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The Who: Quadrophenia with guest Luke Bouris - Show Notes and Transcript

Updated: Feb 6

Music Rewind welcomes returning guest Luke Bouris to discuss the classic album Quadrophenia by The Who.


Album: Quadrophenia

Artist: The Who

Year: 1973


Transcript as follows:

Participant #1:

Hello and welcome to season two of Music Rewind, a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host, Steve Epley, and in each episode, I will invite a guest on them to tell us about their favorite music album, how they discovered it and what makes it special to them. So I wanted to take a moment and thank you all for listening and supporting the show. With the limited operation we've got here, it's all thanks to you that we were able to keep growing with more amazing guests and bonus episodes. I will ask you, though, if you are enjoying Music Rewind, please check out the links in our show notes. They will take you to either our patreon, where you can donate to support the show and get special content on the side, or to our amazing sponsors, zounds for all your audio production needs and also Drizzly, which will deliver your favorite beer, wine or spirit straight to your door. This all helps us keep the show going. Thanks again. And now on with the show. Joining me today is our first returning guest on Music Rewind, Luke Boris. You will remember Luke from our episode Talking RadioHeads in Rainbows and also our two part classic rock roundtable. Luke is a lifelong music nerd and also moonlights as a guitar player himself. Welcome back, Luke, and thank you for being on the show. Hey, thanks for having me back. By popular demand, everyone's been requesting me. I know this. Absolutely. You're one of our most requested people. Everybody's tied at zero, though. You're one of the most. There you go. Well, man, let's jump right into this. This is a big one. What album would you like to bring to the table and why is it special to you? Well, if you listen to the roundtable that we did, I think you're going to have a good guess about what we're doing tonight. It's Quadrophenia by The Who


Participant #1:

and it's their 6th studio album and their third rock opera. I'm going to count a Quick One as their first, kind of like Rush 2012. The whole album wasn't a concept album. It was just that song. But the same with Quick One, which is a fantastic song if you haven't heard it live, they do an awesome job. And then, obviously, we got Tommy as well. So Quadrophenia is their third concept rock opera. Yes. Tommy, I was well versed. It I could recite to you, Tommy, word for word. That was kind of like a part of my childhood and beyond and the movie and the album. And I'd always heard of Quadrophenia, like, oh, you got to listen to it. You got to listen to it. I knew a couple of tracks, obviously, the Real Me and Love Rain Over Me, but I had never listened to it all the way through until this. And thank you for bringing this to the table. This album was just magic. I agree. It was wonderful. I'm going to have a hard time keeping this short. I think we're going to be up all night here. We have no limits on time. It's perfectly fine. We'll get into anything you want to talk about because this may end up being just a geek out session about a fantastic album for sure. And it's not just one artist either. All of them bring the top of their game on this, for sure. Yeah. So how did you discover it? I actually got into Quadrophenia later on in life. My dad had the greatest and bouncy, so I grew up listening to that. And he also had who's next? Which I could easily do an episode on who's Next as well. Anyway, Quadrophenia, I would say freshman year, sophomore year at college is when I kind of got into it. Okay. And what really blew it up, too, was my love for Pearl Jam. 2007. I believe so, yeah. That would have been sophomore year of college. Eddie Better and Pearl Jam did a cover of Love Right Over Me for the Sailor movie. I got to see that at Bonnaro. That was one of their encore numbers. Nice. And that blew my mind. He nailed it, for sure. I can't speak enough about his vocals on that, no offense at all. But as he aged, as he is aging, I should say his voice is kind of declining. My opinion. He's come up with this new style which works for what he's trying to do. But in that song in particular, I think that might be pinnacle any better. Especially the studio recording. He just gives it us all. Yeah. I've always known it's just a really good song. I did not know it in the context of the story. And we'll get into the story, I'm sure, but it adds so much, and especially when you get to the Visa version and Roger Daltrey's vocals on that particular track, it's just so much. There passion, desperation. There are so many words you could use to describe it. But yes, Roger at his peak as well there. So for Eddie to be able to recreate that, it was something special. And I did get to see it in concert as well, too. Pearl Jam, obviously, I have not seen The Who, but so anyway, yeah, the album kind of touches on youth alienation countercultures. Now, were you familiar with the Mods? Not before Quadrophenia, no. Me neither. I guess I was familiar with rockers just from seeing it in America. But I think Mods was definitely English. It definitely wasn't I didn't know it was such a specific thing. I thought that was just I don't know, the style, the way they dressed and riding around on the scooters. I thought that was just kind of something that that age group did. I didn't realize there was such a dedicated subculture to this. Dedication is an understatement, for sure. If you watch the movie, which I know we talked about. I did, yeah. It was lifestyle, for sure. Anyone who's listening right now in HBO, Max Quadrophenia, the movies on there. And it definitely adds another level to this album as far as how they put it on screen. Yes. And I actually watched a documentary on Quadrophenia recently. I believe it was called can you see the real me? It was a BBC special. There you go. It was, like, in seven parts on YouTube. I don't know why they broke it up, because it wasn't that long. But yeah. Pete described the album as human frailty and abandonment set to the tune of a barreling freight train. Which is probably a perfect description. And it's fascinating to me that the mods, just to describe a group of youth, most likely early 20s. They wore very smart suits, they had very trimmed haircuts. They were very dedicated to their appearance. They wore, like, Air Force jackets from the military and they rode around on scooters. They were very dedicated to a very specific type of music. They did not like the Rmbb that the rockers went towards. They were more towards the early Hoo styles. And the Kinks the Kings were another big one in there. It's just very interesting. That subset was the base for the who's early years. And then he writes this rock opera. It doesn't paint them in a great light as a whole? No, not at all. We'll find that out. Yeah. It's not that he was dogging his fans. It's just really telling a story. And then you get I don't know how to put this in the words. I was talking to them because he was technically one of them. They cut their hair the same. Yeah. It was definitely their lifestyle as well. So you're correct in saying the most mod of them all, they said, yeah, for sure. You've seen how he dresses on stage. He's all about his presentation. So do you want to talk the story, the music, the arrangement? There's, like, so much to talk about. What do you want to talk about on this? I think we can do song by song like we did last time, and we can do all three. We can cover what's going through jimmy is our protagonist. We can talk about what's going through his mind at the time. We can talk about the amazing base presentation that John and Russell has delivered. We can talk about Keith Moon's insanity on the drones, et cetera, et cetera. I want to mention that in the probably 100 times I've listed this album since I go through the season here, as I'm about to do an episode, I kind of dive into an album and I'll list it over and over again. But with this one, I actually found online an 85 page thesis paper dedicated to the mental illness described in the album. There you go. It was like a doctorate type of paper, someone's going for their doctorate. And, man, that was detailed. I didn't get through it. I probably got about a quarter of the way through it. If you wanted a bridged version, Pete actually wrote I've got the vinyl record here. For those of you not being able to see, he actually wrote yes. This is perfect. It really is. It describes the album in a condensed form. I shouldn't say condensed. It's pretty wordy, but yeah. Did he do that for Tommy? I don't know if he did or not. I actually have Tommy sitting right here as well. I don't believe he did. Pink Floyd didn't. For The Wall, by the way, if you see back there, I got Tommy up on Tom. You go, beautiful. And I'm holding it. And I see animals underneath, too, which you obviously chose for your animals is always prone. The Wall, an essay of that nature would have been very helpful to help understand the story of The Wall. The craziness that's going through Roger Waters is mine, for sure. Yeah. Tommy does not with Tommy. I saw the movie first, so I knew the story okay. And that helped me enjoy the album. I haven't listened to Tommy and Nature. I need to put this one on. But something else to note. So you can see on the Tommy cover, all of their faces are in here. What I thought was neat about Quadrophenia cover. Yeah. We'll dive right into there. So there are four quadraphic cover for those. Listing has a Mod sitting on a scooter. And he's got his Air Force jacket there with The Who on the back of the jacket, the logo. But the scooter has multiple rear view mirrors and each mirror is an actual picture of each member of the hoop. Here's the fun fact about Jimmy. So, Jimmy does have Quadrophenia, which is what we're talking about. Quad being for personalities. And each of the personalities pertains to one of the members of the band. So we got Pete, we got John, we got Keith, we got Roger. So each of the band members also have a dedicated song on the album. So helpless dancer is Roger Daltrey's song. And the description is Tough Guy but a helpless dancer. So apparently Roger Daltrey, in my opinion, all the live stuff I've seen all of the interviews, he seems like a gentle giant, but apparently he was a fighter. He did not mess with Roger. So, yeah, basically, Tough Guy, but helpless answer. And then Dr. Jimmy, John and whistle. That's his song. Because there's a break a few times in the song, actually. It's called? Is it me? And he's considered the romantic bellboy is Keith Moon, which is described as a bloody lunatic, but I'll even carry your bags, so devil may care attitude, that kind of thing. And then obviously, Pete's love rain over me. So its description is a beggar, a hypocrite. Love rain over me. And each of those has its own motif that reoccurs throughout the album. It will cut into the songs, which, by the way, I think that's what makes this the perfect concept album for me. Anyway, like you said, each of those motifs is throughout the entire thing. So it's just as a whole, it's just beautifully done. It works well when you appreciate it. Like, we are approaching it as a concept album. But if you were to jump over from track to track, just Random Man, this would make no sense. Sure. This is tailored to front to back. You kind of have to normally I would ask the guest, how do you listen to the album? But there's really only one answer on this one. Sure, I agree. But we haven't even gotten the song one yet. I'm going to do another sidebar here. So we were speaking about Who's Next earlier. So Who's Next was supposed to be another rock opera. So it was called lifehouse. Basically a bridged version is. So we had Tommy. We have Jimmy for Quadrophenia. Bobby was the main character for Lifehouse. And basically life has become hazardous. The world has been polluted so terribly that everyone has to live in these suits. They're called life suits. Basically, they're living life through virtual reality, which we're not too far off from that we don't prophetic there. Yeah, absolutely. But Pete's ideas were so grandiose and over the top for this one. No one really understood what he was trying to do. So they kind of took the songs from Lifehouse and turned them into Who's Next? So they rearranged them. So basically, you got a concept album, but it's been chopped and rearranged for radio. So they do stand alone to some extent. I don't want to say all the sounds in Quadrophenia do, but you got the real Me 515 can, even though it's got some of the motifs in there. And then love brain over me. Those are kind of the three. I believe they released those three as singles. Yes, those are the three, for sure. But anyway, another side note. So 2021 was 50 year anniversary for Who's Next? And I just found this out today, actually. Pete Townsend is going to release lifehouse. He is going to really give us that concept album. Yes. Since it's the 50th anniversary of Who's Next, he's actually going to put it in the correct order. He's going to add the songs that were cut. I don't know if he's rerecorded them, but if he hasn't been, I'm sure he's got his demo still that he can kind of soup up and make it a concept. So we're getting another who concept album in 2022, which is amazing. We'll have to do a bonus episode and just dissect that when it comes out. Get first impressions. That'd be fun. Absolutely. All right, well, let's dive into this. I've been just babbling here. Go for it. Take us to the track one. Track one is I in the CBPA, walked around making field recordings. So it starts off with the ocean noises, the rain, television, train whistles, parades, whatever he was encountering, he recorded. And this song kind of just sets the tone for the album, in my opinion. You do get some Roger vocals in there as far as the four motifs correct some of the recurring ones. And then you'll hear your bell boy, you hear just little bits of it. Yes. And Pete actually whispers in the background. Oh, does he really? Yes. You catch that, but, yeah, like you said, helpless dancer. You got the horns. Is it me? Bell boy. Love ran over me. You get a tease for all of them and they all represent the voices going on in Jimmy's head at any given time. And then the song kind of just fades out and what you get is Roger here screaming, can you see the real me? So that kicks us right into the real me.


Participant #1:

John Entwistle's tone on his base is just so phenomenal. I wonder how long we get before you start talking about it. It really does. I guess it's tone. Again, I'm not a musician, so I said that in the last three podcasts, I believe, so. I don't know how to describe this stuff, but tone, there's just something in his bass guitar that not many people can even touch. I don't know if I've heard another bass player like John and Whistle. What always fascinates me is the skill needed to keep rhythm and time with Keith Moon. That is a level of bass playing that is impossible. How the hell does he do it? Because Keith Moon, especially when you watch the videos of some of these songs, live with Keith playing, I mean, it's like the dude got eight hands. It is. How the hell does he hit all of these drums in the right moments to keep a rhythm and still add in those jazzy things on the side? It's nuts. Yes, I agree 100%. And then at some point throughout this album in particular, I don't even know if he's keeping rhythm, he is going so quickly. Obviously there's a rhythm of some sort in there, but he is just wailing on those. I wonder if it's just what if? Would Keith have been as good as he was without John and Whistle to keep that rhythm steady? I don't think so. I think that's a good point. I think he needed someone like that to maintain. And you could argue that Entwistle is their lead guitarist because Pete has always been known as the rhythm. He's the king of rhythm. I'm going to go ahead and say, I think Pete Townsend is the best rhythm guitarist ever, period. Again, opinion giant Whistle is making up for that. And I shouldn't say lack of lead guitar, because Pete does come in a few times in this album and has some stellar leads, but john Net whistled. I think he could be considered their lead guitars. The real me. Just classic who. To me, that's just everything hitting on all cylinders and that's just everybody's just on point for a good rock and tune. Story wise, it's Jimmy going to a doctor, a preacher and others trying to figure out what is his deal, what's his issues without getting any solution. Yes. No one understands what's going on in his head and his personalities are coming to the forefront. So YouTube john at Whistle isolated base. I think I sent this to you and Al deep POW. So anyway, I'll stop babbling. But I also touched on this in the roundtable. We got our first Keith Scream in this song. So I don't know if you noticed these, but throughout the whole album he is hitting so hard that he's just yelling at the top of his lungs. And it's so loud that his drum microphones are picking it up. That's awesome. I think it's at the 56 second mark. So if anyone listening is counting scream number one is 56 seconds into The Real Me. Then that leads into which is pretty much the overture. Quadrophenia the track.


Participant #1:

I have that note as well. I would compare this to overture off of Tommy. Yeah, Tommy has overture and then underture which are two of my favorite tracks off that entire album. And then here you have something similar and we'll talk later on. But Quadrophenia pretty much serves as the overture. You got a little bit of everything in one amazing instrumental arrangement and starts off with Bell Boy. And then this is back to what I previously said. Pete actually shows his lead guitar chops. Fantastic. So heavy synthesizers as well. So what Pete did was he played the organ and filtered it through a synthesizer, which was a fairly new technology. And as far as I know, I don't know if anyone was utilizing the synthesizer as Pete was at this time. I don't know if I'm necessarily the best person to be talking about this album. I was not born at that time, but I don't know, I think it was pretty unique for The Time isn't Me melody is then played on guitar. That's obviously from Dr. Jimmy, like we said earlier. Then Helpless Dancer, the horns come in and followed by the melody played on the violin. But then Love Rain Over Me, the piano kicks in, ends with more ocean waves. You got your motor scooter coming in, all of those field recordings. So Quadrophenia then drifts into track four, which is cut My hair. And this is kind of where the story really begins.


Participant #1:

Yes, it's the first proper track you have The Real Me, but this is exactly where it begins for sure. And then we do get another Keith Scream right off the bat. Really? They noticed this one? Yes, 41 seconds in. I noted all of them and it looks like there's one, two three more in the song. You'll have to send me that and I'll put it in the show notes because I want to listen to it again. I want to listen for the ones that I missed. Yes. He's just an animal. Absolutely. He actually destroyed multiple drum kits recording this in the studio. Oh, really? Now, I knew he did that live, but I didn't know he was doing it. No, just in the actual recording, there's like little damage. Little damage. And then apparently, when they did Love Reno for me, he destroyed his kid in the studio. Just not like theatrics just plain sure. Holy cow, that's crazy. Keith alive. I'm sure you've seen clips, but he duct tapes his headphones to his head. He's just a crazy man. So I believe that for sure. Yeah. But before an episode goes live on Friday or Saturday, I'll post a homework assignment for anyone that's paying attention to my Twitter account and I'll say, here's your homework for the weekend. But I am 100% going to post the YouTube video of Bellboy with him singing the vocals. It's great. It is just absolutely great. We'll get the Bell boy, though, but yeah, distorted guitar part in this. I don't know if he was putting that through the synthesizer as well, but sometimes it sounds like his guitar is overly produced somehow, so I don't know if he's using a bow. I know John Paul Jones used to do that with Zeppelin, so maybe Pete picked that up as well. But anyway, it's beautiful. It's just another layer added on. You've got your standard piano, you got your synthesizer, piano, organ, and then you've got these guitar effects that just add ambiance to the whole thing and then they use different vocals. You got Pete Townsend and Roger Daltrey singing as far as to kind of it sets that atmosphere of the different voices in his head. Yeah. So why should I care? And then just different vocalists. And this happens on multiple tracks. They have beautiful harmonizing on this one and Pete did take the lead for most of it, too. There are some songs on here where The Who becomes a trio because Rogers nonexistent at all. And I think those are probably the ones that Pete felt most passionate about, that he was the only singer. And you'll notice, too, on some of those, keith is actually just keeping a beat. He's more subdued. Whistle isn't all he can be restrained when he needs to be. Yes. So we'll get to those two later. Jumping ahead. So Cut My Hair is going to say where the story starts and it's Jimmy trying to he's describing how he's fitting in with the mods. Correct. How he's got to keep up with the fashion, he's got to get his suit to be specific dimensions and look a certain way. He doesn't want to have the kids at school look down on them because he's not up on the fashion. Fashion was really an important part of this whole subculture. It was. I'm going to go back to something you said earlier. You mentioned that The Who actually started as a mod band. Well, their very first single, before they were even The Who. I made a note, here what the band was called at the time, the High Numbers. So the high numbers. Their first single was Zoot Suit and I'm the Face. And you actually get to hear the refrain from Zoot Suit in this song. They lifted the lyrics from their very first single. And on that note, just terminology. The Face, that's what The Moth kind of called themselves within the group. Like, let's say you were out there with The Faces, which there was groups called The Faces and such. When Keith Moon died, the person who replaced him was Kenny Jones and he was the drummer for The Faces. Nice. And Rod Stewart was obviously the lead singer. Yeah, Kenny Jones was the drummer for quite a while after Keith passed. Yeah, I did not know, let's say the terminology of The Face, I'll be the best face out there, sort of thing. Yeah, because I didn't know that I had to read up on the mods and I would never have known that you could say, this album was written for those people that had grown out of that subculture. We appreciate it now, having no connection to that group, but still, it was definitely written for them. Yes, it was, for sure. And after this one comes with Punk and The Godfather, which I claimed as my favorite jam, I believe, on the round trip, I think you did this song. It does it for me. You said the real me was who. Their finest song is just perfect. Who


Participant #1:

says, if I meet someone that doesn't know The Who, I would direct them to the song. You're going to get a flavor of every one of their talents and it's just a rocker through and through. That's a good question. Someone who's never heard of The Who, where would you direct them at? Yes. What song would you give them? I would probably say 515. Yeah, 515 would be a good one. This one is good, too. Bob O'Reilly won't get fooled again I'm sure they've all heard that. But anyway but, yeah, this one just kind of just smacks you in the face, just bursts in with authority. And I mentioned this to previously, pete and John's guitars almost sound like they're having a battle, kind of like the voices in Jimmy's head. I don't know if that's intentional as well, but that didn't


Participant #1:

anyway, I just thought that was neat. If it was intentional, that's genius. Again, my note here is classic who music. This is what you expect from the rock legends on all levels. Fitness song. Yes. That's a great note, for sure. And, yeah, John at his finest too. The tone again, it's just perfect. Roger actually harmonizes with himself. And this pete doesn't come in for the harmonies, he gets to do both parts there. And from a story perspective, this is Jimmy going to see a mod group. And in my takeaway, I guess he's disappointed. Yes, because they're supposed to hit this high level of faces and it's all show, it's all theatrics it's all phony, none of it's real. I had phony listed as my description for the band on my notes as well, so you're spot on. And the band itself, the Godfather portion, is like, tough shit. Thanks for your money. There you go. Another note that I made here, which is a popular saying, never meet your idols because you'll only be let down. And then that's true. The tone you get with this, too. But, yeah, just Keith screams a couple of times in this one as well, so I'll get this to you after the show. Every time I noted a Keith scream, I'm sure I missed them too. But, yeah, Pete's part in the song, he's got kind of an echoing effect and he's kind of harmonizing with himself on that part as well. And again, I don't know if he's using a Sly guitar or a violin bow, but there's just a lot of cool effects kind of just echoing throughout the whole thing. So it's a great song. I love the reference to my generation as well. Yes, I've got to know about that. So not only are they referencing the four themes throughout, they're also referencing their older stuff. So, like, Zoot Suit, their first single from the previous song, and now they're going to their first album. There's a bit of a meta level to it. Yeah. And he does that through a talk box, which, I don't know how popular that was at the time.


Participant #1:

I know Stevie Wonder did it in concert quite a bit. Peter Frampton, years later, obviously did it to death. And this would have been quite a few years before Animals with their talk boxes


Participant #1:

until I'm really into this. I'm just feeling it. Sorry. I already took animals. Anyway inside one, if you're a vinyl fan, and I think that's just the perfect song to end side on. Yeah, side note, during all this, as I was telling you, I did buy the vinyl, got it for like $25, used on Amazon. Nice. And I appreciate the order and the set list as far as what ends and what starts a disk, they did that very well, for sure. And even on the CD, it's a two disk. They ended at site two and site four, obviously, so it ends perfectly for those as well. So, yes, I agree, that'd be difficult because that was the only medium back in the day, but it would be difficult to choose the order and especially for story like this, that needs to be told in a specific order. Kind of like, say, like the wall ends. They have part one and part two. And that break is done. Well, hey, you starting part two and stuff, so it's in that same vein. Agreed. Then we go into track six, which is the one. And this is Pete on lead vocals again. Yes. And this is who is the trio. I'm going to do another side note here. In 2008, I went to see Eddie Vedder solo. He was touring into the Wild, the soundtrack that he did. Okay. And he actually performed the song and just reinforced my love for this album, for sure. But, yeah, that was the last concert I went to with my dad, actually. And fun fact, he and my uncle came with my buddy and I and they thought we were going to a Pearl Gym concert. And when it was Eddie sitting on a stool with an acoustic guitar, they were so disappointed. Really? I think they left about halfway through. Really? Yes. They bought these amazing Eddie Veterans tickets and left my buddy and I there so that we could go out drinking. Went to the Cubs game the next day, which was great. But, yeah, it was something. They were so disappointed they left, but I was certainly not. And I'm One by Eddie Vedder is something you guys should look up. Yeah, let's see if there's a YouTube on that one. Yes. Auditorium Theater, 2008. Check it out. He did an amazing job. Anyway, I did see somewhere that I'm One has become a staple of Pete Townsend solo. I can see that. Shows in a fan favorite, which makes sense. Yes, for sure. Beautiful acoustic ballad. But they do mix in some of that classic who sound just to not alienate their fans,


Participant #1:

slide guitar. Again, John and Keith are kind of subdued on this one. I think John probably had a lot of control. He might have wanted to do this one solo. It matches the lyrics in the story because this is Jimmy feeling part of the mods. This is not him breaking down. This is not him starting a ride or something or doing something crazy or fighting with his parents or whatever. This is him. I'm One. I'm one of you guys. And then the music and the lyrics match all together. Now, see, I took it a different way. I thought this was him realizing that he's not a man and he's one with him. He's trying to be an individual. Well, I guess I took it as one of those things where if you tell yourself something enough, you believe it. You're right. Yes. Okay. I can see that he is constantly, because if you look at the lyrics, he's asking people, where'd you get those blue jeans? He looks I'm a Gibson without a case. He's being that phony that The Godfather told that he had to be. So he's like, okay, well, then I'm the one. But I'm not really sure yet. Conflicting thoughts going through as well. All right. Okay. I changed my view at all. I'll join you. All right. Next we got the Dirty Jobs track seven. Dirty Jobs. This one, Keith, is hard at work, judging by the screens that I have listed here. So I've got 12345, six, I've got seven. Keith screams on this one. Oh, wow. He is working overtime. But yeah, the synthesizers into the short violin strokes just kind of brings you right in.


Participant #1:

I'm going to stop. It's just so good. But anyway, yeah. Dirty jobs. Basically, Jimmy is going to work as a garbage man now. That's what I took from the album. In the movie, he never actually goes to work as the garbage man, but what he's realizing is that society looks down upon these folks with the dirty job. So he lists what? Pig farmer, bus driver, miners, etc. Or as he's talking to these other blue collar workers, he actually towards the end, he blames them. Yeah. The lyrics he kind of took a turn for me there, where he's realizing society is going to keep you guys down. It's just kind of the way it is. And they said, but it's your own damn fault. Yeah. If you let them do it to you, you've got yourself to blame. Yeah. So I guess he kind of mentally says, I'm not going to let them do that to me, I guess. Yes. I'm not going to leap again right afterwards. You're right. Yes, that's for sure. It might also signify that he's going to rebel in the future as well. Well, that leads into helpless dancer. Yes. Song ends with pig snorting parade in the background and then yes, Helpless Dancer. The theme of Roger that we talked about earlier. So the tough guy, the Helpless dancer, opens with horns. I don't know if that's kind of, like, supposed to be a revelation. I'm going to get RZ fartsy because that's what Pete was. So let's kind of big deal. This one is stripped down, though, too. Yeah. This one just relies heavily on Roger to do all the heavy lifting. Yes, for sure. He's, again, just powerful, powerful vocalist. So kind of relays Jimmy's hardships.


Participant #1:

Although the other hardships that he's listing, his seem kind of minuscule, in my opinion. I was going to talk about that later. As far as


Participant #1:

to me, and this is coming as a parent, jimmy is a lot of this is just a rebellious, spoiled little brat. Yes. As today's youth would say, first world problem. Yes. Grant his parents aren't the best. They've got their own issues that he details in various lyrics. But he had a job, he had a fun group of friends, he had social life. What's going through his head is largely whatever late teens, early 20s kind of goes through as far as, okay, what am I going to do with my life? Do I grow up and start to be a functioning member of society? Or do I be a deadbeat and try to just party all the time. Yes. And I can relate to Jimmy 100%. I don't know about you, but I think, like you said, a lot of people can. I'd say, as a parent, I smack on the side of the head to head and say, grow up, man. Why were you whining tell 21 year old Luke to not go out and drink when he's got a final exam tomorrow? And he would tell you, screw off. So you can't talk to youth either. They're going to do what they want to do and hopefully they can get a level head. And also there's a lot of drugs in the cell, so he's talking about the blue pills, amphetamines. So that doesn't help any situation that this kid is doing. Yes, agreed. 100%. Jim. Lots of drinking. But you're right, though. He's trying to lump himself in with racial inequality and other issues in this song. And it's like, dude, your problems are not easy. Yeah. Your problems have nothing. I don't know if we're supposed to sympathize with him on that level or see him as delusional. We're supposed to see the pettiness. Yeah, I think for sure, because Pete's not a dummy, he wouldn't have presented that as his point of view. So there are two sides to the story, too. He gets all about if a man is trying to change, but it only causes further pain. So you stop dancing


Participant #1:

again. I think the stop dancing signifies the rebellion again, because this is Roger song. He's a helpless dancer, but he's also a fighter. This is the way I think the dance is the functioning member of society. Yes. So you're helpless, but keep dancing. Do what you're told. Go do the garbage, go to the mail room. Go do those. So what's he going to do? You stop dancing. That's brilliant. Yes, for sure. And he did stop dancing.


Participant #1:

All right, onto the next one. Is it in my head? I have a confession to make. Okay. There are many times when I did listen to this album, though, and I would purposely this is where I started. Okay. And there's a reason I like those first eight tracks. They're all great, but track nine through the end really just kind of it's the start of the breakdown, so it really kind of kicks it into gear with all the motifs start coming to the surface. And each song, obviously, we'll cover, but they're all at a very high level musically. But this is vinyl confession. I would start here. There you go. I apologize. No worries. This is another example of a perfect Tu song. I think you touched on that. But if someone asked what their sound is, this would be one to point them to. For sure. It's got that piano in the background that emphasizes all the themes. Yes. And then just the title alone matches lyrics. As far as he's trying to figure out is this in my head? Is this me? Sure. Am I the problem? Trying to find the real me, if you will? Yes,


Participant #1:

but Keith and John are kind of subdued on this one, too. They're not all over the place. They're keeping a rhythm going. And, dude, John and Keith are still better than a majority of rhythm sections out there. And this is kind of the last and I could be wrong, but to me, this is like the last subdued one before yes, it all happens. Yes. The freight train. There you go. That's pizza. The freight train. Yes. The 515. All right. So, yes, Jimmy sees a man without a problem, but also a country full of starving people and wonders how these can exist simultaneously. So he's kind of reflecting self as well. And all positive points on this song are actually followed by a negative as well. Yes. That shows his self doubt and his paranoia yes. Throughout the song. Yes, anxiety is a modern life. But yes. Back to what you said earlier. I think a lot of people have walked in Jimmy's shoes, if not all people experiencing these things. So he is not unique. But we won't say that yet, because we got to keep the drama going. Right. So it goes into track ten, which is I've Had Enough. And this is, I guess, foremost first breakdown. Yeah, for sure. Is a breakdown. There are so many layers. This is insanity in song form, for sure.


Participant #1:

This was one of my favorites on the album. Yeah, it's definitely yes. Roger his intro shows Jimmy's anger. It's very tense, just beautifully delivered. And then the second part, Pete comes in and actually, we'll see this part again later. And again and again. Yes. You're talking about the jacket and the GS scooter describing all of his mod things. It's very materialistic as things start to crash down around. And he keeps telling himself that, I've got the suit, I've got the scooter, I got the coat. Why is everything breaking down? I'm doing what I'm supposed to do with my fashion. Why is nothing else working? I should have the girl, I should have the money, I should have all of this, but it's not happening. Right afterwards, we get the love rain over me teas. This is kind of signifying Jimmy's need to go back to the sea in Brighton. And then we get a beautiful banjo break. Banjo. And I have it in here. I love the drums on this one. Keith is on point, followed by a frigging banjo. And speaking of Keith, during the banjo part, is he playing a bongo? I believe so. I was going to say I didn't know if it was bongo, if he had some sort of different skin on one of his drum heads. But, yeah, it sounds like with one of his eight arms. There you go. But, yeah, it's very hillbilly and just a knee slapper, for sure. But it's beautiful. It's the who's version of hillbilly. Hillbilly who. We go right back into the tens part. Right after that, Roger hits us again, and guess what happens at four minutes and 8 seconds. I'm going to go with Keith whispers something. Yes. Got another Keith scream. I'm not surprised I missed it in this one. This one has everything going on. It does, yes. But yeah, he's just so powerful. Correct. If I'm wrong, this is the end of the first day. Correct? Yes. Inside, too. Yes. So this is like the first finale. It is, yes. I think he decides that he doesn't fit in with the mods in this song. Maybe not decides, but is realizing that he doesn't. And maybe society in general, maybe he's just seeing himself as an outcast. Anxiety is building up to this point. I'm finished with the fashions and acting like I'm tough, bored with hate and passion. I've had enough of trying to love. Well, you didn't do the roger dollar tree version. There you go. Oh, no. I can't do it. He gives them everything. I didn't realize what he was saying until I read the lyrics. That last word, it's passion. Yes. He says he's bored with hate and passion, but the Hayden passion can come through in that final. That's true.


Participant #1:

Yeah. Like you said, side, too. But I think that we get the hint that he wants to go back home and go to a happy place, story wise. He wants to go back to the one time that he had his high point in his short life, which was the Rumble and Brighton, where the mods had a weekend there. And then the rockers were there with their motorcycles, which I want to talk about the movie for a minute. Okay. How weird was it watching these actual bikers go toe to toe with these scrawny little moths and they were getting their handed to them? Yeah, it was even it was just so weird. Because you think in this day and age I'll use for modern tears, but the preppy guys in their suits and their slick terror versus the guys on the motorbikes in today's aspect, it should have been an ass kicking. I agree. But I think at sheer numbers, the mods were out in numbers, so I think they had that going for them. And earlier in the movie, you see there's a mod by himself trying to fix his bike and the rockers take him out. Yeah. And the mods will leave a man behind. Yes, they will. We're getting chased by a bunch of rockers and our groups are even. But one guy has bike trouble. Hey. Or scooter trouble. Sorry, man, you're on your own. And that leads back to the selfishness, I think, the ego. But fun fact, too, that actually happened. 65 people died. Apparently. There was actually Brighton? Yes. On the beach. I figured there was an actual altercation to go. Small ride, but I didn't know 65 people died. Yes. Terrible. That was on a news headline that I saw somewhere. It might actually be in the Quadropenia booklet here, but yeah, it was an all out brawl, for sure. I'd like to apologize to anyone that actually was a mod. And I'm dogging you guys. I'm going by the album in the movie. So there's a lot of good people out there that were mod. Yes, for sure. And when I said selfish, I meant, stand up,


Participant #1:

please. Do doughnuts with your scooter in my lawn. Yes. That was an excellent point in the movie as well. Oh, man. I actually really enjoyed that. I don't know about you. I did enjoy the movie. All of it. And I loved the scooters because they had to trick out their scooters. How many mirrors can you fit on there? How many stickers? And Sting's bike was the cream of the crop. That was the ace face. Yes. GS on the front. I don't think he said anything in the movie, did he? I don't think he had any lines. I don't believe so. Yeah. Now that you say that he just stood there and stared. No, he did. He had one line. It was in court when he said he was going to write them a check. Right. That was a good scene, too. Yes, it was. That was the perfect line to give a judge, for sure. Yes. And I think that was right when outlandos the Moore that was the first album. Right. The Police. I think that just come out. Right. I did read that when they cast bases based on the Imdv trivia that I was reading when they cast Sting. He wasn't like a household name. Okay. By the time the movie came out, everyone did know whose thing was, at least in the UK, and they were starting to come up as a band. Sure. Fun fact as well. The movie was supposed to be set in 1964, and apparently there were some 70s models, vehicles in some of the shots. Greece was playing at the movie theater, which hadn't come out until much later. They didn't have a license to film anything on the road. So everything that you're seeing on the roads, other than a few things in Brighton with, like, extras, but when they're riding scooters and they're getting wrecked and those little beat up scenes, those are all gorilla filming. They do it before the cops show up. Oh, wow. And another reason is because the helmet laws changed, so they had to film it as if it was 1963. So they had with Jimmy and the Mazda with no helmets. But that was the actual law by the time that they started filming. Got you. All right. That's neat as well. I did not know that. This is all gospel because this was all read on the Internet. Yes. If either of us mispeaks in this, please don't judge too harshly. All right, sure. It might have been covered in that 85 page doctorate, but I didn't get that far. There you go. Well, I'm sure you got some good tidbits from it, anyway. All right, we're starting side three with 515. So 515, I believe. Did they call the trains at or is it supposed to be like, the train's number? I think I'm on the 515, which is the 515 time slot that goes to Brighton. Got you. That makes sense. I'm out of my brain on the 515. Yes. So out of his brain, you can guess that he has taken quite a few of the blues that we were talking about earlier. Yeah. So Jimmy gets everything that he has as far as amphetamines. He takes a whole ton and just goes on the train. And it's like his high trip. He's just saying what he sees. Yes. And actually, the song starts off with, of course, from Cut my Hair. Yeah. Why should I care? Yes. So more multiple personalities coming through. And that makes you think, too. Let's go back to the artsy fartsy. Is this coming from the same personality that we saw in Cut My Hair? Is that what that's supposed to allude to? I think that the four personalities, if we take that as story face value, they intersect. I mean, they're all coming up at different points during multiple songs, so it's not necessarily one song from one personality. You're right. It's it's or cut. Yes, I agree 100%.


Participant #1:

We get the back and forth treatment with the vocals. Again, roger sings apart and then you've got the rest of them yelling back, what did you think of the lyrics? I'm going to read another. This is set in. Yes. I'm not going to say them because I don't want to get me toed, but the Ode Cloning park, this was written from the point of view of a young boy in 1963. So what he's saying? We're not saying what? Anything. So the Ode Cloning, apparently when the Beatles came around, the girls would piss their pants and sit on the seats in the train. No joke. I read them. And the ushers had to spray cologne to get the smell of pee out of the train. That makes sense. He's like, the seats are seductive celibate sitting. There you go. So, yeah, just another little funny. The answers are sniffing EW decloning. Yes. Wow. Just for anyone that has not heard the song, it starts off with Why should I care? In a very subtle tone. And then it kicks off. It completely changes in full who fashion. You got horns in there. You got the jump link in there. And then the lyrics come in with talking about teenage girls way underage sexually knowing. And then it goes like, oh, wow. Okay, this is the train we're on. Okay, again, just that back and forth. Roger saying something and then the rest call. I'll call back to him. I think Pete and John are both singing the high and low harmonies. So inside outside and then inside outside. So one of them is doing it's either Pete and John. I know in concert it was Pete and John, but it might be both of those are Pete in this. So, anyway, one on each channel. If you've got a high fi system, left and right channels, they're both screaming at you from both sides, which is neat. The high harmony is on the right and the lows and the left. In that section of lyrics, he's confused as all hell. He's like moments of clarity during this trip on the train and trip with the amphetamines. But where have I been? He's asking himself like, what the hell is going on? And then there's, I guess, another portion of himself. Tell him I'm out of my brain on the train. Yes. And speaking of Inside outside so another little side note here. I just thought of this. So is this a reference to Beach Boys? Inside, outside, US? That could be, yeah, it could be. That would be a rocker song, though, wouldn't it? I wouldn't see that as a mod song. I don't know. That was another takeaway I had, was coming from our generation, all these different whether it's the Kinks in The Who or the Stones and the Beatles, I lump them all together as classic rock, as we've obviously discussed. But there was that brick wall between them, apparently, with these different groups. So it's just kind of weird in retrospect, from historical fashion, we look at this. That's just good old fashioned rock. Sure. All around. So Beach Boys, I wouldn't know which bucket to put them in because they're just classic rock. Agreed. So, again, I may not be the right person talking about this, but I hope my passion is coming through. I did have a note, though, on this, that it has one of the saddest lyrics to me, which is the Inside nowhere is home. Yeah. The way that is delivered, it's just very sad, very sad to me. Roger does have a very expressive delivery in his vocals. Desperation coming through again. How did these four dudes meet? If fate exists, this was Faith doing, putting these four musicians together. Again, contradictory statements are out. So you got magically bored, you've got free frustration, you've got quiet storm water, you've got tightly undone, sadly ecstatic, uppers and downers. Everything's got a contradiction to it. You're right. Yeah. Alluding to the multiple personalities, possibly again. And just the overall confusion of this young lad. Yeah. So, anyway, Cut My Hair comes back in again at the end. So, actually, this was a single, as we talked about earlier. Bside was a song called Water. It's on Odds and sods it's a B sides album of theirs. And it is so good. If you haven't heard Water, check it out. Roger. I have not. Roger Waters. Roger Daltrey at his finest seriously. Check it out. Passion. He's just grit. Awesome delivery. Anyway, can't say enough about this whole band. Well, okay, then we go into track twelve, which is C and sand. C and sand. I've got a soft spot for this one. So, I know we had a conversation about this a few weeks ago, but I used to make mix tapes for my girlfriends back in college. And this one always made it to the mixtape. Now, I'm not sure if this was the right message. No, not at all. It was Rogers part. The Love parts. That's what I was looking at. My mixtapes were second to none. I'm telling you, it was a ride. So this had to be in there. It was part of as much as I've analyzed these lyrics and the song is right up there. Yeah. I wouldn't send this to a girl. Not if she's listening to the words. Yeah, it's Roger's Words. Roger's Words. All love is a perfect dress. Come on. Who doesn't want to hear that?


Participant #1:

Where's every fashion but knowing it in the context of the album, it changes all. So Jimmy arrives at Brighton, and this quiet seaside town is not what he was expecting or remembers, because he was there during the brawl, during the height of the mod thing. And now it's all just old people. And now all he has left with him is his thoughts. Yes. And he starts questioning everything. Like you said, the girl I love is the perfect dresser. But I am the face that she wants her man to be. Why am I not? Yes. So Ego is coming in again. He thinks that he deserves it. It's intercut with that same my jacket is going to be cut slim. Yes. Rogers parts, more subdued, laid back instrumentally, too, not just lyrically. And then you've got Pete coming in with that Ego Macho part as well. So back and forth once again, just flows seamlessly. I can't say enough about this album. The bass and Lee guitar, those are my notes here. For some reason, I really I had a reason to write that down. But this particular track, the guitar, really kind of crushes it. Oh, absolutely. John and Keith are just hurtling. Freight train is the perfect way to describe the who. They're just hurtling along.


Participant #1:

And I'm the Face, if you want it like you said, it comes back. So earlier I referenced Zoot Suit was their first single, the B side. The zoosuit. Was I'm the face? And if you listen to their B side, it is almost identical to I'm the Face if you want it big and check it out after this as well. But it's lifted from their very first single. So alluding to their Mod beginnings. Once again, so pretty neat. It's also kind of funny that you said this on mixed tape, because the last line is a very important line, which is, nothing is planned by the sea and the sand, so you can't build anything off of that foundation. That's the way I took that. And so he had built this vision of the mod life based on this weekend there, and everything was great, but it was built on sand. And he's realizing that it's all going to go away. Yes. And you sent that to a girl? I did, yes. But it was Jimmy. I was Jimmy. Okay, fair enough. So I was living out his life and let's go back to the movie. So in the movie, the riot happens and he does end up having sex with the girl. That he does. That was his high point. And then right after, it was something that's not in the album, but it is in the movie, where he actually gets arrested in Brighton, and that starts his downfall. Trajectory. Yes. But anyway, parents kick them out and then he quits his job and then he sees we'll get to the girl soon. I'm not sure which track that is. I don't know what the actress's name was, but she played a fantastic girl that was a good choice of actor for her anyway. All right, well, the actor that played Jimmy, I thought did a great job, especially in his trajectory upwards to the peak. He's dancing on speakers and just having a blast doing Donuts in that 1 YD with his scooter because he's all angry. And then his breakdown. He's crazy. He did a good job. Now, do you know how old Jimmy is supposed to be? I know you said early 20s earlier. I don't know what the drinking age stuff was or the legal ages, but he's got an entry level job, so I would say 20 to 22 somewhere in there. Sure. Yeah. I believe it still is to this day. I believe 18 is the drinking age over there. When I went to Ireland for my senior, I graduated from Bradley here in Peoria. So went to Ireland and I was able to drink. Well, I guess if I graduated from college never mind. You didn't graduate from Bradley at 18, did you? No. Ignore that last state. Okay, this is what I'm thinking. My senior trip from high school, we went to Canada. The drinking agent in Canada was 18. Okay, that's where I'm getting mixed up. So anyway, my buddies and I took a trip up to Canada senior year, and it was a blast. But then I went to Ireland when I graduated from college, and it was 18 there as well. They just went to the Illinois Valley. There's no drinking age. Yeah, you're probably right. Got a creep court or manateo. All right, then we go into track 13, which is drowned. Yes, drowned. Another banger right after the end of that one, which was also just rocketing. There's two things that I really love on any album. One is musical transitions. So when one track plays well into another, and that's all over. This album. But what I really like is when the lyrics do not match the music. And when I say that, I mean so Drowned is a jam. It's kind of, I would say uplifting, but it's more of a rocking tune and it's a piano guitar jam. But the lyrics are completely depressing. Yes. And not even a steady downhill dude has now come contemplating suicide. Yes. Drowning. Yes. Hence the name of the song. But, yes, Pete's guitars in this, he's playing multiple guitars. I'm going to play three at any given time. So they're just very free flowing, too organic. It's not like his standard stabbing signature sound. And John actually does get a bass solo, too, in this one, around the two minute mark. So, again, I'm going to say he's their lead guitarist, so I wish they'd turn him up a little bit sometimes. I don't know if it was just the mix on the CD, which was my primary listening device before we started this, I did read that as Pete Townsend is the producer of this album, every single thing to include the Keith Yells everything is intentional. Yes. There were no happy accidents. Everything is there for a reason. Let me find it real quick. So I laughed pretty hard when I read this


Participant #1:

Quadraphenia in its entirety by Pete Townsend. That's what it says in the liner notes. So he was not giving credit to anyone. In its entirety. In its entirety, yes. So sorry, guys. Read directly off the liner notes. Yes. Anyway, but, yeah, like I said, Pete's got more organic, free flowing guitars going. 247. Two minutes and 47 seconds in. You get another call back to 515. With the horns, we get another contradictory statement to let me be stormy, let me be calm. So I don't know, just thematic for sure. I'm flowing under bridges, I'm flying through the sky up or down. Yeah. So the last minute or so, what I've written in my notes is beautiful chaos. It is just so much happening. It's eargasm, it's amazing.


Participant #1:

And I read it as he's wanting to just go to the ocean and die. He wants it all to end. Let me flow into the ocean, take me back to sea. It's sad.


Participant #1:

It is. But can you see it also as his baptism? Like washing all of his cares away into the city? Yes, he is contemplating suicide, but could he also be just needing that release, that redemption? He could be, but I don't see that in the lyrics. Sure. And also, here's another thing. Track one is called I am the Sea. So him becoming part of the sea, maybe that is Drowning. Yeah. And I think that it was meant to be. That first track was the end as far as I Am the Sea. He's remembering everything in that. So we're foreshadowing we're getting his recall. Okay. As he's staring out to see got you. That's the way I took it all right. Because things aren't done for Jimmy as we get into the wonderful track 14 Bellboy. This is just chaos.


Participant #1:

I love Keith Moon. He was just a character. And this is Keith Steam. Yes. Keith Steve theme. And he just barrels in that introductory drum. I'm going to call it a drum solo. It's amazing. Is every Keith part of drum solo, though? One could argue that it's great to hear good old Uncle Ernie. I love it. He doesn't have range much. No, he's just basically talking. It's an exaggerated cockney accent. Yes. Good job.


Participant #1:

You should see me dressed up in my uniform.


Participant #1:

I love it. It's great. Jimmy runs into Aceface, who is played by Sting in the movie, and the guy that he looked up to during that weekend and brightened him and Aceface and the rest of the group, they busted up this hotel, trashed it, and then now he sees that same guy working as a bellboy at that same hotel and it crushes him. It bolts. Crushes him. His hero is no longer a hero. When you watch this on YouTube, it's great seeing someone, like, holding the microphone to Keith as he's doing this cockney thing. Then his left hand, he's not even looking. He's still hitting drums as he's singing to the right in a very, I don't know, Keith Moon fashion. It's just wonderful. Now, you said that everything in this album was intentional, and I'm sure Pete kind of succumb to it, but he originally was very adamant about him not making this a comic song, a comedic song. I think it could be argued that it's not necessarily comedy, but when you hear Keith doing that voice, you got to laugh. Oh, yeah, absolutely. But then he has that retrospective moment where he's like, in the higher pitch. Some nights I still sleep on the beach. So it takes away from the comedy. And then you start to feel sorry for this guy now, too. Yes. Spends his days licking boots for his perks. And you tell me if I'm crazy here. Is there a thermon used in this song or is it just that exaggerated guitar effect that I was referring to earlier? I don't know. It almost sounds like he's got that thermon sound going. And if not, then maybe he looped the guitar part through his synthesizer. But anyway, just very haunting noises happening all over this one, too. And at the end, when Keith is always running at some, pete's guitar actually picks up from there at the same exact tone that he was singing at. And it just extends for a super long time. It's so awesome. And for the time 1973, that was probably pretty unique. I don't know if many other people were experimenting with that kind of technique on that. Did you notice that the digit Jimmy in those lyrics, though? Always running at someone's heel. You know how I feel? Yes. Automatically assuming, like, yeah, you do this, too. You're one of us in this class system and yeah, you know how I feel. And I could just feel that dig at Jimmy. Yes. But it was also hypocrisy because Jimmy was at Ace's heel and now Ace is carrying some rich guy's baggage and the Bellboy was cool with it. He's saying, My secret is I keep it all on the inside. So he's a helpless dancer, is what you're saying. Yes. Okay. Absolutely. He's playing the dance. He's going along with it. Bellboy.


Participant #1:

It's such a great track. It really is. It's fun. It's a blast. That's another note that I made later on for the wrap up. But this album always makes me happy. He didn't want to be complicated, but it is a moment of levity in this dark second half of the album. Sure. And credit to Keith Moon on that. If they would have swapped it and had Pete Townsend singing as the Bell boy, it wouldn't have hit in the same way. I know they did a concert in the 2000s. I'm curious to know who did Keith's part for that. I know Ringo's son is their drummer now, so I don't know if he's taking that part on. Really? I didn't know that. Yeah. That's cool. Ringo is the drummer now? Not Ringo. Ringo sun. Zack Starkey. That's cool. Yeah. So we go from Bellboy to the end of side three, by the way, for the Viking listeners. So you got to flip it. And then we get into track 15, Doctor Jimmy, which is John Antwestle's team. The part isn't me part. Pete described Antwerp as the romantic


Participant #1:

part. Comes in through this. We'll just throw this off right off the bat. So Doctor Jimmy is a reference to Dr Jekyll and Mr Jim is a reference to Mr High. That's right. I think that's kind of what the two parts are. So the Doctor Jimmy part is the mad. No, Doctor Jimmy would be the column, right? Yeah. By the literary reference. Yeah. It only comes out when I drink my gin. Yes. So that would be Mr Jim coming out


Participant #1:

when I drink my gin.


Participant #1:

But anyway, yeah, I think that's kind of what they're going at, too, with the is it me for a moment. And then you've got the other part, which is kind of chaotic and bitter. It's probably the best word for it. He's ready for a fight. He's ready for a fight. He's ready for all kinds of nefarious things. Yes. Rape girls. Yeah. Damn, she's a virgin. I'm going to be the first in. All right, you said it, not me. I'm just querying my graffiti here. But anyway, at this point, his parents threw him out. His girlfriend has chosen another guy now. And that other guy was supposed to be his best friend. Best friend, yes. And he's drinking and using drugs heavily as well, so he's on the brink here. This is where Jimmy loses it. So heavy, chaotic during the break in the middle as well. So another awesome baseline. I think John's tone, again, is what all base players should strive for. If that kind of tone was in some other artists repertoire, I would be much more into the music. Hearing that on top of it just adds a layer. So I mentioned music transitions earlier, and this one when I was doing First Time through, I didn't know the tracks, and they have teased Love Brain over me many times throughout the whole album. I thought that was next. I felt that that was going to be the next track as it transfers into track 16, the rock I was expecting because you hear some ocean and I'm just in a little bit of rain, and then I was expecting those piano chords of Love and Over Me. But instead you're treated to an outstanding drum intro. Yeah, it comes at you. Just we're not done yet. I loved it. I think The Rock might be my favorite track on the album.


Participant #1:

Well, I think the reason they did that was so that they could actually include Dr. Jimmy in that song. Because really, if you and Doctor Jimmy and just do the three in the rock, you're not going to get that fourth track in there. So in order to get all four in the Rocket, this is the undershirt, really. Yeah. This is that other instrumental that encompasses all the themes. It's starting to wrap everything up, I guess, in the story. Jimmy steals a boat and he starts heading out to sea and he is going towards this rock, or he's on the rock rock in the middle of the sea. So basically an island, obviously not inhabited by anyone, but yes, I'm going to call it his happy place, the city. I think that's where at this point, he cleans. A rough word, but he's detoxed, like everything has. Because at the end of Dr. Jimmy, he's looking for something else, something else to stronger, something to hold me down, something he doesn't have it. So he goes out to sea and then when he gets there, he's no longer drunk, he's no longer high. It's just him and his thoughts and that's it. Yes. But anyway, again, Pete uses the top box here, too, so he's saying Love Rain over Me, actually over the top of the bellboy riff. So really neat. And like you said, this is a good favorite to choose. Everything is in this song. The music goes over all the range of emotions that Jimmy has felt all through the album. Yes. And it ends super abruptly and then the storm begins. And then you get those chords. Yes.


Participant #1:

Everyone's very familiar with the song, I'm sure.


Participant #1:

I can't think of a better album closer than Love Rain or Me. I think it's pretty perfect, especially when you listen to the whole thing, because it feels earned. It's not just a good song on the radio. He's getting to this point. And the emotion in this song is earned throughout the entire story. Yes, it's definitely a goosebumps song, for sure. We should mention this is Pete's theme, if you didn't remember that from her earlier. But, yeah, it opens with that piano part that has been teased throughout the entire album. And then come the violins that everyone knows and loves. And speaking of vocal delivery for Roger, just perfection. He starts with that sincere vocal delivery. I don't know if he does this kind of delivery very often. It sincere is a good word for it. It's just very yeah. When you think of The Who, you don't really think of ballads. Yeah. You think of the band as a whole in a jam session. Something rocking. I can see from aisles, who are you? Bluestoons, stuff like that. You don't think of a ballad where only love. It starts out so subtle, only love.


Participant #1:

But then, yes, we get that gut scream again. It's heart wrenching, his scream on the word love. Each time he does it, it gets even more impactful.


Participant #1:

And I don't know how he didn't ruin his voice throughout the years. I wouldn't assume that he did not go into the studio the next day. Probably needed a day. But doing it in concert night after night after night after night, just crazy. Again. These four dudes something else anyway. And the guitar solo almost sounds desperate as well. That's a good word. Yeah. It's got emotion. It's almost like it's telling you a story. So beautiful. It really is. Anyway, I think Jimmy kind of lets go of all those external influences and desires and tries to look internally to find himself at this point. But it does kind of end ambiguously. How do you think it ends? I don't know. I don't think he killed himself, but I don't think he drowned as referring to a previous song. But I think he found redemption. I think he became one with the ocean. I think he might be on his path to find the real me. This is one of the few moments on the album where there is a little bit of hope in the lyrics. Yeah. And it's hard to say. I mean, they obviously left an ambiguous for a reason. And they did in the movie, too. Also ambiguous. Yeah. We didn't actually get to see Jimmy go out to the Rock in the movie. He threw a scooter off the cliff. Yeah. I hate to break this moment that we're having here about the song, but my favorite part was when Jimmy pulled his own keys out of his pocket and started the scooter with it. It worked. Yeah. So, anyway, just another little thing from the movie that was quite humorous. Let me ask you this. Did you watch the movie with subtitles? No. I'm pretty good at deciphering cockney accents. No, I needed that subtitle. I'd like to rewatch it with subtitles because I'm sure I missed some good parts. That scene where he wrecks his scooter and he gets hit by a truck. Yes. And he's arguing on the curb with the guy that hit his scooter and that is some crazy gibberish.


Participant #1:

Yes, it is. It's like Brad Pitt and snatch. Yes, it is. You have no idea. You like bags. Why did you say it's from your yes. There you go. Anyway, but yeah, I don't know. Again, let's get back to that beautiful way to end the album. Yeah, we've definitely covered every aspect of the album. It's just fantastic. If anybody out there has not listened to this, please do so. This is a beautiful album. Yes, for sure. And I don't know, for my closing notes here, first note I said was, who's putting music out like this? Who has since then and who is now? I've also got a list over on the other side of my computer here of other concept albums. What was the my Chemical Romance? The Black parade. Yes. And to me, that's the only one that has come close and achieved a beautiful concept album. It's not a two disk one, it's twelve tracks, but it's definitely there. But through doing this podcast, I'm going to go with also the flaming lifts the soft bulletin. Love that album, too. Yes. And it was through talking with Jack through that album, I didn't realize the concept of talking with him about it like The Black Parade is about death, but in a more, oh, I don't know, depressing route. Whereas The Flaming Lips, they did it in a more uplifting thing, uplifting point of view on it. Yes. So a few that I have on my list. Have you heard of the Decemberists? Yeah. The Hazards of Love. If you have not heard that one, it is a concept album to the fullest extent. There is a whole play happening in musical form, so fantastic album. I wouldn't compare it to Quadrafenia by any means. Love The December. So I'm not trying to bash them here, but it doesn't touch Quadrofinia instrumentally. They do a great job, too, they've just got a different style. And I do like the more folksy stuff, but yeah, Quadrupedino will always be top three for me, for sure. So Mars Volta, Delasty, Mccomiterium and Francis the Mute Their first two albums were both concept albums. And Dilasta.com, I could do a show on them, too, or on that album. John Preschanti from the Chili Peppers was the guitarist. Flee was the bass player from Chili Peppers as well. But yeah, Mars Voltage just has such a unique sound. Layer wise, I think that one might approach Quadrophinia. And you've referenced The Kinks a couple of times in this podcast. So Village Green preservation Society lola versus Power Man preservation Acts one and two. They had a couple of good ones, too. They approached music with humor as well. Kind of like Keys, I think from a production standpoint, you've got the top three in any random order. You got Tommy Quadrafini in the wall. Those three set the standard for a concept album, and that's hard to beat. Many have tried and failed. As far as a failure, Sticks Killer was here come to mind. I wouldn't call it a complete failure. Some good track record, but it definitely did not reach the heights they were shooting for. Or at least the young was shooting for. Duma. Artigato. Mr. Obade. Come on. I had a friend in the army who was real big into. I think it was Queen Strike and Operation Mine crime. Okay, silent License is the only thing I know of them. And same here. I tried to listen to Operation Minecraft, and it just didn't click with me at the time. But he swore up and down that this is better than The Wall.


Participant #1:

Another one I have on my list, loosely. And you can say that about any of his albums. Trent Rezner nine inch nails downward spiral fragile. Year Zero is one of my all time favorites from him. That's great. Yeah. Year Zero is speaking of another anniversary coming up, so I believe it's 15 years, so we should be getting a reissue on that one this year as well. So got Pete's lifehouse. See, I'm nerding out about that. I can't wait. Like I said, who's next is fantastic. But, yeah, we've got Year Zero coming, too, so two of them. So you've already done one episode. You gave us a short list, but what's another group of albums that you would have like to talk about? What's another short list for you? Oh, man, there are so many. But I said I could do one on Delass in the comic, orium for sure, Blind Melon self titled, or Soup as well. Love. Love, blind Melon. Anything? Pearl Jam. The reason I didn't choose Pearl Jam from my first episode was because one of your buddies had already done verses, which was a great choice. I probably would have chosen Riot Act, but that was because those were my formative years for music when I discovered that one, and that was really my introduction to them. Yes, I knew the stuff off a ten versus vitality, but really got into them during the right act years. I could just baffle all night. I'd come up with 50 different albums that I could talk about, but Queens of the Stone Age songs for the Deaf. That's another big one. Yeah, that's a good one. Yeah. Anyway, so I do have a question for you that I've got here. I know we've gone for quite long here, so when did you find the real you? The real me? Find the real me. When do you really think that? This goes back to our previous conversation about does everyone really go through what Jimmy's going through? Is he kind of overly traumaticizing? His experience? I kind of subscribe to the philosophy that everyone lives three lives. You got your childhood, you've got your adolescence, and you got your adulthood, and the transition points are always different per person. I kind of had a weird one because my childhood pretty much ended at basic training forcefully at 18. So that was a completely new life, new world that I stepped into. And so my adolescence for a good ten years of the army was at 20. I was a sergeant, had my own team. I had people underneath me training them to do things, not to die. That's pretty intense. Yeah. And then less than a year after getting my stripes, september 11 happened, and just shit got real. And then you throw in some trips to Iraq and stuff like that. So that was my adolescence. So it was kind of weird. I was forced into those roles by choice. By choice. I'm not playing. I mean, I gave the army all the credit in the world, but definitely the current me was when I got out of the military and decided on Atlanta, moved here, started my actual civilian career, met my wife, all that stuff. That's who I am today. In that transition was around 607. Okay, and how old were you at the time? 26. Okay. I'd say later. 20s is kind of when I found myself too, and I don't have an awesome story to tell like that, unfortunately. So when I turned 20, I started drinking a lot. Well, that goes with the army. That's kind of implied with the army, but I think you've kind of got to go through that kind of stuff. So getting your heart broken, I think that's huge. Like, really broken. I'm not talking about just a bad little break up that you feel bad for a few weeks, and then you're on to the next one. I'm talking really heart wrenching. I can't do anything the next day after this kind of thing. You need your heart broken. You need to get shit on at work. You need friends to betray you. I think that's everyday stuff, that's what kind of defines and it may sound negative, but those are negative things. But I think they do kind of form what you do become, and you can either choose to be bitter about it, or you can find other ways to focus your energies. And that's why I look down on Jimmy, because of how he reacts to these things. I mean, sure, these things are petty. Yes. They're things that every kid goes through. You got a shitty job. Everyone does in their 20s. Tough it out, man. You got to move up the ladder. Your girl is not your girl. Well, you were trying too hard. Sounds of it. Sure, he made it. Too many mixtapes. He read the lyrics. There you go. All the stuff that he experiences, everybody does. I mean, now I'm married with kids, so the days of pre marriage where me and my buddies were out at the bar a couple of times a week doing that stuff. That was all fine. That was fun. I look back on it fondly, but I don't regret having a wife and kids now I have a whole new set of adventures. My kid was just in Willy Wonka and it was fantastic. He's seven years old on the stage. I loved every minute of it. Yeah, it was great. And he wants to be on Broadway someday. Absolutely, man. Let's do this. And I wouldn't give up any of this just to have someone early twenty s to think that, oh, just because of a few knocks of normal life, your life is over and the good days are passed. No, man.


Participant #1:

He was talking to a doctor at the beginning. That's a pretty shitty doctor.


Participant #1:

Let me say this. I don't think that he had any sort of mental illness. I think that he was just a kid going through normal kids stuff and through his own decisions. Through his own decisions, he just progressively made things worse. Sure. I'd like to think that Jimmy moved on, went to the military, found himself a wife and his kids in Willy Wonka. That's how I think the whole thing ended. He absolutely could have because we talked about this too. I think telling a 20 year old door, someone in that vicinity, telling them what to do is not going to work. You can tell them, Stop smoking. No, screw you. Stop drinking something. So I think that ego. He had that kind of and you know what? My senior year of high school, I had that same attitude I did. I was the one going into the computer system and changing my grades. Sure. We actually stole the paper that the report cards came out on and we printed our own report card. There you go. Yeah. I didn't give a shit. Just invincible. Sure. And I will be honest, the army knocked all that out of me. And not through what you see on the movies and television of just fall in line or you got to push up. That stuff is there. It was more having a team, having people report to you. So if you are ready to deploy tomorrow, these guys, they are your responsibility. And that stuff is definitely awakening for a 20 year old. Changed my entire outlook. So when I'm out drinking with people in the military, I'm thinking, okay, how do I get these guys home? Sure. These young idiots. And I'm 20. There you go. For sure. I'm still literally underage drinking with my platoon, and I'm thinking, I got to help get these kids home. So that was just weird thinking when you look back on it, when I'm not even able to drink myself. And then I've made plenty of mistakes in those early years. I don't know, I just always think that there is just better it's all about personal responsibility and the decisions you make. Agreed 100%. But put yourself back in those 18 year old shoes. Jimmy never had that military training. But he could have. Yeah, he could have. I mean, you made the wrong decision. I didn't join the military out of any patriotic duty or spree decor or nothing like that. I joined because I didn't want to pay for college. That was my reasoning. Now, through the military, I developed an extreme love of my country, and I'm very proud that I did all that. But that wasn't the initial I'm not going to fake it. And that wasn't my initial reason. It was just, Holy shit, college cost. What are you, a Tool fan? Yeah. Maynard will admit that same thing to achieve what you just said. So he'd be joined in the military because he wanted to go to art school? I believe it was art school. It's been a while since I've looked at it. Took me ten years. I finally used that college money, so I've got the degrees. I did it all and very happy with my decisions. And if there is some psychologists out there that's actually listening to this and wants to come at me, oh, mental illness is real. Of course mental illness is real. People have legitimate things. My personal opinion as a network engineer of false things, I just think that Jimmy was overreacting and he couldn't deal, whether it was through his own bad decisions or the drugs and the alcohol that he was just shoving down his throat the entire time. Because you can't make good decisions when you're doing that stuff, plain and simple. I can almost point to alcohol for every bad decision I've made. I'm in the same boat by cheers to that. I'm having a coffee and whiskey. Just coffee on my end. I'm hopeful that he came out of this album on the right side. I'm going to tell you that. We're going to leave on a positive note here. Jimmy is doing well. He's watching his kids in the Willy Wonka Theater. He's grown up. He's realized the mistakes he made in his youth. It is so cool to see your kid on stage doing a full musical. It was great. Hey, I want him to do Tommy. That would be great. You know there's a theatrical release of that, correct? Yeah, but I don't think it's quite at the junior level. This is Willie Walker Jr. Have him bring it back once he gets to junior high school. I haven't even showed him the movie yet. I'm not prepared to say because he's a very inquisitive thing. This kid is pointing out the plot holes in Harry Potter. We're only at the end of book one, and I don't want him to start asking, who's the acid queen? There you go. Who's Uncle Ernie? Fiddle about. Fiddle about. Pete is not afraid to touch those issues by any means. I think he's had. His issues as well. It was for research, right? Yes. We won't touch on that. But he's still alive. Two of his bandmates can't say that this is true. This is true. Let's see. So before I wrap this up, do you want to tell our listeners anything you're working on or they could find you or anything you want to pitch? No. But as I did last time, I'm going to leave you with this. Unlimited Love by the Red Hot Chili Peppers Go out and buy it. Holy Quinn. When did that come out? Last month? Yeah. Just a few weeks ago. Maybe two weeks ago. But anyway, holy cow. John Frostanti is back. Good man. And one of the few bass players that approaches John and whistle's greatness flees. Outstanding. Yeah. Yes. Oh, man. And this is his album. He shines. All of them do. For 60 year old dudes still rocking and rolling. It is a stellar, stellar album. Check it out. It is awesome. Is this on the level of blood sugar sex magic? I would say yes. They do approach some of that older funk, and it's done perfectly. John has said in interviews that he tried to let his ego go for this one. And in the past, he was doing ten part harmonies. He was doing five guitar solos looped on top of each other, which is what I loved about those albums, by the way. California kitchen and stadium arcadia. John's production on those is why I enjoy those so much. But that attention to detail is still there in the new album. It's just not as over the top. So this is kind of just a straightforward funk rock. Amazingness. I don't know how to describe it. You just gotta give it a shot. It is so awesome. Last time I promoted PJ harvey, what was that called again? Unlimited Love. Unlimited Love by the Red Hot Chili Peppers And check it out. Yes. And speaking of, it is also it's not a double album on the CD, but it's a double album vinyl wise, and that's how they're describing it. So it's a long 117 tracks.


Participant #1:

Well, Luke, I would like to thank you for your time today. It was a pleasure to sit and talk with you about The Who's Quadruphenia. Absolute pleasure. I had a blast. Anytime you want to do this, I'm back. If you want to do a mixtape, I love song. Mixtape. Podcast. I'm in. You know who to contact. I want to recommend a podcast for you called Playlist Wars. I've never heard of this. Oh, they're either good guys. The podcast community is pretty tight. I've met a lot of people this way. A lot of music podcasters out there. There's two podcasts I've listened to a lot with. Podcast wars and soundtrack your life. Soundtrack Your Life. He's actually going to come on our show and do an album. He talks with people about movie soundtracks. Old famous old brother arthur Airheads Empire Records. Nice. It's an enjoyable show. And then Playlist Wars, they have like, okay, we're going to do a Red hot Chili Pepper show. And these two guys, they bring their playlists and then the fans vote, which 1. That is a very cool concept. Yeah, it's really entertaining. And you get a lot of I never heard that one. Let me check that one out. Okay. I will definitely look that up, for sure. All right. Thank you for listening to Music rewind a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. As I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time.


Participant #1:

A podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. Back to you. Even can.


A list provided by Luke Bouris of all the Keith Moon Screams on the album. Guest provided list of all the Keith Moon Screams you can hear if you listen closely when listening to the full album of Quadrophenia. (Time stamps are on the album, not the podcast episode)

The Real Me

0:56

Cut My Hair

0:41

1:48

2:30

2:42

The Punk And The Godfather

2:03

The Dirty Jobs

0:55

1:36

1:58

2:39

2:58

3:14

3:17

I’ve Had Enough

4:08





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