her own songs. I know she was in country.


Participant #1:

That's apparently a controversy. She has not written all her own songs. I know that for a fact because I have a guy that I was an intern with who manages a girl who writes who sold four records to tailor's with Michael Jackson is accused of not writing his own songs or he would go to a songwriter by it and be like, that's it, I get the copyright. That's it. Yeah. Does she write her own records? Yeah, she's a songwriter. She's a singer songwriter. Just like Carol King. Oh, you can be a singer songwriter, but she writes all your records. All is a very weird word to use. Yes. And don't quote me on any marketing that she's done. I just know that's kind of one of her things is that she writes her own song. We can maybe tie in my question since we brought up Taylor Swift. It might be in the answer if you guys want to hear it. Well, I figured you would because you are one of the biggest Taylor Switch fans that I know. Yeah, for sure. That information I just relayed about Midnight and being released. You did have the most information about her. Yeah, that's the biggest extent of what I know about her. No, wait, did you do an album called Red or something like that? Look at Allen with the information. I know this stuff, too. So, Al, she recently re recorded Red because the record label was holding captive. Basically wouldn't give her back her masses, right? Yes, exactly.


Participant #1:

That is a baller move, though. Who else has done that? I'm going to re record my entire album TLC, because I want TLC did it. TLC. We recorded all of their music. I think Toto is doing it nice. Yeah, because they pulled all their stuff off. A lot of bands are doing some of that. Yeah. That is the trend these days. Yeah. And some of it's not all good either. No. I don't know how long that waves going to last. Just the idea of selling off. There's a gentleman, Ray Daniels, who's a music exec for Warner Brothers. I believe he's an ANR for Warner Brothers. He had a podcast and he was talking about how a couple of really prominent R amp B singersongwriters, neo, the Dream, a couple of other people sold off their portion of their masters or their publishing. So they're publishing to some of these conglomerates. Nile Bridges, all these other guys. I think The Dream sold 80% of his catalog for 120,000,000 or something like that. Don't quote me on the number, but definitely nine figures. And he said, well, if it's worth 120,000,000, just his portion right now, what do you think Warner Brothers or Sony or one of the Big Three is going to leverage that in five years from now? He's like, but the problem is you do multiples and you figure out all this math on how much it's worth. Now. What are they using that for? Into leveraging the music in the music business moving forward. Which is why Scooter Bronze, obviously one of the guys, bought Taylor Swift's catalog, her back catalog. What is he using for leveraging moving forward? So I don't know if it's a wave because he thinks it's just a trend right now to either garner and hold on to major artists, major and minor artists publishing what's happening. It's a lot of private equity firms that are setting up and buying these catalogs. Private equity is not in it for a long haul. Turn and burn. They'll turn these songs out and burn them out as long as they can somebody else. How do you manage the licensing and the sync rights and things like that? And how do you determine value in that terms? If you're paying 180,000,000 or something from you're getting full rights to everything. So you would have to be paying, I would think you'd get everything. You'd be able to do whatever you want to do with that music. Wasn't Neil Young just squawking about one of his songs that he sold the rights to and was used in a Monday Night Football ad or an ESPN ad? It wasn't a couple of weeks ago he was squawking about that. Did he sell his catalog, too? He sell all of it. He sold some of it, okay. And they used it in an ad, and he's squatting about it. I'm like, well, you can't bitch about it, dude, you sold this. You relinquish the rights to your intellectual property when you sold it. You can cry about it, but shut up. Yeah, I guess you got paid. But the question at the end of the day, these large acts, like, so you say Neil Young, you say Taylor Swift. I know Pink Floyd has recently sold there's, bruce Springsteen recently. Bruce so do these people really need that money? These are the biggest names in hold on. There is an argument there was an article and there was a segment on the Today Show a while ago. There is an argument to be set to be had, and I don't know, it about estate planning and that it has to do with estate planning and setting up future generations from exactly. Grandkids right. I don't know shit about anything about that, but that's what I've heard, is that these acts are selling it because there are tax benefits to setting up their estate so they can set it up for generations. That makes some sense. Are those kids never going to have to work? Not even just kids. Grandkids that's insanity anyway,


Participant #1:

because you had State, Bob Dylan recently, you had Bruce Springsteen recently. You've had a lot of 500 million plus price tags on these catalogs. That's crazy to me to set up your grandchildren to never have to pay a bill. But what they're doing anyway, if they're receiving in perpetuity to what their product is, depends on what the original contract was, probably, right? If it reverts back to them, I don't know what I know. Same contract is five years, ten years, or whatever the statute is, depending on what it is, bill is signed his contract back in the 1800. Who knows what they say, right? Because it's actually 35 years. Record labels don't want you to know that. But there is a lot I just did two episodes about those guys mentioned the same thing. After 35 years, the copyright reverts back to the copyright holder. Labels don't want you to know that. They don't want artists to know that because all you need to do one of the guys I interviewed said it costs, like, $100 to issue. It's a pain in the ass, and it took him three years to get it back from the label, but he eventually did get all the copyright information back from the label to his artist. So after 35 years, that's the benchmark. I forget what it's a federal statute so there is no more of this labels on it in perpetuity or the 75 years it's 75 years for copyrighted information you have the option to get it back or you can just maintain it as it is and labels don't want you sure it's not in their interest but our labels really the future though if they're just holding on to the past there I'm thinking of things like bandcamp so if I wanted to I've got GarageBand on my computer. I could make an album tomorrow if I wanted to. It's not going to be good. Comes out tomorrow 23rd of that music that you make. What I'm saying is if I put it on there it may catch especially the five of us, we all start promoting it to all of our social medias et cetera. It may catch and I may make booka bucks if it gets in the right channel. So our labels even necessary moving forward? I'm not saying that it's the easiest route but I'm of the school of thought that they are necessary. And they're marketing firms these days. They're not labels in the sense that we might remember them where they nurture an artist and help grow an artist. It's like fuck that. No, they're marketing arms now.


Participant #1:

I agree, they are strictly I think they're more marketing firms. I had this conversation, that exact conversation back in 2016 with the former president of Arista Records. I worked at his label, whatever. And I asked them back then because I had clients and they were like some of them were I want to get signed by a major blah blah and others were like this is stupid. Like just do the indie route. But the indie route everything has its pros and cons. But I asked some of that why do I need you if I'm an artist? If I know how to develop my own fan base and keep them fed and I interact with them every day. No one listens to terrestrial radio anymore. I could go on internet radio, I could start an internet radio station and just bring on indie artists and do it that way. And why would I need what do I need from a label other than the marketing? But you're not even putting those dollars in there. You want a ready made artist. Yeah, they like the band, they have marketing in them. Exactly. And so me and him went back and forth for hours over this and I was like that day is dead. It's not the or even early 2000s when LimeWire and all these mixtapes took off and offering exclusivity for any artist and by the time that they got there because his whole beef was that they wanted I can't speak to that genre but a lot of artists and hip hop artists, whatever, they'll have mixed tapes or previous catalogs copyrighted or whatever and a lot of. Labels want that back catalog before they sign them and have access to that. And so I had clients that were like cussing out their managers, whatever, because they're like, I'm not giving you my back catalog for a deal for signing on pennies on the dollar or whatever. Why would I do that if I can, like you said, go to Bandcamp or be on SoundCloud and I can interact with them directly. What are you providing for me other than the access to somebody to become marketing? I'm not sure. Labels I don't think labels are the future in any respect. Like you said, they're not like what they used to be as far as developing talent or doing any of the arts to repertoire


Participant #1:

studio. I don't even need it. Voice coach. Exactly. Or like connecting musicians with the other particular. You don't even need that record company for that anymore. I can mix a whole record over the cloud. I could be with my artist recording in his room while I'm mixing his record before he puts it on. IG they were talking about that on the new Ozzy album that just released. All the different players. They just sent the MP threes and then the musician put their music down. Sent it back and then they weren't even I can't remember which particular song. But Zack Wile was playing guitar and he said the drummer and the bass player weren't even in the same room at the time on one of those songs. I think is what he said. Because I emailed it off and then he did his thing and they emailed it back and then he did his thing. Like that. Yeah. It's amazing. It's a brave new world. However, speaking to energy, though, I would prefer everybody to be in the same place just for cohesiveness. Because as an engineer it makes it for me anyway. Ten times easier if I know I had everybody there than trying to piece it together to make it sound like a cohesive unit. Some of the greatest albums of classic music have been recorded that way. That's nothing new. I mean, you go back to the Beatles, the Eagles, many others, they were all in different rooms, all in the studio, different times, all recording their little bits and pieces. And then there was some engineer magician who is the true guy behind the scenes that put it all together to make something magic. Now, I think the guy who did Ozzy's album, his name is Andrew Watt. Look him up. He has done so many huge acts. He did the last name Eddie Better's solo album. You know, in XM Serious, they do this they call them town hall or meetings or something like that. And then they bring everybody who is in the band or whoever wants to come. It was one of those I was listening to in the car. I caught part of it, sure. So, Jamal, I don't know, you might be able to speak better. This you were talking 90s. Let's talk about 90s rep. So no limit. Is that masterpiece, right? Yes, sir. Okay. He's hiring his family, right? Silk, the Shocker, that kind of stuff. So is that considered a major label, or was he trying to keep the friends and the family? So are they all just like kind of sharing that profit there? No, it was a major label. It was a major independent label with the distribution deal. Understood. Are they keeping the cash flow in the family? So to say, if he's bringing all of his friends and cousins and brothers into the situation, back to our previous conversation where the record label comes in and scoops all up, was able to keep it tight. Yeah, he kept 100% of his masters, but he himself didn't keep his masters. He let every artist on his label keep their masters. There you go. He only took a quarter of the publishing or something like that. Okay. And if they didn't want to stay on the label, then he just let them walk with their masters and their publishing entirely. Snoop went to them too, right? Snoop had said this in a couple of interviews and a paraphrasing, but that was the first time. There's a thing I'm sure somebody might be familiar with this, like override. It was something that I learned when I was talking to hiring. Was that if Luke. You're on my label and you fulfill all your contract. Your contractual obligations. And you want to go to Steve's label. I can still infer like a 10% override or points override on your next album to let you leave some other weird. Weird shit like that happening where you still have to pay. Snoop said that Masterpiece was the first one that let him leave, period. So Snoop's album called Last Meal was literally the last time that anybody took any of his I think was publishing off any of his records. And Masterpiece didn't invoke or didn't push that on him. So he let them keep the masters of publishing and all that so he could eat off of that because he didn't get anything for all the stuff he did at Death Row. So that was one semester p put them on the game and had to do that. Everything after that was up into an including Snoop repurchasing. Death Row was what Masterpiece had taught him, basically. So, yeah, absolutely. Let him keep all of that, and he took his off of the top from Universal, whoever the deal was. So, yeah, absolutely. They got to keep all this. If that's the future of label no, but I mean, for the big ones going forward, they're going to have to offer stuff like that or else they're probably not going to exist. Like we said, they don't really need them. I don't know if labels other genres,


Participant #1:

labels were given the 90s going 2000s, like the cash money 90 or 80 20 deal, the no Limit 80 20 districtly distribution deals, the Rockefeller deal, Rough Riders, all these imprints that weren't a dead jam or whatnot. I mean, they were getting half. They were getting half. And then the labels were eating all the marketing budget off of that and they were just taking 10% or whatever off the top. So. Like. In this genre anyway. Hip hop or whatever. If you look at the Mac Miller. The Whisky. LISAs. The Currencies. Numerous acts that are Chance the Rapper. Some of these guys or whatever in the quote. Unquote. A lot of them. They took that and then they used the perception of indie. But then had a label backing strictly for the distribution fact so they could eat that cost. And all of that came up with the blueprint of what happened in the 90s when hip hop took over and hit the mainstream. You saw the way that these deals broke down and they were like, oh, I can get 80 20, or Cash Limit or Cash Money being a big one, and Cash Money, Juvenile and Hot Boys, Lil Wayne started there. No, that was no limit. All those guys. How many years did no limit last? The original Limit, man, that was like I remember that was like two to thousands. I remember that two to three year flash in the pan. As far as mainstream goes, I'd say like well, no, I'd say mainstream like 94, 95. It's about the early two thousand s and mid 2000s, it was like them versus the Rough Riders. And then Rough Riders kind of took them over as far as marketing, publicity and just overall listener enthusiasm from an outside point of view. But then you also had Puff Daddy on the outside. He was pushed up out, too. I think that's a different error. But it was like the end of the no Limit era or the middle end. Yeah, no one was definitely on the decline. Cash Money was on the rise. And the reason why you know that is because the first Down South artist on a Rough Rider's compilation was Juvenile. And so when Juvenile showed up on the Rough Riders compilation album in the late 90s or whatever, pretty much no Limit have kind of lost that, basically. They weren't the force that they were. So Cash Money kind of took over from that and then basically had a very similar blueprint. And Lil Wayne wasn't even really hot like that. No one knew. Lil Wayne was like 1314 years old. It was juvenile. Was it five or four boys? No, Julie wasn't in five or four oh, yes, Julie was in five or four boys. I thought Lil Wayne was, too. I don't think Lil Wayne was. Don't agree on that, but I'm not sure he wasn't five or four boys. But no limit went that deep. All I really knew was Master P. No, master P. Mystical mia x Silk. The shocker. Cain naval max Silk. The Shocker was his brother, right? Yeah, it's his brother. He's absolutely trash. He's horrible. I heard those days, but I didn't know they were 7th grade for me. Charge it to the game that was on my little walk. Man, oh, man. Charge it to the game I wish my storage hadn't flooded. I have all these albums when I think no Limit, I think those album covers oh, yeah. And it's glittery, iconic. And the spine had the plastic going down the hill because nobody was doing that. Exactly.


Participant #1:

Now who is Three six Mafia on? They were on I don't know what label they were. Well, Hypnotized mine was the name of their label, but I don't know what major they were assigned to. Got you. I was going to say that was another one to throw into the major there, so yeah. I've always been intrigued by how labels operate in the business side of it. Where do you put them in the quality of the times? Who's that no Limit compared to the others? The quality of their music. You talking about music quality? Yeah. Compared to the other hip hop that was in that late 90s. Error. It's a loaded question, because I don't see them that high quality. Steve knows. Twelve year old Luke thought no limit. Yes. Seriously. You had your mainstream rap, you know, Jay Z and Dr. Grace, but twelve year old Luke thought no Limit was the shit. Yeah. Twelve year old Luke waiting for Soap The Shocker to cover the panel. The Shocker was my favorite off that label. Wow. You are the only person on the face of the plan we will ever say that. No charge it to the game amazing. I love that album. Yeah. Some good records on that one, I think. To your point. Steve KLC and beats by the pound. If you look up, look them up. Okay. Right along with Manny fresh. I mean, this goes way deep. Like, my brother is from there. My little brother's from there. So I'm 42. My brother is 39. So when Battle Battle came out, 94, 95. I was 15, he was 13. So when we learned about these guys, for me it was new. But for him, people were experiencing what the New Orleans bounce sound was like. And you've been to New Orleans many times, Steve. So you can hear you listen to jazz. You'll hear and go back and listen to bounce music at that time. You'll hear the influence and everything. What I liked about I've tried I have tried to go backwards. I have, like ludicrous. Yes. How did Ludic come into this conversation? Maybe I don't get the name. Sorry. Juvenile. That's the name. Because he did some stuff with Dirty Dozen brass Band. Phenomenal. He did some stuff with Galactic. Amazing. But going back into the can't connect it, I personally can't. I've tried. And when it goes to the quality of it at the time. My vision of it, my view of it was from the top down, all I saw was what was being played in rural Illinois, radio and or MTV, which was Masterpiece and others. And masterpiece was garbage. I'll say it Masterpiece. He knew he was garbage, though. He was good. So why would I listen to anything else under him? It was the way I approached it. It was like, okay, that's that guy. Fair enough writer's, different story. Granted, I didn't discover till later, but it was still the same general area. No, I thought their music was phenomenal just because it was something that I hadn't heard. I lived in Maryland, live in California, living in Colorado. So those guys never got any play, never got any burn. So when they hit the prime time, they hit the music box or black box, whatever it was. And then Masterpiece Battle Bada got on the radio, it was over with, and then it was out of here. And I was just enamored by what this infused into the culture, because it just wasn't hurt. He started out in California on the indie circuit, so when he blew up like he did, it was crazy. And then on top of that, it was the fact that he brought he introduced so much stuff like the independent movies. Where is he out of Fileman? He's from? They're from New Orleans. Yeah, he's from New Orleans. But he opened up the record shop in California and Northern California and stuff like that. But I know your fascination with Rough Riders is kind of creepy, but


Participant #1:

for me, it was just a different vibe. It was a little different time because that four or five years when they were on the decline and Cash Money was on the incline before Lil Wayne took off, when they were still the hot boys or whatever, was again, something new to defend the creepy. There was only two, from my point of view in Cornfield, Illinois, there was literally Masterpiece and there was BMX and Rough Riders. Pick one. Two more than there was in Utah. That's just two more than there was in Utah, I'll tell you that. We have to import that shit like it was liquor. But no, I mean, I loved it. I loved the quality of music. I did, too. Back to charge you to the game. So Destiny's Child was on that album. Mystical. Young Destiny's Child. Yeah, absolutely. Young Beyonce and LaToya lucky. I don't know. I felt a draw to that, too, because there were a lot of instruments on it, right? The rap music that I like, they play their own instruments. They're bringing that style into it. So you're actually hearing written music. It's not like trap where it's just like a beat in the background, which is fine, but I like when they introduced that guitar and that violin and that kind of stuff in there. So I really dug that kind of rap back then. And no limit brought that. I think that's why I was drawn to it. That's why I was drawn to, like, West Coast hip hop a lot. Because a lot of it was drawn on Old Funk, parliament, Rose Royce, all these samples warned these guys sampled all kinds of other stuff. So I was always in the live instrumentation and how it was sampled. I didn't even know when I listened to The Chronic. I don't even know they had sample problem of punk adelaic until I was yelling at my room and my mom came in and smacked me inside the head because she was like, don't you know this is where they stole her from? And then broke out the album Delic, you know, twelve year old Jamal wasn't that deep into part of it. No, I had no idea who they were then. The song on The Chronic was make my weed the chronic before I get fucked up. And then I was like I was about to listen to that. And then he said, I want the bomb. I want the pea funk. I want to get fucked up to make my funk. That whole thing had no idea what it was. And so it opened up a whole new thing for me. I heard the other day that I hadn't heard in years. And this goes to Allen, and it goes to one of the things we wanted to cover earlier or later on, which was covers, but I heard Black Cow from Billy Dan. And that 100% is in Jamaica. I remember this one, but deja vu from Lord Tariq and Peter Gunns. Oh, yeah. Okay. That is 100% a Steely dance song. Had no idea until right now. I was old. I didn't even know that was a sample until I heard on Deep Tracks that beginning. And I don't have a queued up or anything. I can't play it for you. But that is 100% a Steely Dance song. No idea. I didn't even know. I don't even know why I never put it together. But I didn't know it was a sample from Silly Dan. I sent that to my dad, both of them. He had the kind of reaction of just kind of fuck this amount,


Participant #1:

I guess. I really don't know other genres like rock or whatever. Steely Daniel or Not Steel, but not even a sample, I guess, really, Steely Dan is more rock jazz. That may be the wrong description. It's not something you would ever think to influence 90s hip hop to that extent to where the entire bass line and rhythm line of the entire song I should queue it up to play here. But 100% stealing Band, it just blew my mind. That was one that I had no idea because that was the jam that I rocked out to in the lot. Man, don't laugh at me for that one. No, I mean, sampling is in the hip hop world is paramount to the making of the music. And done correctly, I think, and it depends on what effect you're trying to get to. But, I mean, I can't even remember the name of the jazz artist. But Rizard from Wutang sample this man, like seven times, like the same like the last record on the album, he sells seven different times over seven different records. Very prominent wutang records.


Participant #1:

And you'll never catch it all. You'll never catch it all. As far as even if you look at credit wise, I am not knowledgeable on the Wutang catalog. I want to segue here. Speaking of lost albums, what are we calling? Sorry. So Wutang, they made an entire double album and they made one CD and they sold it for millions. They sold it for the episode guy, right? Yes. You need to do an episode on this. Apparently there's this and it's brilliant from what I've read. So Wutang has this album. No one's ever heard it. The only stipulation was if someone was to hear it, it had to be at a party by the person that owned it. So how amazing is that? So they also put another stipulation on in the year 21 30. It could be released to the public. So everyone that currently knows Wutang is not going to hear it because they'll be long gone. That album could be absolute dog shit. The mythology around it and that is just amazing for decades, from what I've read, it is an amazing album. Apparently they went back to their old style and it sounds absolutely phenomenal. And you know what? Pig flights. Adam, hart mother is phenomenal. It's great. Sure. But no one's going to go listen to it. I have never heard of this album. Adam's heart's mother. Sounds like the name of a good one, though. Pink Floyd. It's Adam Hart mother. It's an unknown Pink Floyd album. It's before metal. It's in there, got a cow on the cover. It's in like, their Tween years. If you could give them in their adult life where, you know, Dark Side, they hit their stride. It's got a great solo or not solo track, but title track, adam harbor. There it is. A cow. That's awesome. There's a lot of experimentation on it. It's not the best. It's not terrible. It's got Alan psychedelic Breakfast, which yes, that's a great one. Al, have you got to be a Pink Floyd fan to really love it? I love it. I'm not going to say that my friends who are Pink Floyd Ill fans will likely fadelled. Son is a phenomenal song if you are a Pink Floyd fan. Fat. Old sun is classic. Is that the controls on there? No. Okay. Can't remember that. No. But the actual title track, adamant Mother, takes up like almost the whole side. So that's a good track. It's another long one. Jam, but that's a sidetrack. But anyway, yeah. Do some research on the Lost Wutang album because it's really lost. It's just not heard and it's just some douchebags they do. The guy got arrested and now the Feds have it. So yes, you're right. That's hilarious. But anyway, it just blows my mind that they went through the whole process of creating this beautiful album and just said, yes, we don't know it's beautiful. It could be shit. Like I said, people that have heard it say that it is amazing. That would be an interesting one. But these are people that are friends of the multimillionaire who's a ticket. You're right. It could be wonderful. Because the rappers, The Wutang, claims that rapped on it had no idea they're actually putting it on that album. Like they thought it was going on an entirely different project. Exactly. Yeah. They had no idea. The decision was this


Participant #1:

was the one kind of put the battery in the back of the guys. But the actual producer, Silver Rings I'm not going to say a lesser producer, I'm not going to say that. But he's a producer for the Wutangling and it was originally his kind of concept, but he knew the guys weren't going to go for it because they're going to make any money off it. So then Rise kind of pitched as an art project and they didn't know that. They thought it was going to come out and it was going to be in the museum or whatever. They didn't know it was going to be on this type of scenario until after it actually happened. So the guys didn't make money off of it? Oh, they got paid upfront. But there's no as far as the auction price or anything off of they're not getting royalties.


Participant #1:

So they were a little pissed. Not a bit of a this is a gigantic lose lose deal for the band. I can't believe that they allowed this again. It's rizzle putting it back. Keith, I think this is your warehouse. I think you need to an episode on this. I think what? I think I need to do an episode on this. This would be a great episode of abandoned albums. Absolutely. I can get them on. I'd love to get an interview with that douchebag. I wouldn't talk about that. I talk about why they jacked people up on the EpiPen price.


Participant #1:

Yeah. That whole thing. Him getting into a beep with Ghost Face Killer, that whole thing. Oh, my gosh. Anyway, I'll put it in the queue. It's an interesting story. Absolutely. I would listen to that in a heartbeat. That's the kind of stuff, like you said, you don't necessarily have to focus on the album itself. Focus on the backstory. Yeah. Yeah.


Participant #1:

He even got a douchey name. Yeah. I just don't miss the EpiPen guy. He bought the EpiPen thing. Somebody else, was it? No, this is his same guy, Jackson. His price went from like ten cents to three hundred dollars for one I don't know. Don't quote me on that, but that was a ridiculous jack out there. But what did he buy before the EpiPen? Wasn't it was Meds right? Before he did the EpiPen. Because I thought the original beef was because he bought the company that had made Meds for I think was HIV meds. And then Jackson, probably the same deal, bought them, and they were cheap, and then he spiked them up, probably the same business model. And then in order to make himself more beloved, he just buys a WuTang album and then keeps it to himself, this guy. I mean, you could be the savior of the people. Just complete beloved if you just release music. But no, it's going to keep it to myself. No, I think it was in the contract. Wutang said, no, you can't release it until 2030. No, they might as well just be in that shit. The space won't be around. Really? I thought that was his decision. No, I think it was literally binding. It was in a contract. That changes things. Yeah, that's why it was a big deal. It's an interesting concept. Like, years ago, I was walking through a gallery in New York City, and there was an artist that I liked, and he had a piece that was rolled up in a cardboard box. You could have it. He would give it to you for free under the pretext that you never take it out of the box. If you take it out of the box, then you have to pay market value for it. Who sets the market value for the product? Who set it for art? Right, exactly. Who set the market value for that Boot Tang album? They said it's worth a million bucks. Right. So who knows? He's a prominent it's art. Is he a prominent artist or was he he's a prominent artist in the art community. I don't think he's not like he's an artist or something like that. He's well known. Sure, but it's an interesting idea. Would I have taken it? Yeah. But I wouldn't have had the strength to not open up to see what's inside, and I wouldn't want to pay 10,000, 20,000, $30,000. I don't have it and I wouldn't have paid it. How would you know if he would have opened it, though, after he took it? Right. What's the word I'm looking for? Well, it could be empty, right? It could be empty. And that's his art. My art, is air. And you have now witnessed it, and that is now $100 million. Thank you. About your conscience, would you have said that you'd open it? Would you say you didn't open it? I mean, that could have been an art project, could have been the theme or whatever. Based on what I've seen, I'm sure there was something in there. I would venture to say there was something in there. Who puts the dollar value on art? Who put the dollar value on the Wutang album, right? They did. It was like a million bucks. Right? It was undisclosed. So it could have been a million for auction. Yeah, it's an investment for the guy that you bought for a million because he'll be able to turn around and sell it for 5 million in five years or whatever. Yeah, I think the Feds did turn around and sell it to pay off his debt. That's crazy. But anyway, just something to think about. I think that would be an awesome episode. If you get enough research in and like you said, get the right people in to interview, that'd be interesting, for sure. Maybe Elon Musk bought it. It could be


Participant #1:

to shift a little bit. We have a category here, your best and Worst Concert Experience. So, Allen, why don't you leave us off there? What was your best and your worst concert? Well, I know the worst one. The worst one? I actually saw fog hat at the Madison theater, which Luke knows about. That I'm sure. Right. But I think the biggest problem with that concert that night was they brought their mid size rock arena equipment, sound equipment, and the Madison only holds like 500 people at the most, maybe. So the bass and the drums, they were just booming off the back of the theater. It was like it sounded so bad. Between the bass and the Jones, it was horrible to listen to you. I won the tickets off the radio station, too, so it's not like I really paid for. I'm like I left. That was the one concert I ever left. The best one, though. Well, it depends on that. So if I could say sound quality actually triumph at the Furious Civic Center in, like, 85. Wow. The sound was superior for whatever reason that night. I mean totally opposite fog. This was like it sounded excellent, but as far as you said favorite. Right. Your question was just best and worst constant.


Participant #1:

I don't know. It's pretty cool. Going to Monsters of Rock in 1000 1989 at the La. Coliseum. Or maybe Guns and Roses. Living Color and the stones at the La. Calcium. Oh, there you go. But it has different levels, right? What do you consider the best? I mean, it was the best because I met this most beautiful looking girl that night. Or it was the best because we all got hammered and everybody had a good time. You know what I mean? It's like best is really subjective, right? Best on October 22, 2022. What does your brain say was your best? I'm going with Triumph. Sound quality. And then, well, gosh, you've seen the picture, right? You've seen the concert stubs. You know what I'm saying? It's hard to choose from. So you've been to a handful. Yeah, I've been to a couple. Those are all state fairs, right? Yeah,


Participant #1:

actually, I could throw it in there. I saw Johnny winners open up. For George throw. Good. Damn. There you go. But what made it fun was, again, I got in for free because, you know, the state cops do the security. And my dad knew a state cop at the time, so I got right up. I mean, I'm like 1015 foot from the band and so that was great. I was 17 years old at the time. The guy, the beer vendor was selling everybody beer. So we were all drinking beer and he was trading money for people who are giving them weed. So we had that going on same time and everybody was having a good time. So I could put that on as one of my best concerts. There you go. Reason they all have their things. Maybe that made them the best. Not all of them. A lot of them did. I know why I threw it at you first. Yeah. Next. What's up? Next? Best concert. Replacements. Nice. Ohio Bogarts. What's the name of the place? They were loud, they were drunk, they were good. They weren't shitty. They're always drunk. And they were fun. They were just funniest out. Worst was probably here in New Haven. Steve Earl was touring. He was redoing Copperhead Road. If you know anything about Steve Earl, he's notoriously sober. Has been for years. God bless being sober that night. If I didn't know any better, I was using again. I stayed for the first four or five songs of Copperhead Road and I'm like, I'm out of here. This is just awful. Really? Wow. It was very disappointing. Everyone has an off night. Maybe it was, but it was just really disappointing because it's my favorite Steve Roll record and I really wanted to go, yeah, same here. I got it on vinyl. I found it not too long ago. That was a great find for me. Yeah, that is a great record. How about you, Jamal? The worst was a Lauren Hill concert. Lauren Hill was by far the worst show I've ever been to. The late ninety S. Yeah. I don't even do concerts like that. I don't do concerts like that. But this is just after she had dropped Mis Education, I guess. She was going through her go through, but her 2 hours late came out, was Whispering Mumbling Records. Whatever the deal was, it was not that wasn't it. It wasn't it. Yes, because I drove from Salt Lake City to Vegas to go see her and it was horrible. But my favorite was the Alcast reunion concert is Centennial Park. That was an amazing show. Every act on there brought their Agame outcast, came out and performed for three and a half hours non stop,


Participant #1:

man. It was amazing. It was the most diverse crowd I've ever seen. And everybody knew all the words. There was no backing vocals. They did all their own vocals and they were just the energy was through the roof. And that was probably my most favorite concert and what year was there a reunion towards? Oh man,


Participant #1:

no like 20 1728 maybe. Yeah. Outcast was a huge part of twelve year old Luke's record collection as well. Yeah, legends, everybody and anybody in the clem. And I was the one for twelve year old Luke. He was an amazing album. Yeah, I agree. That was one of my I think that's when I did Steve's, that was one of my final three. Equipment was right there. Was right there. My brothers both looked that up after your episode. Yeah, they were like me, they thought that The Stagonia was their first one, so I didn't realize there was one for that. Yes. Yes indeed. So yeah, that was probably by far my best concert experience. Like I said, large crowds like that kind of get to me, but that was one that I do it again in a heartbeat. Do it again in a heartbeat.


Participant #1:

Luke, did you hear us? I haven't, I've got cut and dry, both of them. So stone Temple Pilots, 2008 or nine? I can't remember. Worst concert I've ever been to. So, opening band was the local high schools marching band. Where was this? Chicago. It was right on the lake. I can't remember the name of the name. Yeah, I believe it was. Anyway, high school bands, the opening act, they didn't have that on the tickets or the sales sheet. So we came, we listened to a high school band play their stuff and then Scott comes on, lead singer, Scott Weiland, he must have gotten completely plowed beforehand or the night before he couldn't sing, so he got a megaphone and the entire concert he sang through the megaphone. It was absolutely horrible. He didn't have to a couple of songs when I saw him too, and that's why I was asking when it was because I saw him in Bloomington, Illinois. But he did a couple of megaphone songs too. He has some songs where the megaphone would be an assist. He did it with Velvet revolver too. He had a megaphone song concert and he did that too. So he kind of used it as a gimmick to cover up his lacking of skill for the night. Yes, absolutely. Stone Temple Pilots, one of my favorite bands of all time. Core. I could do an episode of music rewind on Core. I could do an episode on Purple, their second album. But yeah, that was just a huge disappointment because I did have such respect for them. The Leo brothers are phenomenal. They get guitar and bass. It left a bad taste in my mouth, but anyway, is what it is. Best concert, so 2006, so I'm sure you guys can guess what it is from Pearl Ranch. Yeah, it was pearl gym. So, two night concert in Chicago. My buddy and I were college kids, only had enough money for the first night, so we went, drove up to Chicago 3 hours, drove back 3 hours, went to class the next day. I'm not going to say which class or which teacher it was, but while I was sitting in class, she said, hey, Luke, you want to go back to Chicago tonight? And I said no. I'm completely drained. And she said, you're a kid. It doesn't matter. You're coming back up. So we went up my future nonetheless. My college professor gave me a ticket, and when we got there, I picked up my buddy Jeremy. We were five or six rows back in the Pearl Jam concert, which, again, those are the big selling ones. Yeah. Best concert I've ever been to, period. We were on Mike and Crete side. It was just mind blowing. It's giving me chills right now, thinking of it. That was the coolest experience I've ever had. And again, from a college professor. So anyone still in college who is talking crap about their teachers, just remember they may hook you up with tickets to your favorite band. Nice


Participant #1:

for me, kind of ties on both sides, whereas the worst concert is easily from an experienced level. Blink 182. I've mentioned several times on various episodes that bands will I was stationed in Hawaii for three years, and bands will come to Hawaii and give a halfass concert, just enough to pay for their vacation, and then they go back to their world tour. It's sad, but it gives the locals and the soldiers a show to see. I saw many bad shows there. Metallica sucked. Tool sucked. Just so many great bands just put on halfassed shows. That's really what they do. But none so much as Blink 182. Man, it was bad.


Participant #1:

Phone. Sorry. I thought your headphones were dying. Steve, you went like this, and I was like, wow. It's like they exceeded our time limit. They're plugged in. My bad. So Blake came out there and they did an all day afternoon ish festival. They had several opening acts, which were local bands. The thing is, though, it was out in the Hawaiian sun all day. There was no shade. Everyone was just getting beat down with the sun. Water was like $5 a bottle. And this would have been in, like, 2000. No one could afford it. We all paid too many for Blink tickets at the time. As we've talked about Leslie, jake came on right before them, and Les and Jake was great. They tried their best, and they put on a great show, Blink. By that point, we had already been there for like, 4 hours, and we were just beat down. Everyone's tired, everyone's exhausted, sweating. No water. Like, screw beer. No one even just cared. People that were drinking beer were already passed out for my heatstroke. And Blake comes out a replacement drummer right off the bat. So Travis wasn't there. And then it was the first concert I've seen that they weren't trying. They were just out there going through the motions and didn't care. And despite the fact that we had stayed there for hours to get to them, we left a quarter of the way through. We're like, fuck this. This is dumb. There is no point for us staying. So that was a very bad concert experience from an artist perspective. I got to throw it out. Kanye Bonneroo, 2008. My brother Tony and I, we were there at so Connie was scheduled to be on the main stage of Bonneroo at, I believe, 1230 or 01:00. A.m. Pearl Jam ran long on the main stage. So Kanye got pushed back a little bit. He was not happy about this. Kanye threw a fit and they said, okay, well, since Pearl Jam is playing for like 4 hours, and they're not like, leaving anytime soon because they're Pearl Jam, would you like to play on the second stage? And he's like, no, Kanye, I don't do that. So okay, well, we'll just have to wait and see when Pearl Jam ends. And then we waited. After Pearl Jam ended, my brother and I crashed for an hour and then went back at two because at 230, he was supposed to start up on the main stage. And this is Kanye's 2008 special Blow in the Dark tour. 03:00 rolls around 334 30 people are pissed off. We're just waiting for Kanye, and people are throwing chem lights at the stage, people getting rowdy. I don't know. Everything was going wrong. Absolutely everything. And he finally came on stage about 445 and just like, blink. Kind of gave a half ass show. Did like four or five of his hits. And within the first four songs for his Glow in the Dark set, the sun was coming up. He waited so long. The damn sun was coming up. It was just an absolute disaster. Everyone was tired. Everyone was exhausted. With Bonneroo, one of the great things is that everybody, they encourage your art across all the walls, everywhere. So you get a lot of spray painted murals, a lot of indie art. The next morning, after crashing for a couple of hours, we're up at like 700 before the next band starts, and all we see is Kanye is a gay fish. Fuck Kanye everywhere, across all the graffiti is everywhere. So it was very funny, and as far as I'm concerned, well deserved because he put on a horrible show. I'm told he did come back several years later to Bonneroo and put on a good show. So credit to him. But that particular night was bad. It was very bad. For best customer experience I'm going to go to as well, one being the previously mentioned Roger Waters. Because, I mean, it was the wall, and it was the wall to Roger Waters vision. He had the money, he had the time, and he had the venue, and damn it, he did it. It was beautiful. Built the entire wall. He had a great band with like GE Smith and other guys playing behind him. Oh, man, it was phenomenal. I spent a ton of money on those tickets because I was also wooing my current wife Michelle, god bless her. I don't know if she was into it, but she went to it. She faked it enough that, hey, this is cool. But I mean, it felt like we could touch the pig. We were floor seats. It was just absolutely amazing. So I don't know if he's ever going to do that show again, but if he does, I recommend going see it. Who did leads? Who attempted the Gilmore guitar tone? Oh, I don't know the names, but there was like three guys. Okay. There was three guys that had Lee guitar. Okay, so GE Smith plus two others. Got you. Yeah. So, I mean, you really can't put one guy understood on David. It took three to replace David, and I'm completely okay with that. But he had a pretty fantastic backup band and then this kind of lowkey one. But Warren, I've seen Warren three times, and I know the lead singers passed away recently, semi recently. But some of the most fun shows I've ever seen have been warrant. So I'm in Hawaii at a place called Gussy Lamores, which is the strip club just off the Honolulu Airport. Just trust me on that. If you're ever in Honolulu, go to Gussies. They have oil wrestling on Wednesday night, so I'm told. And this particular Wednesday night, we were there for the oil wrestling. They wheeled away the pits, and lo and behold, they set up a stage real quick and work comes out and those bastards put on a hell of a show. It was literally a hole in the wall bar. And they played all their hits from the 80s, made some jokes when they had to play Heaven and I saw Red. Like, our record company says we have to say these or sing these songs. So they sing like four lines from each song. They're like, all right, check box. Then they moved on. I was like, credit there. But then as an encore, they covered lit, which was weird, but okay. But then they covered War Pigs, which is one of the best covers of War Pigs I've ever heard, was by Warren. Very interesting. It really was. So is lit, my own worst enemy. Yes, that's what they say. It was an awkward moment. It was a low part. Kind of like, okay, they just put on a great show singing Uncle Tom's Cabin and all kinds of crazy 80s hits. And then my own worst enemy. Alright, sure. But I saw him again about two years later at the Rock Never Stops tour in Ottawa, Illinois. And they were there with White Snake and several others, bad English, some other guys. But they cut to me, stole the show. They just did a great festival set of all their hits, and they rocked. I mean, I got to give credit to warrant. Great show. Can I share with you my warrant story? Absolutely. I lived in Danbury, Connecticut. I worked in a restaurant in Danbury, Connecticut. And I'm in the back, it's between lunch and dinner, and the owner's daughter comes back. She's like, I think the lead singer from Warren is out there. And I'm like, why the fuck would he be in this shitty Italian restaurant in Danbury, Connecticut? And it was right off 84. If you know the East Coast at all, 84 is an artery through anyway, it doesn't matter. What had happened was, I went up there, I'm like, hey, you're the lead singer for More. And he goes, yeah. I'm like, what are you doing here? And he goes, funny story. It was right off the highway, and apparently the tour bus got off to get gas. He got off the tour bus to go to the bathroom. The driver didn't know that he got off the bus, so the driver came back in and took off without him. And he comes out from the restroom, the tour bus is gone, and he had to walk down, you know, like, half a mile. There's holiday ins and shit. So he just got a hotel room. And so he tells that story. I'm like, God, that sucks. And he goes, yeah. He looks at me, he goes, Guess who's out of a job tonight?


Participant #1:

It was very nicely irritated that he was in Danbury getting Italian food. Takeout from it. But he was nice enough. That's like, literally a scene, though, in Almost Famous where they leave the least singer behind. Like, I'm only the lead singer. Exactly.


Participant #1:

That was a shame. I heard when he passed away. Yeah. In that book there's a book with the oral history on the Sunset Strip. They actually to your point, Steve, they do get a lot of respect and a lot of credit in that book for being a really good live band. Do they? Yeah, along with poison. I think we talked about Poison before, but yeah, they get some respect for being a hard working good live band. Who's. A horrible live band. Sorry, I mean, to cut you off. Other than blink. Other than Blink. Who's? Horrible live band. Good studio band. Good studio band. A horrible live band. I don't know this from personal experience, but on one of my coworkers, she went and saw Hollow Notes. I think it was about Don't You Dare ten years ago. And she said it was the worst. I could not sing at all. You're lucky your family, you know that? That is hilarious. On my show, Steve set up in his beer. Steve set up in his chair and said, don't you do it. I watched every episode of Darryl's House, and they're awesome. They are awesome. But for whatever reason, she said it was horrible. Going back to your warrant story, another band that I put in there for me personally is cinderella. Cinderella was one of my favorite all time bands. But one of the reasons is it was and it was December, pure, Illinois. They're playing at this shithole bar across the street from the Pure Civic Center.


Participant #1:

Do you remember Luke or it was right across the street. That's great. But anyway, 1998, December, it had snowed like six or eight inches that day. Nobody was at the show. If there was 40 people there, I might be exaggerating. I sat with a buddy of mine who we braved the snow because they hadn't plowed yet or anything. And I sat probably 10ft from the stage. We sat there drinking in my bar stool. They put on the best show. It was exactly like I had seen him at the Civic Center ten years earlier and they just came out and they killed it. And there's literally 30 people there or whatever. They have my ultimate respect after that.


Participant #1:

Let me sidetrack there. It's kind of a weird thing. As far as Warren Cinderella, that era when I went and saw that Rock Never Stops tour warrant followed La Guns, so we didn't really care about La Guns. They're there, but we knew that Warrant was after them. So we went and got some good positions there, me and my buddy, right until the end of their set. La Gun is finished. Rodies come out and start changing things. The warrant. Backdrop goes up. We got the barbed wire and stuff. Sure. And then this heavy set roady comes out and starts playing guitar and standing for the microphone and just kind of vocalizing and doing some stuff. And then he starts singing. And I'm like, okay. Good on you, Mr. Rhodey. Rock on. No one really knows what's going on. It's Jay Lane. And then he starts singing. She's only 17. And then when he's done, he's like, hey, I'm Kim Winger. And the crowd erupts in laughter. It was the most embarrassing. I was embarrassed for him. I feel bad for the dude. I mean, it was humiliating everyone. I'm not talking like thousands of people, maybe 100, 200 people. Ottawa, Illinois, wasn't like Madison Square Garden. But still, the fact that there was a Warrant backdrop up and it was still in the middle of the instrumental change as far as they're changing out the drum set, they're changing out everything else. And then he didn't look like anything other than a roadie. I mean, everyone thought he was just a roadie. It was so embarrassing. I felt bad for the dude. All you can do is slow platform.


Participant #1:

Can we include aged folks, as in Bob Dylan? My Bob Dylan concert. Bob Dylan is a horrible life. But 40 years ago, maybe not. I mean, you watched The Last Wall, so that's a great couple of songs. That's most of what I know of him live in the olden days. I couldn't tell you another one, but I mean, I did see him live in atlanta, and it was not good. And Paul McCartney loved the Beatles to death. Modern Paul McCartney puts on an amazing show. He's got the energy, yes. But eight year old man voice. He has the voice of yes. That's a warbling thing going on. When you hear him in contract, he relies heavily on his band, and I can't fault them for that. Good backup singers and whatnot, but at least he has the energy to run up and down the stage and sing the crowd favorites. Bob Dylan didn't give a rat's ass. Sure. But still, those are two that come to mind. But I don't know if accounts because they've been around for forever. Yeah, they're like 80. Yep. Yeah. But if you're 80 and you're still playing, the crowds looking to see you, as far as I'm concerned, to me, play what the crowd wants to hear. Sprinkle some new stuff in if you want, but play what the crowd wants to hear. Sure. Because when I saw Bob Dylan, I saw hundreds of people like this. That's all they were doing, checking our portfolios. Whereas Paul McCartney down there at Phillips Arena, whatever it's called now, I can't remember, but downtown Atlanta, everyone was rocking. I saw Garth Brooks at MercedesBenz Stadium a couple of years ago on its first concert ever. A brand new football stadium, downtown Atlanta. Garth Brooks, obviously a legend in itself, but bless him, he put on a bad show. But he didn't put on a bad show. Mercedes Benz put on a bad show. Garth was awesome. They had the roof closed and Garth is loud. They did not know how to properly sound Garth Brooks. It was bad. I mean, every single echo you can imagine, when he says in the Thunder Rolls, you're hearing Thunder Rolls, like eight different times from Ape Dick, different echoes. It was that bad. That's the sound of it. You're absolutely right. It was the very first concert in a brand new stadium, and I'm told that they have worked out sound issues since then. But it's just a shame. And the fact that they had because it's a retractable roof, they had the retractable roof closed, that added a whole other level of echo, and it was just that bad. And it's a shame because we were lower, I'll admit it. We got tickets from a seasoned ticket holder, so we were only like two echoes up rather than eight echoes up. But we still got some of the echo when he was singing. We could see his mouth moving well before the sound hit. But it's just a shame because he's a legendary singer and performer, and it's the only time I've ever seen him. But the venue itself fucked it up. I can tell you my question, since we're talking about touring, if you want to hear that. So basically, my question boils down to who's going to be filling these concert arenas in ten years? And the reason I'm asking is because the Stones are going to finally be off the road. Sure. Yeah, exactly. These guys are going to be off the road. What band is going to be the Nostalgia band or good Enough or big enough to bring people to see them? Pearl Jam comes to mind. Absolutely. Yeah. They're truly peppers. Maybe. Absolutely. They put out two double albums this year in one year. Two double albums. Red hot chili peppers put out two double albums. Yes. In one year? I shouldn't even say one year. Six months. Wow. It's insane. Check those out. Are they any good? They don't I thought the first album was great, so second album just came out last week. I preordered it, and it's still not here, so I haven't really gotten a chance to listen to it all the way through. I've listened to the clips online, but I'm kind of one of those purists. I want to put the record on the yeah, those are two I don't know who's going to sell them. I'm thinking you, too. Does Green Day still perform? Are they together? I believe so, yes. Foo Fighters, for sure. I mean, I know Taylor just died, but I think Dave's got it in his soul he's going to play until he dies, so I think Foo Fighters would be one. Queens of the Stonage are still kicking. Not many people know they've been around since the early ninety s. Yeah, they put all out, so infrequently. Yeah, they've got another one in the cans on their own. Absolutely. Queens and Sony jar, for sure. So what's the criteria to fill these arenas, in your opinion? Is it just catalog frequency, just like, cohesiveness? Well, if you think of no, I'm just wondering in general, like, who's going to carry it forward? Who's big enough to fill mid size to the huge arenas, like the big outdoor stuff? Well, blink one of you, too. You're just talking about tickets for $500. That's that's how stickers are selling. Yeah,


Participant #1:

that's what it will be in ten years. I think what I was looking for, though, is the guys in their 20s that are set to be who could be the next generation, and I don't particularly know that because arena is a key word there. You think arena rock or arena filling? The first thing comes to mind is the levels of Queen or Springsteen or others, guys that filled arenas and changed the game. Van Halen, is there a current eighty s and ninety s who's less than eighty s and ninety s? People who could do that, like Pel Jam. He's dead. Pearl Jam and Foo Fighters are selling not only arenas, but baseball stadiums. And that's not just the seats of the baseball stadium. That's the field. Yeah. Pearl Jam. I can see that Pearl Jam is up there. Pearl Jam has that Grateful Dead style following, and they're going to go on for another ten to 20 years. They're not going to tour approval. I don't know if anyone on this current. I don't think they're going to feel it,


Participant #1:

I really don't. They might break up. They might, but I don't know if anyone on this live stream is capable of speaking of this. Keith, I don't know you well. Jamal, I don't know you well. No, I don't think they'll ever break up. I think Eddie's just sick of it. Yeah, I think they will go the round of side projects and then they'll come back and do some more tours because they're smart enough to do that. They've been around the game long enough to know that it sounds like they've got another album in the can with Andrew Watt also killing it, man. And his albums see, I'm sidetracking here, so I apologize, but Andrew Watt, if you listen to his albums on the high five system, they sound like garbage. He is not a great producer, in my opinion, but he can get people in there and record quick and record radio friendly type songs. And that leads back to you should look up Andrew Watt, see all the huge acts that he's done in the last few years. It's amazing. But anyway, where were you going prior to that, Luke? You don't know who anyone can speak to this on the live stream. Country music. There are a lot of country acts that are filling baseball stadiums as well. Sure, I don't listen to country, it's not my cup of tea, but there are a lot of nostalgia there for sure. And the new acts are actually selling yup Yup Brooks filled Benz. Do you think he'll be kicking in his 80s like Bob Billon and Paul McCartney? I don't think he'll be doing the Paul McCartney style sprinting up and down the stage thing. I think he might be more intimate as far as let me scale it back and give you some acoustic versions without the band of my classic hits sort of thing, which I will still pay money to see because I do enjoy Garth Brooks. But like you said, I don't have the in depth knowledge of a new country to comment on that. I just don't. Neither do I. But I know there are a lot of people selling out huge arenas and ballparks. I will throw out some names, though, namely Kings of Leon and Black Keys. I think they both have the ability to do arena style tours and fill them out. If they have the newer albums to back it up. Kings of Lean, I think, will I think they will try, at least, but I don't think they'll have those long standing decades. Black Keys, I think, will shy away from that because that's not their thing. They prefer the festival circuit or the smaller


Participant #1:

band. That's the thing. That is one of the loudest bands I've ever heard in my life. Just two dudes. It's amazing. It's like the white Stripes. How. Can you get so much? Two people. It's phenomenal. They can do it. It's just whether or not they choose to do it. Simon and Garfunkel sold out arenas. They were the rock man. Their instruments were their vocals. So if you're playing blues music, yes, the Black Keys can fill speakers with raunchy guitar and smashing drums, but I guess you're going with just popularity, then. Your answers. Taylor Swift. We're going back to Tate. Here you go. Yes, that's perfect. Answer the conversation by putting this question up. That is huge. Are there any younger artists that have a desire to build a career, like Pearl Jam did? Or are they just in it to get quick hit, get money and get out? There you go. Good question. One of those North Carolina rock bands got back together. I forget which one it was. Archers of Loaf got back together. We were talking about the other day, a friend of mine were talking. I'm like, well, I guess somebody's got a college tuition bill, dude, it's the only reason they got back together. There you go. Yeah, they had a kid probably around that age. We can make X number of hundreds of $1,000. My larger question is, are there artists that have the desire to build a career? I don't know. I don't either. But I think you're on point there. Yeah, you're hitting on a great point there. Is it about the art and the ability to make that long career and be a legend or just to make the money and get out? That's my logical brain. If I had the talent, I would make one album and sell millions and then say, peace out. I'm going to live in the woods in the cabin. But most people will go out and buy a mansion and spend exuberant amounts of money and they need to continue doing that. Touring, basically do it wrong. That's when they're coming back. The two lives of the one hit wonder. Right, kate, that was an awesome point. You are correct. But I think some people do have the passion. And I think Steve, as you mentioned, Taylor Swift is one of those. I think she's going to keep it going. So, yeah, again, I don't think the five of us are really going to be able to speak to us as well because we probably don't have the knowledge on the country music or the super pops. Speaking of pop, who are the boy bands that are coming out these days? BTS? Yes. I don't know. Do they have the passion? Are they in it for the money? No. After they get done with their military, are they from America or is that the Kpop thing? It's Kpop. So that's the Kpop band that's being conscripted into the military over there, then? I saw that headline. Yeah. So they're breaking up for military service. Damn right. They'll be back. They're going to melt that like Elvis did. Elvis did service. Yeah, Elvis milk it for all it's worth. Speaking of Elvis, in his later career, didn't are you trying to sell the scarf again? No, Danny and Mike jamal hasn't seen or keep the scarf. Daniel might convince me to keep it. Go get the scarf.


Participant #1:

I need to wash my hands. I'm sticky with White Claw. White Claw. Everybody needs to be in on the joke. It doesn't matter what he buys, what he bought from Grizzly. Yes. Drizzley.com people, they said it is their website.


Participant #1:

Elvis scarf. I know. I need to see this. The scarf is sounding iconic right now. Oh, my gosh. So Luke has a scarf which he'll tell the story, but his aunt was at the concert for Elvis in Champagne, Illinois. He threw the scarf and she's got it. And he actually got some of his makeup on it. Wow. Now I got to see it. Julian is joining us, too. There it is. Signed. I forgot that it was signed. That's right. I told the story for you, Luke, so you don't have to tell it again. Thank you. I feel like I shouldn't get this out. Show us the makeup. So, Julian, if you would like an Elvis scarf signed by the King himself, luke has that available. Come again? Sorry.


Participant #1:

That's awesome.


Participant #1:

It's. What? 04:00 A.m over there. Yes. Good morning.


Participant #1:

Thanks for showing up, man. And you guys will know Julian's from his Neil Young Live Rest episode, like our number two episode sorry, Luke. It's beating out Kadoskinia


Participant #1:

and also his amazing singles that are out right now. You got alcohol and cold eyes yellow eyes Sorry. Late for us, too.


Participant #1:

So what were we talking about here, gents lost track selling out arenas. Coming up, who's the next up and coming act to start selling out arenas worldwide?


Participant #1:

We've given a couple of thoughts there. Yeah, we're thinking later on in life, too, like 20 years from now, who that is currently topping the charts is going to stick around for that length of time. You've got your Foo Fighters, you've got your Taylor Swift, but who else do you have?


Participant #1:

Adele maybe doing quite well. That's valid. Yeah, those are two good ones, for sure. Yeah. I forgot about Adele. She's got two albums, right? No, she's got three or four now.


Participant #1:

Is she British? Yes, she is British. Okay. Wasn't sure. It's Jared. I could see that, too. Yes, definitely. Before you joined too, we were talking about who has the passion to do it. There are a lot of current artists that could potentially do it, but who do you think has the fire in their belly to continue out? Like the Paul McCartneys and the Bob Dylan's? Definitely. I share it. Definitely. Alright, I could see that as well. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I've seen him because I work at a football stadium there and he's played a couple of times over the years. And the passionate guy has to play his life is unbelievable. He's on stage on his own, basically, most of the night, and it's just awesome. He's got the arts guitar and this loop machine that he's got and he's whacking away at it and go on for 2 hours straight. And yeah, it's unrivaled, I think, at the moment. Does he play that? He's got, like, a mini Martin, doesn't he? A Martin guitar? From what I've read. He's just got a miniature version that he sets up there in place, too, which is fantastic. All right, I get to see Ed Sheeran as well. All I know of Ed Sheeran is the movie yesterday, the Beales movie. Okay. Which personally, I enjoyed. I thought he did a fine job. Yeah, it was fine. But he's not in the US style rock arenas atmosphere, I'd say. I know. He's huge in England. Yeah. 80,000 people, 5 miles in a row here at Wembley, easily, really. Yeah. But you said the last one was a big European stadium tour. And I think he had four nights at Wembley, which holds about 90,000 people. And he has to add another night, maybe another two nights, because we sold out. That quick. Wow. That's amazing. Yeah. That sharing is definitely diversified as sound since he first came out. If anything would help him in that arena is the fact that he has a lot of he's got a lot of music with, like, some Afro artists, some R Amp B artists and things of that nature, like collaborator products or products, projects in that arena as well. It's in line between the new product and projects. True.


Participant #1:

Indeed. Here's another scenario. So let's say Liam and Noel,


Participant #1:

I think we might see peace between Israel and Palestine before that tour would sell. Absolutely. Just imagine the ticket sales from that side. Maybe that's what their whole plan was. Maybe they're still getting together every Sunday for Roast. They've thought this out. They're like, all right, let's give it 1015 years and then we'll do a reunion. We get Julian's open for him. There you go. I wouldn't say no to that. No. I pay for it to do it anyway. There you go. So, Julian, I don't know if you pay attention to your views on your website, but within the last couple of weeks, I've been checking out your stuff and I must say that I dig your style. Thank you very much. Yes. You're doing some good work, so keep it up. Thank you very much. Yes, I'm working on a New Signal is coming out pretty soon, which is actually cover of a Rory Gallagher song. Hopefully that should be coming out in a few weeks. I've got loads of material I'm working on at the moment, so it's definitely coming again. And I just found within the last day or two that you're on bandcamp, so I'll definitely okay, good. Yes. Thank you very much. That goes into a category that we kind of had on the side here as far as possible topics for tonight, which is great covers. What are some of the great covers that you guys have enjoyed throughout the years? Timeline doesn't matter, but just songs that you know are covers that you enjoy. Jamal, do you got anything that comes to mind? Yeah, Michael Jackson cover of Come Together. The Beatles. Yeah, he doesn't cover that. Yeah. I have not heard that. Yeah. To me, that shit is phenomenal. I am writing that shit down. And then there's another one that Luther Vandross did. I was actually looking it up when you called on me, and I had found out on here, If Only For One Night, which was covered. I'm sorry, no. If the world were mine, which was Marvin Gay and Tammy Terrell? And Luther Vangero did a hell of a cover on that record right there. And those just a couple at the top of my head. So when I heard the original, I was like, Damn, they took that from Luther? And my mom was like, no, no, no,


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the original. So, yeah, those are two of them to come on top of my head. I'll throw these two out there. I'll probably get shit for this one. But Whisky in a jar by Metallica, I think. Is that's wonderful? It's a great cover. I mean, I love the Thin Lizzy tune, but they just nail it. And I think Garage, Inc, that was an excellent album altogether. Mostly covered. Garage Inc. Has died dying, my darling, which is in Stone Cold crazy, which are both great covers. And then you really got me Van Halen. Yes. When I heard the Kings version, I was like, who the fuck is this? Why are they ripping off Van Halen?


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But I thought, that just killed it. Yeah, those are two. Nice.


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Luke, what do you got? I'm trying to think of some off the top of my head so Hard to Handle. Black Crows. I believe that was out of shredding. I think you stole Els. Did I? Was that you out? No, I'm still trying to think. Ask anyone off the street who things are hard to handle it's Black Crows for sure. Otis Redding was the originator. But, yeah, they covered it so well that most people probably don't know the original. There's so many, though. I probably had a little too many of these white cloths from Drizzly.com. You like the white clothes?


Participant #1:

Drizzly.com? Do it. Get it in. Yeah. What about The Staples Singers version of the weight? Is that a cover? Because the band sings with them? Yes. Is it on the left walls? Yes, it is. Yeah. That's a collaboration. That's more of a collaboration. Well, I think I saw this happen. It was kind of blurry that night, but I saw the Screaming Cheetah Wheelies at this tiny little outdoor venue in Chilkata, Illinois, and they came out their very first song. They did. How many more times is that one song and they nailed it. It was great. I never found it on MP3 or we recorded or anywhere, but it was really cool. The first song, they were an opening band. It was like a three band concert for a radio station's birthday party type thing. And they came out and did how many more times. I was like, that is awesome. Pretty ballsy to cover that. Very first song of the night. Very first song in your set. So they impressed me. And speaking of Led Zeppelin, pretty much all of their songs were fantastic covers, right?


Participant #1:

Took a second for that one to land. Thank you. I'll be here all night. Tip your waitress. White claws. Replace Les Zeppelin with Vanilla Ice. You have the same joke. There you go. So I absolutely love a smooth. Criminal by Alien and Farm. That was beautiful. Excellent.


Participant #1:

I'm going to go with The Man Who Sold the World is always a great tune. But also, if you look up anything by The Main Squeeze, they're great funk jam band and they do some great covers of Heavy Cigar, man in the Mirror, Papa Was a Rolling Stone. They turned those classic songs into ten minute jam sessions and they're phenomenal. So I highly recommend listening to those. They are in my playlist daily. The Main Squeeze, please, everybody check them out. Semisonics version of Smooth Criminal. They do a version of Smooth Criminal. Semi has alien Antarctic. Dude. The closing time, people. Smooth is that Semisonic? Good way to refer to them. The closing time people. That's all I know them as is. The closing time people. Yeah. Rick Bistro had a video about the 20 greatest wonders of the Closing Time was one of them. They had another song called Secret Smile. That was another one of their hits off of that album, which is a great song, too. I had their album, but it was relatively forgetful. It was ninety s. Yeah, I bought it because of closing time and that was it. That was the only song I could talk to you about. So, you know, they play closing Time at the end of Georgia State football games and we play it at my job, too, to get the hell out. There you go. We need to reshink on our sitcom ideas. We really do. Yes. Have you guys ever heard the George Michael cover of Seals Killer? Going into Papa was a rolling stone? No, it killed that's another one, too, right now. Michael didn't cover. Speaking of George Michael, how about Lind Biscuit? Faith? Anyone? I am going to say Luke and Mike after you on that one. Wow. You guys know Faith, right? Yeah, we know it. All right. Yeah, it was huge. It was huge. Come on, Luke. I will give you this. It was a song.


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No more white claws, Luke. You don't have to light them. Speaking of whiteclaws, you can get them@drizzley.com.


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Like I said, though, there are so many and my mind is just drawn a blank currently. And I know the rest of you are, too, but wow, that even booted off Alan. He's like, I'm done. I will reiterate, though, to the George Michael thing. I love the verse of Don't Let the Sun Come Down on Me from George Michael and Elton John together. Fantastic. Would you like me to ruin that song for you? Maybe every time you hear it. Don't let the sun go down on me substitute the line. Don't let your son go down on me. Why are you doing Never never would have. I don't think Gary Topping didn't have that in mind. I don't think he did, no. But that is a great question.


Participant #1:

George Michael, I don't think it's enough credit for his voice. And if you remember back to the Freddie Mercury tribute concert, that was a great concert and I had it on VHS. You had George Michael singing 39, which was really good. From Nythe opera. You had Robert Plant singing Crazy Little Thing Called Love, james Hatfield singing Stone Called Crazy. A whole plethora of artists singing Queen tunes. And it was really, really good. Extreme did a medley of several different songs rather than just one. And they did really good that showed Gary Sharon's vocals. And you can't remember the guy's name right now because it's almost midnight and I can't think of his name but his guitar.


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If you ever get a chance to watch the Freddie Mercury tribute concert, that is well, time spent. Really good concert. I love the face of knocking on Evans door in there as well by Kunda Roses. Yeah, absolutely. That's huge. See, those are the ones that are missing right now. I don't think there are a lot of those. I remember when I watched that in the barracks with my buddy Clint at the time the joke was made that this was probably the last time that Metallica and Guns and Roses played in the daylight ever. There you go. How about Johnny Cash hurt? Yeah. There you go. That's a good one. Absolutely. That's a great one. And that's one that Trenton Reserves got on record saying that's his song now. Exactly. What about Whitney's? I'll always love you. Yeah. Dolly Parton. No one really took to that version. No one really liked it.


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Say it again, Steve. I had it as part of my intro for the 90s roundtable. It was there. I gave it credit. That was beautiful. That I didn't know was a cover. That was another one that I didn't know was a cover. Bodyguard contract is top ten selling albums of all time, right? Oh, yeah, the bodyguard. That was the album it was off of. But I believe that's one of the top ten selling albums of all time. The Bodyguard album.


Participant #1:

Yeah. The Bodyguard Sound of Music and The Greatest Showman are, like, the top three. And then, like, number four is O'Brother, where art Thou. Wow. Yeah. Dolly built the holes. Antitanic, right? My heart will go on Celine. No. Nobody bought Titanic. I think it's okay, man. No, I'm kind of ignoring that one because I forgot to mention it. October Fest is great. It's great beer. Where did you get that? October. Steve Kroger.


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You're right.


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No.


Participant #1:

Damn. I can't edit this scanner. No, not this long. That's alright. That's alright. Alright, so let's see. Next topic. Where are we at here? Overrated bands.


Participant #1:

I disagree with that statement wholeheartedly. So their first four, five albums, they're phenomenal. So good. But tranquility based. Hotel and Casino. Well, I shouldn't say they're most recent then. They just released one last week. Yeah, both of those albums are an absolute bore. I can't do it. So yes, I will agree with that. But whatever people say, that's what I'm not their first album. I'm going to say top ten for me. Wow, really? Yeah. If you guys don't know it, I don't know it. I just don't agree.


Participant #1:

Get it? This album is phenomenal. Seriously. This is Arctic Monkeys. Arctic Monkeys. Whatever people say I am, that's what I'm not. It will rock. Knock your socks off. My opinion, Julia, I will admit I have not given them full attention. It's more been in passing. And my first thought was, that's boring. Okay, so maybe I need to give them full attention. This one is anything but boring. This one is. What album is that? Their first album. Whatever people say Am, that's what I'm not now, their breakthrough was Am. I shouldn't say their breakthrough, this album really put them on the charts. But Am was their mainstream kind of introduction to the public as a whole. And then after that they said, okay, let's completely switch this up and let's do Jazzy bar room in the 40s, smoking our cigarettes, sipping our martinis type music. Maybe I didn't give him a second shot because that's right at my alley. Well, that you might like. They're too much albums. Yeah, maybe I will. My overrated band is you too and always will be. Okay, I'm throwing Wilco in. I don't get Wilco. I don't get it. And you don't have Danny and Mike here to defend. To defend Wilco. Somebody blows smoke up my ass about Yankee Foxtrot Hotel one more time, I'm gonna fucking watch. Shit album. I should have Brian on here from his episode. He's a big fan of that album. Brian from the soundtrack. Your cast life. And it's a good album. It's not my favorite. I actually prefer songs from their previous album over that one. But it was a good album. As I listened to it repeatedly, I gained an appreciation for it. I don't want to have to listen to something two dozen times to appreciate it. If you can't get me after three or four times, fuck off. I don't have time for you. That's respectable. Everyone's got their taste, but I can't argue that at all, for some reason. Yankee Hotel fox trot. If you put on your headphones, there's so much going on. If you just kind of just lay back in the dark, sit in a dark living room, just put your headphones on orally, it is amazing. It's a trip. See, I'm a lyric guy, and his lyrics just don't make sense to me. Sure, I'm both. I previously would have said Radiohead. I would have. But this particular show has changed my mind on that. Particularly luke in Rainbows. And I have revisited okay, computer. I have listened to Kid A. I appreciate those albums much better now than I did ten years ago, 25 years ago, and I would have said overrated. But I do have a better appreciate for Radio head today. So I am still staking my claim on YouTube as overrated as fuck, and I have no desire to listen to them. I'm sorry. Michelle, my wife, if you're listening, she loves you, too. But I don't know. Pretentious. The songs are average. I'm sorry. I just can't do it. And let's keep in mind, this is personal opinion. Yes. We're not trying to offend anybody. I put a damn song on my iPhone that I didn't even want. No. I put a whole album on it. Yes, they did. They're shoving that down your throat to get off of either. I don't know. I like you, too, a lot. They made some missteps. They've got a pretty good career. I don't know. I think they're thinking about you, too. Half of Octoon Baby I can handle, but then after that, it's just garbage. What was that piece of shit they released after that dance Interior, or whatever the fuck that was? Just yeah Lemonade, or whatever the fuck that was. Yeah, that was a weird one. Although it doesn't stay on that, which is a great song. Okay. But I think what makes things like they went from the Joshua Tree to Octung Baby, right? That Breaking Point was such a radical departure because he couldn't sing that way anymore. That was a 33, 34 year old guy. He can't sing the way he was when he was 26, 27. And that artistic departure, I think, is so noteworthy. And then they took it a little too far, and then they came back. They came back to it all. He came back to us in the late 90s, early aughts with the rock and roll. But I see where you're coming from. I really like the was it Rattling Home, that documentary. They're like playing in a subway, and it's just them as a band jamming. That's awesome. That was really good. But when you get their pretentious shit, I don't know. I don't know. It turns me off. And it doesn't sound good. It doesn't sound as good as those early albums did. But I think they have a good sense of who they are and a good sense of self, at least it might get loud. Can we talk about that? It might get loud. With Jimmy Page, Jack White and the Edge. I've seen scenes it's a great scene. I've seen scenes with Jimmy Page starting to shred and Jack White staring at him in awe. Just what's happening right in front of him. It's pretty cool. But he's pretty self aware of who he is as a guitar player. Absolutely. And in the movie, he's completely upfront about it. I play chords through all these distorting echoes onto it. Now, it sounds great, much respect for at least knowing who they are, but they have a sound, and that's why he earned a spot in that movie with two other greats. So I got respect for them, for sure. But are they one of my go to? No. Absolutely. Has anyone here seen Sing Two? No? All right. There was a Thing One, it's an animated movie with cartoon characters. It's a jukebox movie where they take modern music and the characters sing it. But in Thing Two, there's this mythical character off in the wild that they can't get to who wrote a bunch of great songs that changed the world. And I'm sure you can guess who this character was voiced by by now and stuck in Bono. Right. That's where I'm going with this. But throughout the whole movie, we can't get him. We can't get him. And then you'll have other characters start to play chords of YouTube songs. And when I'm in the theater with my kids, and my kids are loving it because it's a cartoon, but as soon as they play, like, three chords, my wife looks at me, she's like


Participant #1:

it's. She loves them. So I just put my head down like, I know this is going no, it's going like the finale of the whole movie is


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song. I haven't found what I'm looking for. And it's like the beginning chords of that are never ending until Bono comes out on stage and the crowd goes wild. Yay. Anyway, I hit you, too. Let's move on


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over.


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I'm going to say Jim, but I'm going to piss some people off if I say what I'm thinking. By all means, no. Al, you're up if you say Pearl Jim, let's hear why. Yeah.


Participant #1:

Like, after Vitality, it was just the same old over and over again with maybe one or maybe one, maybe two good songs on one album. And that was it. They lost me after Vitality,


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I think that they've I'm not trying to defend them or go against them. It's just I think they've evolved in their career to be literally the newer Grateful Dead. And that's just and that's newer knowledge to me based on what I've learned of this through this podcast. And also just in my personal listening to more since Mike browski's episode last season, season one, where I didn't realize they were still freaking touring and that you had people that were going to 30 shows, 40 shows. You had so many people going to these shows over 30 years. That's amazing. They are literally the new Grateful Dead. I mean, they've kind of reinvented themselves in that way. Yes, they have a following. And there are some people that are going to every single show on the tour. They're taking months off of work to follow them. So when you've got diehards like, that Deadheads, basically. It's insane how many people would do that. And there are the people that will pay the $15. Like at the beginning of the podcast, we were talking about ticket prices. There are people who will pay that every single time. And they are again, setting the new standard for ticket prices. Those are the people that are setting that standard. I will defend probably until the end. Even though they're the ones that actually had a lawsuit against some games. Exactly. Yes. It is Catch 22 for sure. To be honest, they did play like three and a half hour shows. If you look at set lists, they're always a different set list, always plays 50 songs in a night. It's ridiculous. Exactly. Yup. Every night is a different show. And you have that many albums and you have that deep of a catalogue to go into rock On Cubans as well, because they're going to do a Barbara Reilly. But who is one of them. Exactly. And your buddy Neil Young. They do rocking in the free world. Yeah, every night. I'm, Pearl Jam, Diehard, I will all of them until the end. And I will say that their last two albums, in my personal opinion, they shut the bed. And when I say last two albums, I mean last three albums. I will say there's a great two hour not two hour, a great 20 minutes version of Down By The River program. And Neil Young on YouTube, they recorded with Neil Young Mirrorball, if you guys aren't familiar with it. Pearl Jam. Sans Eddie better recorded an album with Neil Young. Neil Young was the Eddie Better of that album. And then final yes, if you still have it, that's a pretty good I know, I don't. I wish I still did, but no. So Eddie was being stalked by a fan at the time, so he wasn't able to make it to the recording. So anyway, he made it later on and here's what happened. Pearl Jam left and Eddie Better came in. So Eddie recorded two songs with Neil Young and who was ever available. So their producer, Brenda Brian, played bass and Jack Irons from Reddit Chili Peppers was the drummer and he actually drummed on Yield and no Code, which are both pro Jam albums. So anyway, they recorded two songs and they wouldn't allow them to put it on Mirrorball. So they made an EP that was a companion piece to Mirrorball called Merkin Ball


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Long Roads, one of the songs, and I got ID, which is like. Ego and ID. So check it out. Those two songs feature Eddie Veter with again. The band had already left because they had already recorded their part. So Eddie came in and sang with Neil. And they're both beautiful songs. I Got ID or I Got shit is what most people call it. That's one of their greatest. Pearl Jam's greatest songs. Put it on your list, Steve. I know I send you a lot of recommendations. We've got a guest here, chicago mike. Mike there's some shit talking about the Pearl Jam. So I had to get in. I got a text. So I was like, oh, shit. I got to come in now. I'm all jazzed up for it.


Participant #1:

Guys. Unfortunately, the guy you want to go at is he's falling off where'd I go? But speak your mind. Pearl Jam has been labeled as overrated. What is your retort? Mike well, here's the thing. Like, I guess if you don't, like, have not been with them for years, I don't know. I mean, they're not I believe he said they dropped off quality after vitality. And that's fine. I mean, I get it. Like, I know a lot of my friends and stuff that I used to go to shows with were like, after that, it was that it was vitality. They don't make the hits anymore. But I don't know. I mean, honestly, once you see them live, like, it honestly doesn't matter. I will say this. And has somebody seen them as much as I've seen them? Do I need to hear even flow or like alive or Jeremy or any of that shit. But to see him live, it's like I'm sounding like a deadhead. But I'm fine with it. I'm fine with seeing a deadhead about this once you see them. And I know Luke feels the same way because Luke was like, I don't like this new record. And then I was like, dude, you got to see the songs live. And then in St. Louis, he was like, yeah, you're right. The live, it's so different. And I sound like a weird hippie that's been smoked out of his board for 25 years just listening to the same shit that happened up in Vermont for back in 72. Like, who the fuck cares? But


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it's tough. But I gotten to a point in my life where I don't have to defend them anymore. It's like, well, I mean, shit, they sell out every place they go to, every concert they've ever sold out in the last, like 20 years. And then if they're albums suck, who cares? They're going to play like, a lot of the stuff you want to hear anyways. But anyways, pearl Jam. Woo. Sports. I am a broadcasting live from wonderful Spring Valley, Illinois. Is that Natalia Flag? Yeah, this is


Participant #1:

Spring Valley, Illinois. It's my dad's 69th birthday party and came out to defend Pearl Jam and apparently some witches. I don't know. I don't know. What the I hope it's going well. I told Steve I was just going to pop in all pissed up. It'll be great. But here's the great part. You're drinking a beer? Julius just woke up. It's 04:00 a.m. In. God bless him. Yup. He said he's having his coffee or tea. What are you drinking, julius. I see. Red bull. Gross.


Participant #1:

Nice.


Participant #1:

Michael, quick question for you, though. Who is your most overrated band? Oh, man, there's like seven, I think. But I know we just talked about it earlier this week. Steve, I will say van Halen is fucking overrated. I'm sorry. Where's he at? Oh, he's not here. She dropped off. No, ellen dropped off. I was like, Ellen, big fan hailing guy. I'm not a huge fan hailing person. I'm not a huge stones person. But then who the fuck am I like? I like the Decemberists or one of my favorite bands. Music is subjective. But I will say you're wrong if you think like Fuel or like puddle of Mud is a good band. That's when you're wrong. Even if you're in that band, you should be like, I was embarrassed that I played that guitar on that band.


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How are you doing to your sisters? This is my wife. Hey, how's it going?


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Marissa. Ask her about Creed. So exciting. I'm so honored to be here. Oh, my God. Michael says you're a big Fred DERs fan. Oh, my God. She really likes Creed. Hot dog flavored water. Yes.


Participant #1:

See you later, Mike. I own chocolate starfish and hotdog flavored water. I will say that I do own that album. Did you purchase it? I did, yeah. I have it via Kazaa back in the day, but there wasn't much else to download at the time. I've got $3, billy all significant other and Chocolate starfish. You got vinyl? No, not vinyl, no. I bet the album cover of a poppy flavor wall with a gray in that size. I want to hear jamal, what's your overrated band? I don't know if I have it in this particular one, band or artist triple quest is overrated. Yeah, I said it. And I will beef with anybody. I'll take the smoke with anybody on it. We've got a try called quest album coming up this season. I know you do. And I want you to want me to hear this. So yeah, I think they're completely over to be a great intro to the discussion. Yeah. Use me. Well, here's the thing. I have not listened to Midnight Marauders yet. My friend Dom, who's going to be on tonight but couldn't make it, he did the DMX episode. He wants to come over. He's my neighbor. He wants to be here when I listen to it for the first time. Midnight Marauders is an amazing album. Other than that, I don't even understand. I don't even understand. I'm in the culture and I really don't understand what their impact is. I've listened to these guys for over 20 years. And outside of Midnight Marauders, I'm like a Five Dog was rest in Peace was an amazing artist. But I think the scenario is not on Midnight, right? No, that's the only song I know. No. Midnight. Marauders. It's a classic. It's a project. There's no stand out record. It's just you don't press pause. You can just play it all the way through, but everything else, they've done. I don't understand Q Tips appeal. I fall asleep when I hear him rap, and I'm like, this dude. There's nothing abstract or genius about his bars. Fair enough. They upset me because what is that? Luke? This is Chocolate starfish. Oh, Jesus. Did you get that from Drinkly? I did, yes. Wrinkly. Hey, look at this. Parental advisory. Is this why, though?


Participant #1:

Wait, look. We have a custom album. I haven't opened this forever. There are two CDs in oh, goody. DVD full of extras. Two of shit is still shit. You have twice the amount of shit. Doesn't include bootstock. 99 yes. Are there any hits on it? Okay, wait, you mentioned Faith earlier. I mean, that was not on that album. This is the second disc featuring RunDMC OOH. It's like that. Y'all got right vehicles on that. So they sampled Run DMC, kept their tracks, and just said Featuring. There you go. I'm sure they had to pay for that. Not the nose. I'm not sure if they made any money off that. No. So, Steve, let me clarify, though. QTIP, the producer, amazing. Probably east coast. Dr, dre. Q Tip the rapper trash Five Dog amazing. Completely overshadowed by Q Tip. And I can't remember the third guy's name off the top of my head, is Buster Rhymes. In no time or not. No. They were all a part of a big collective, leaders of the New School. And that was like Buster Rhymes was part of a different crew. That was a different rap crew. Buster Rhymes is on papaddy. He was on victory. Yes. He was on victory. Correct. He was on victory. So, yeah, that was West Coast, right? No, that was on Puffy's. No way out. That was right after Biggie passed away. Back to leaders of a new school. Leaders of a New School was an official collective. Not just random leaders. No, leaders was a different crew, I think, man, and I want to say native tongue, but that's not right. So leaders of the new schools buster Rhymes, Charlie Brown. And I forgot the other two brothers names. And then Tribecault Quest was Q Tip Five dog, and I forgot the other gentleman's name. Together, they were like they were collective. They've been known each other for years and years and years. And then they did records that here we go scenario. Like, there's a collaborative record, which I think is on Loudest of the New Schools album, but don't quote me on that. So they were collective, but Tribe had always been their own thing. They all just came up at the same time. Where are they? Out of New York. Yeah. So was Buster rhymes east coast. Oh, yeah. Brooklyn. Brooklyn and Puff Daddy. And they brought them onto the no Way Out album. Yeah. But by that time, Buster had went solo. Okay, got you. I was going to say I didn't know if they would mix the two, but that makes sense. If you went solo, that would make sense. Yeah. They had broken up I mean, by that time, by the time Busted did Victory, I think he was like three or four albums into a solo. He might have been two or three albums into a solo career. Got you for sure by the time you did that. Yes. That's my overrated crew. Julius, do you got an Overrated album or band? He's an Arctic Monkeys, but oh, yeah, right. You let us off with Arctic arctic Monkeys. Let's hear some more.


Participant #1:

Let's go back to our kidney. Blur. Blur. I think the race is just about enough. I don't really know many Blur fans today. Enough, really. From what I've heard, Blur versus Oasis is a big thing in netflix tells me that in the 90s it was, but now people have come to the senses of Oasis. It's just a million times better than the blue. But Netflix says. Come on. Yes. Netflix is always right. I even think the gorillas are better than Blue. Even though it's the same guy. Yeah, I love the gorillas. That's what Damon Alban is. It the gorillas.


Participant #1:

Yes. I love their stuff. That's very I can't think of the word for it, but just imaginative, really creative, how we put that together. Yeah. That's one person, isn't it? As girls, as a group? Or is it just one person? I think it's two of them. I know. It's David Alban from Blur. I'm not sure the one is it's evolved and the band animated is four members, but I don't know if all four of them translate to actual human. Yeah, the band itself is mainly the one guy, but then he has some guest vocalists now and then. Right. Delos soul and others. Yeah, he's got Dale in there. He's at school, boy. He's got a few other people on there. But I was curious because I knew the production. I know it wasn't four people, but I didn't know if the production was one person or two. I always thought it was two people.


Participant #1:

The best personal thing we've got on here as far as list of things is if you had to have a personal sports entry song, wrestling, baseball, walking up to the plate. Soccer. Football for you, Juliet. Sorry.


Participant #1:

Weirdos. Across the pond. You know how it goes. If you had a personal sports entry song, what would it be? What's the sport? Doesn't matter. Dives, wrestling, baseball, something solo to you. Like you're walking up to the plate, you're entering the ring. You're going out to be the solo kicker for your elfootball sort of solo kick. I don't know. I don't know soccer at all. Sorry. How about just walking down the sidewalk? What's your badass on walking down the street? What do you want to hear? Saturday night live? Strut. Yeah.


Participant #1:

Sounds a lot more lame when I say it that way. Sounds a lot better when I'm thinking, like walking up to the plate.


Participant #1:

What you got, Steve? I put a lot of thought in it today and I'm going to go with right now from Van Halen. The piano at the beginning and then there's the bass kicks in. I love that tune and I think that's a great intro song. Regardless of the sport, it's a good intro song. That's mine. I'm going to go porch by Pearl jam. Nice. There you go. That is an excellent choice. Porch is a song that many people seek out on their live set list. So I'm digging it.


Participant #1:

Jamal. Oh, man. I literally have a whole workout playlist dedicated to this. But I'm going to go with mystical. Speaking of no limit, I'm going with mystical. Here we go. Probably the coldest bass line in a rap record and you got to hear them when the baseline kicks in and you already know who it is and you know what it's about and so, yeah. Here I go. Here. I go by Mythical. Yeah. I'm coming out the tunnel. Yeah, I'm playing. I apologize for dogging no limit earlier. Then I will never let you forget it. There you go. We will have our go around when I introduce the MCs versus rappers special episode. Yeah. Well, we'll go to town on that one. Yeah. Juliet, what you got? So this is the scene. It's the Alexander Palace in London. Wilt darts championship. Final sabotage with a bassy voice. The beginning of that song. Yes. Any sport that would work. Very nice. Perfect. Is that played a lot over there in the soccer games? No. How about arctic monkeys? Do they do maybe a Sheffield Wednesday or united because that's where they're from. But not in Manchester. Nice. I'll say we play waiters when the NFL visits. That's when you get the BC boys down south London. Luke, what about you? I thought about this long and hard as well. So queens of the stone age. Josh Homie's guitar tone is just dirt and I tried to narrow it down. So give the meal. What he wants is a good one. I'm designer from era vulgaris or I sat by the ocean. All of them have that dirty, nasty guitar coming. That's what I'd like to think that I am. I'm 130 pound white dude, so I probably don't have that badass of an entrance, but that's what I'd like to think that I've got. So if I'm coming to bat, I'm bringing that guitar tone with me. Excellent. Excellent. I am going to wrap it up here for the night though.


Participant #1:

Let's see. Thank everybody for listening. This is only our second last year, so I'm really bad at this live. So I want everyone to please check out Keith's podcast, abandoned Albums. Great show. A lot of episodes out there. Please give a listen. Check out Julian's and his full set of singles and albums out there on Spotify and all the streamers. Excellent music. Please give him a listen. Band Camp. Throw him some money. Throw him some money on Band camp. Absolutely. Jabal millenn, check him out on DCB Audio 360 on Instagram for all your audio engineer needs. I'm not on social media. Luke is invisible.


Participant #1:

Luke is invisible other than his alcoholic purchases known to the interwebs. Oh, man. Please help support the show by joining our patreon if you wish. We have several levels there depending on what you want to do, but up to you, by all means. I don't really care. Go for it. Special thanks to Bryce Evans, who gave us our new intro music since the Good Man Brother. Sounds great. Hold up, hold up, hold up, hold up. What's up? Uhoh, he's cutting off my outro here. You never know what Luke is going to come back with. It could be an Elvis scarf. Buy my scarf. What is that? This is what we were talking about on Our Last Livestream. Oh, he's got the Grindstone mug. Yes. Nice. Help him out. That is the album artwork from Grindstone, brian 7th most recent single and an excellent tune. And he talked about it at length with how that artwork came to be in Our Last Livestream. That's pretty cool. Yes. If you join his mailing list, he will send you a few songs right off the bat. So I figured since he's sending me some free songs, I might as well throw him a few bucks for the songs. Bought the mug. Got a nice patch with it as well. So join his mailing list. Very cool. Let's see. Just visit all the links in our show notes, music rewind, Podcast.com. Please like share and subscribe. If you ever want to take more of the show or be a part of our conversation, we'd love to have you. I'd like to thank everyone. Luke Keith, Julian, Jamal, alan earlier, mike Briefly. Thank you guys. Thanks Steve. Alright now, good meeting y'all. You too. Have a good one. Have a good weekend, guys. Okay guys.


Participant #1:

My dog is a hater.










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