top of page

Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Stephen Epley

Updated: Sep 5, 2022

An Album To Benefit Preservation Hall And The Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program.


Show Notes and Transcript

In the Season 2 finale, Music Rewind welcomes regular host Stephen Epley in the hot-seat to discuss 2010’s Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s “An Album To Benefit Preservation Hall And The Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program.”


Alan Ziegler of our Season 1 Band on the Run episode returns to host this episode and find out why New Orleans Jazz holds a special place in the heart of our regular host.

https://bit.ly/Preservatin_Hall


Album: Preservation: An Album To Benefit Preservation Hall And The Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program Artist: Preservation Hall Jazz Band Year: 2010

Listen to the album on Spotify https://open.spotify.com/album/6cEJvMY405l9wQsRvfYxoT?si=2IAedFVISQ-JAhfJensO6Q

—--------------------------------------------------

New Intro Music by Bryce Evans: Sin's a Good Man's Brother https://bryceevansmusic.com/music

@bryceevansmusic on Instagram

—--------------------------------------------------

Gotham Cigars: Use this link to get up to 40% Cigar Specials at Gotham Cigars. Proud sponsor of Music Rewind.

https://bit.ly/MusicRewind_GothamCigars

—--------------------------------------------------

Buy Me A Coffee: buymeacoffee.com/musicrewind

—--------------------------------------------------

ZZounds Music. The best place for all your music needs. Guitars, Amps, Keyboards, Mics, Soundboards, everything! Shop here to help the show. https://www.zzounds.com/a--3978729

--------------------------------------------------

Drizly Delivery. Your favorite beverage is delivered right to your doorstep. Use Drizly to get beer, wine or liquor without the hassle of leaving the house. 21 and over only. https://drizly.sjv.io/rewind

—--------------------------------------------------


Transcript as follows:


Participant #1:

Hello, and welcome to season two of Music Rewind, a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host, Steve Epley, and in each episode, I will invite a guest on to tell us about their favorite music album, how they discovered it, and what makes it special to them. Hang on, Steve. Sorry to interrupt. Actually, today I am your host. My name is Alan Ziegler. You may remember me from such classic episodes as Band On the Run Episode One, Season One. And you might remember me also from the classic Rock Roundtable. So today we will be officially closing out season two by flipping the script again and putting your regular host in the hot seat. Steve is the host of Podcast, Music Rewind and Cinema Decon, and also the creator of the Sidereal Media "Mogul" Group. Welcome, Steve. Thanks for being on the show. It is a pleasure to be here, Allan. We're so glad you could be here today. Yeah, I always find myself here. Thank you for coming back to play host again because, you know, at the end of season one with our Animals episode, always a pleasure to help out a family member and friend. You can be a family member and friend at the same time, right? Yeah, I think you can be both. Absolutely. Okay. Our Animals episode is our number one episode. By the way, it reached over 1000 downloads recently, which is crazy. I can't say enough about I'm so glad that we did that because I literally lost that album in my Pink Floyd journey. I really did. And, I mean, since that episode, I've probably listened to that album probably ten times. I probably didn't listen to it ten times ever. I literally, for some reason, it just fell off my radar, and I'm so glad that we did it. Pretty soon, they're coming out with that rerelease of Animals, and it sounds awesome. Can't wait to hear the full album. I saw it on vinyl. I already saw it on vinyl. Yeah, it's on the Christmas list. Yes. I'm sure Sam will bring that to you. All right, so you might jump into this. What album are you bringing to the table, and how did you discover it? Today I would like to talk about the album Preservation by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.


Participant #1:

The title subtitle of this album is actually an album to benefit Preservation Hall and the Preservation Hall Music Outreach Program. For anyone out there that wants to get persnickety on the music title, this may be a curveball for you, Allen. I didn't know if you were into this sort of music, but this is something that is definitely special to me and something that I discovered in my adult life much further past my teenage years. Believe it or not, I listen to some jazz. Some people might pigeonhole me as a classic rock guy, which probably am, but I'll listen to anything once. And I've listened to this type of jazz before. I actually had a music appreciation class, I guess I could say the years. It was like the late eighty s and in college, and the teacher was into this type of New Orleans style, Dixieland style, I guess you might maybe call this right, that type of jazz. So he played a lot of this for us, and I was surprised at how much I really liked it. So I don't really go to this like a go to type thing, but I enjoy it when you get to hear it. And this type of music, live especially yes, is fantastic. Yeah, live has a lot to do with why I listen to this album and why I always return to it. If Animals was my Rock out angry album, this album is my happy place. Yeah. I mean, there's safe the stories behind how I found it, how I love jazz, and actually how it coincides with my wife and Michelle, and how we visited New Orleans several times and ended up getting married there. It all comes back to this album. But this album is kind of central in all of that. So did someone turn you onto this type of music, or did you discover it when you were there? I discovered it over time as far as jazz, and that stems back to Harry Connor Jr. For me. So when I was in the service, I picked up several Harry Connor Jr. CDs just because they were there and I liked it. I just really kind of dug his music, his solo piano stuff, and I took him for the newest version of Frank Sinatra. He's a crooner. But then the more I listen to his stuff, especially the stuff you don't hear in Harry Met Sally or other places, his roots come from New Orleans. And I wanted to figure out more, I wanted to find out why. And then I discovered Harry Konick's big band concert. I had the DVD and the CD, and in that particular concert he's got this full swing and band. I mean, they're awesome. And I didn't know it at the time, but I'm watching pretty much the who's who of New Orleans legends, and they all played with Harry when he was a kid. He was playing piano as a kid off Bourbon Street at the Maze Burbank, and he would meet all these jazz guys who were sometimes 1020 years older than him, and he became friends with them all, created this fantastic band. So you got guys like Craig Klein, who now plays in Bonarama, Shannon played the drums, and Leroy Jones on trumpet, lucian Bobrin on trombone, all these guys that were just if you were in New Orleans, you would know those names by heart because they're all local legends and they all play at the Preservation Hall. So through walking that lineage down, I found the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Like, okay, well, these guys sound cool. And then life took over and I never really dug too deep further. Right. And then several years later, I'm out of the army and my brother Tony and I start going to Bonnero. And the very first Bonaroo went to they had a New Orleans tent and I dropped Tony in there. He didn't want to go in there, but it was air conditioned in there, so I was able to pull him in. But he enjoyed it once we went in there because in there we got to see Trombone Shorty, we got to see Galactic. Oh, nice. It was just fantastic. But that in there was the first time I saw the Preservation Hall Jazz Band on stage. Okay, so how does that work? Preservation hall has a house band where all kinds of music greats come in and they have regular shows. But then the Preservation Hall has a touring band which sometimes they do sit down shows there when they're in town. But they're the ones going out, doing the festivals, they're the ones recording albums, at least these days. The Preservation Hall, to take a step back, it's this little building of St. Peters in the middle of the French Quarter and they had two shows a night now. And you go there and you just kind of wait in line and then you go in there. It's really just a tiny rickety building built in the it was an art gallery for a while, the art gallery. People started having live jazz in the corner and then the jazz band ended up being more popular than the art. So it gradually transitioned into a music hall. And then on a trip to New Orleans at one time, the Jaffe family, they stayed in New Orleans, started to manage it, ended up buying it. And now their son, Ben Jaffe, he owns it and he's also the tuba player in the touring band. Wow. So he grew up, literally grew up in that hall with all these music legends and now he's part of the band. That's awesome. It's really cool. So how does this music speak to you? Was it lyrically or just the music or the production or the sound? What is it about this music, do you think, that really drew you in? It's the music and instrumentation, the way they do jazz. So to see them on stage is one thing, but when you actually go to Preservation Hall in that tiny little building on all of our trips to New Orleans, michelle and I would go there. We'd be first in line. We would wait an hour to be first in there. Because if you can you actually sit on cushions right in front of the band. You got to watch out for the trombone player. It'll smack you in the nose. It's great. You are right there and intimate. It truly is. And you get to see these guys and that was the first time I really kind of saw real live jazz, whatever you want to call it. New Orleans jazz, Dixieland jazz, trad jazz, depending on who you talk to, there's kind of different names for it. But for sake of consistency, we'll say New Orleans jazz. It wasn't what I was expecting because I was kind of expecting more modern New York jazz. Miles Davis style. Right, yeah, exactly. But this is not that. And it's much more with jazz. Every instrument, they have their time to shine when they play, but they're playing together, whereas modern jazz, everybody's kind of on their own, and that may be far reaching. There could be jazz fans out there, listen that are ready to come through the iPhone, but that's just the way they're always doing. So, one more thing. As Michelle and I were engaged and she asked me to kind of educate her on New Orleans music, because by this point, I had CDs, I had albums, I had plenty. And right about that time was when this album came out and I was just overjoyed a brand new Preservation Hall album, I got it right away. And it was something different, because it was not just the band and all these amazing guest singers on every single track and guest instrumentalists in the band sprinkled throughout and it was just amazing. So you've got Dr John on one, you got Merle Haggard, you got Jason Isbelle, you got all these great singers and every song is so different, but yet all in the same field that you could be sitting in that Preservation Hall where they recorded all this and just having a hell of a time. Say, it's my happy place. Yeah, this music, I don't know how to creatively describe it, but it just makes you feel happy when you listen to it, gets your toe tapping, it makes you smile.


Participant #1:

Yeah. I don't know what the word is, but you feel good inside for some reason, for whatever they're doing, however they're doing it, I'm listening to it, thinking, yeah, I'm smiling, this is cool. I like, I'm bouncing, I'm tapping my feet. It's just a feel good music. You're right, you can't not tap your feet. Listen to these songs. You may not be dancing up a storm, but you're moving a little bit. It's just so engaging. So, this album, how does it flow to you? Do you listen to it straight, real? Or do you skip tracks? How does that work for you? This album can kind of work two ways. It is definitely one you can put on straight through, but this is definitely one that I can hit shuffle and just enjoy the hell out of it. Yeah, you can, because there's really not a I don't want to say a specific flow, but with each different artist, they bring their own feel to it. So, yeah, you're right. It's kind of you could skip around shuffle easy. Yeah, it doesn't really follow that standard thing, which we've talked about a lot on the side, where tracks five and six, you want to get your banger in there. They're not caring about that. They're just caring about the individual tracks, and it doesn't matter where they fall. I do have my go to songs here and there, but really every song on this album I can listen to. I don't have a need to skip any. You want to go through a track by track, or do you want to just talk about your favorites? I think we can walk through it. Okay. With the people involved on this album, I think they're all worth a mention, at least to get their names out there, because it's really just a fantastic album. I agree. I like it a lot. One last story, though, about the Preservation Hall right after the wedding sorry, like a day or two before the wedding. We spent the week in New Orleans, and when my parents came out of town, I brought my dad to Preservation Hall. And we were there early, front row, just as normal. And I'm talking with Tony on one side. Tony, Nick. And then Michelle is talking to my dad. And all of a sudden, Michelle hits me and she points my dad's talking to Dick Van Dyke. Oh, wow. Dick Van Dyke was him and his daughter walked up to the front. They knew the owners or whomever. They just kind of swayed there, and my dad just strikes up a conversation with them. And this was in 2013. I don't know what they talked about. We have to ask him. I'm sure he told me, but I just don't remember. But eventually more and more people started noticing. Hey, Dick. And Dikes there. So his daughter waved inside, like, hey, can we get him in there? So he got to go in early and sit down on the side. But during the show, at this point, he was either in his late 80s, if not early 90s already. I don't know how old he is now, but you look over there, he's jamming away. He's having a great time. That's great. Again, it goes back to whatever this music does to you. It just makes you want to clap and tap your feet, even if you're 80 something years old. To take a dig at my dad, you ask him, hey, remember when your son got married in the Orleans? Like, yeah. That's when I met Dick Van Dyke. That was his highlight. But it's really great because no song you hear in New Orleans is played the same way twice. And that's the same because all these songs that we're going to go through, the majority of them are city standards. If you've got the same group positions playing the same song, put them in the same room, they're going to hear a whole different version. And it's magic that they got these hollow yeah. Night after night, they're going to play a different version. Even though they're the same guys, they've done the song a hundred times, it's going to be different. They're going to improvise a little differently. You're going to hear a little this, you're going to hear a little that, just to keep it fresh. So for track one, I thought that that was a perfect track to start with. It represents everything that the album's about to do. Yeah. It starts out swinging. It just starts out swinging with this upbeat tune that I would say it's my favorite on the album, but it grows on you, especially after the first 30 seconds. You don't realize it, but you're into it.


Participant #1:

Yeah. It's only like three minutes long, but to me, it encompasses the entire what's to come on this album. It's, shake it and break it featuring Andrew Byrne and Lucian Bobrin on trombone Lucian bobbern is one of the Harry Connor Jr. Guys. Okay. There was one time we went to the hall and we were first in line, and I'm just standing there and I turn to my left and it's Lucian Bobburn standing there. Nice. And I was like, Michelle, look who it is. She didn't know. What do I do? I was meeting to me, a famous musician that I had listened to 100 times over. So I was like, hi, Mr. Barbara, I'm a big fan. Can't wait to see you tonight. He shook my answer. Thanks. He's like, Come here. Come New Orleans off and this is a little bit of small talk. And then someone comes from across the street, hands them a drink, and then they went inside. I was like, it was like the highlight of my night. That's awesome. Look up Lucian Bobber and trombone on YouTube. There's some great stuff out there. He's really a fantastic trombone player. Okay. And he's actually on more songs in this album than I thought he was. He guesss a lot. Really. Okay. Anything else on this song or you want to go check, too? It's neat that they give a shout out to the jazz legend Jelly Roll Morton in there. Where they're like, my jelly. Oh, yeah, that's a nice not so subtle shout out to him. I forgot about that. So the song, too. The devil in the deep blue sea yeah. Heavy title.


Participant #1:

So this is another fun one, but they comes down a bit on the tempo, but it's a good tune along with Lucian Barbara. And you've got Charlie Gabriel on clarinet on this one. And I'll keep saying it whenever I come across him, but another local legend, Charlie Gabriel, just released his own kind of solo album and he's in his 80s. Good for him. Yeah, it's got a nice solo clarinet on this song. Yeah. The featured singers, I'll probably butcher this, but Paolo and Neutini. So I don't know if I said that right, but I'm sorry. Sounds good. Well, I like it yeah, it was. Good song. Good song. But track three is really where things start to get good on this album as far as it's almost like a left turn, because now you got Tom Waits singing 2D. Ma was a big, fine thing,


Participant #1:

which is just fantastic. It's great. I didn't even know it was Tom. Wait until I looked it up. So when I went through this album, I went through it and made my notes. And what I wrote for this song is you believe this guy's voice? You believe what he's telling you? And I didn't know it was time wait until I looked it up. But it drew me in his voice and the way he's singing it, I mean, I totally believe everything he was saying about this song. It was a great vocal to me.


Participant #1:

Are you familiar with the Mardi Gras Indians at all? Yes, I think I watched a special, like, a documentary on those guys. So this is a song that kind of traces back to them and their unique style of singing and performing. They'll perform it as they're walking the streets in their fancy costumes and stuff, which looks awesome when you see it. But Tom wastes, he just nails it. It just fits right in. Yeah. This is one you'll hear often when you go to New Orleans. This is a very fun song and easily one of my favorites on the album. Nice. So track four. Louisiana fairytale.


Participant #1:

So, yeah, here you've got Jim James of My Morning Jacket singing. And this is another one of my favorites. Okay. I didn't realize that he sings with that style of and I'm sure it's got a name, but with the big megaphone. Is it a megaphone? That's what it sounded like to me, too. Kind of scratchy on purpose with a little bit of the echoey sound. Exactly. Very like, I would say, old school, 40s or 50s recording where they were. I'm assuming this is what they're trying to do. Like, when they all would just be around one microphone. Vaudeville style. Yeah. No levels. The guys who played louder were farther away from the microphone and the guys who were softer were in front, and then the singer would be there. So the singer would maybe project a little bit more than you did during the rehearsal. You'd get a little bit of that distortion. That seems to me like what they were doing here with this megaphone trick. It's as simple as can be, and it works. Yeah, I agree. I think it's a pretty cool song. And again, these songs, to me, I'm not a musical scholar, but I don't know how to describe some of the they're very compact, these songs. Three to four minutes usually is it so there's a lot going on. But a lot of the instruments, to me, sound not the same. But they're using the same instruments on each song. But it's hard to kind of get like a musical what's the word I'm looking for to describe it? It's just all the songs are great. They're just like right there. Everybody's doing what they're supposed to be doing and they sound wonderful to me. And that's what I love about the Tragaz of New Orleans, is that the guys in the band, I said earlier, they each get their time to shine on a song. And when they do, there's such respect from the other guys of the band. Yeah, they all lay back. Exactly. And they let the other guy have his 30 seconds. Not very long. If it's time for the clarinet solo, everybody, like I said, a lean back clarinet dude will stand up and he'll give an amazing solo. That is just how he feels. It's not like a written solo every single time. It's truly just how they feel. And if he wants to play a little longer, he plays longer. If he only wants to play just a couple of notes, then sit down, then he does it, and then everybody kicks right back in. All with the beat and the rhythm of the music and nobody misses anything. It's wonderful. You could tell all of these guys, obviously, the guest singers are brand new to it as far as the group, but the musicians in the background or why I love this album. Before we were married and Michelle asked me to educate her on some jazz music or just New Orleans music, I made her several series of mixed CDs and Tootie Ma and Louisiana Fairy Tale were absolutely on those CDs. So great songs, both of them. And they keep it going with track five after You've gone with bluegrass legend Dell McQuery. And I didn't know that it was him. I wrote down on my first pass, I thought it was Hank Williams III.


Participant #1:

At the same time that this album came out, another album came out called American Legacies and it was the Preservation Hall Jazz Band not featuring and the Del McCorry Band. And that was what I saw at Bonneroo, was those guys on stage together. Didn't really realize it at the time because there was just a lot going on. But that was what I saw and it was amazing. I mean, that album could have taken this one's place. So you got just two legendary groups from two legendary different backgrounds. You got bluegrass and you got tragic. And it meshes so well. Yeah. Del McCorry. I love it. Great song. It makes me want to check more out from him, honestly. That's how much I like that vocal. I got into bluegrass because of Del McCorry and this album. So this is one of those things where you just start unraveling the thread. That's where I discovered then the Stanley Brothers and then like, Ralph Stanley, who's prominent on the O' Brother Where Art Thou soundtrack, stuff like that. From there, I've discovered Old Crow Medicine Show and others just in this great plethora of bluegrass bands that, like I said, they're listening to them for hours, too. Sure. What about track six, freight train? That's a classic title. Freight train is a good track. Annie DeFranco not one of my personal highlights, but it does fit very well on the out.


Participant #1:

It definitely doesn't sound like that Annie DeFranco that most people would probably


Participant #1:

unless she's doing this stuff. Got you, boys. I guess. Did she move in this direction later in her career or I don't know. Or just like a one off from her? I don't know either. I did like the dueling clarinet and trumpet lines in this song that was a highlight for me, rather than maybe your voice. Yeah. It doesn't really stand out as one of my favorites, but it fits on the album quite well. Yes. And of course, the next one, Blue Skies, makes me just want to sing along. But they do it in a different way than most people, probably. Yeah. This is unlike any other Blue Skies that you're used to hearing. And


Participant #1:

with blue skies I'm thinking I don't know. Let's say back to Frank Sinatra. Some sort of Kruner version. Johnny Mercer. I don't know who actually, nelson. Did Willie Nelson do a blue Skies? He might have. Willie Nelson's covered everything. I mean, that's a standard, right? Yes.


Participant #1:

I like the arrangement of this one because this one has a lot of side voices and people singing at different parts, not in sync with the others, as if it's a crowd singing with them and you could tell they're having fun.


Participant #1:

Yeah. It sounded like in the studio, they were all having a good time playing this standard song that they maybe had song hundred times, thousand times in their careers, but they still had a lot of fun with it. Yeah, I think you have some banjo in there and there's a lot going on in that particular tune. It's probably one of the more rowdy songs on the album at points. Right. Track eight features a familiar name for a lot of people. So track eight, I would say, and this is my episode, so I'm going to say this is the second best song on the album. Okay. All right. And at the time, I had no idea who Jason Isbell was.


Participant #1:

Yeah, he actually blew up, I think, not long after this album came out because this came out in 2010, nobody knows you featuring Jason Isbell. And how to describe this one you've got I like the piano intro. The piano is wonderful. My favorite part outside of J SBA, though, is the trumpet. You got Leroy Jones playing trumpet. Here another legend


Participant #1:

who I got to see at Preservation Hall. He's an old friend of Perry Conic Jr. As well. But after the show, I made a beeline for upfront just to shake his hand. That was wonderful, man. Thank you. Leroy Jones recently released his own documentary called A Man in his trumpet. So it's really good. I recommend checking that out. He was one of my during season one. I shoot you a shot. I send him a message in his team and say, you want to be on my podcast? But I got no answer. They're busy, they're on tour. They'll get back to you. I love hearing his stuff. Again, that's another one. Along with Lucia, Barbara and YouTube. Leroy Jones is amazing. And then you have Old Rugged Cross. That's like gospel standard, right? It is. And this is one that kind of grows on you.


Participant #1:

It seems kind of one of the low on ones at first, but it definitely, to me, ranks higher over time. I like Brandy Carlyle's voice on it. She's got this soulful and scratchy version of it that really say with the soulful trombone of Lucian Bobber. And again, it fits. I wrote down in my notes, I recognized this voice, but I can't picture who is seeing


Participant #1:

it. Definitely had like a gospel thing feel going on. Definitely. I like that stuff. The gospel stuff, too. What did you think of track ten, Trouble in Mind? I want to hear your notes first. I didn't write a whole lot down about that, but I recognized it as Richie Havens. Yeah. And I thought, wow, that's a really interesting pairing, richie Havens.


Participant #1:

Richie Havens being the opening act at Woodstock. Right. And that's really all I knew him as. I just knew the name. And I couldn't name you any of his songs, unfortunately. But he died in 2013, so not long after this album came out. It's definitely the slowest song on the album, but I like it. It's just a nice soulful song. Very intimate, sad. Yeah. And you need your ABS and flows in the album. And this might be, like you said, a little bit of a downflow, but it still has a place in this album. One tragedy that I can't find anywhere is I say tragedy. It's a tragedy because there's no recording video of this album being made. If there is, no one has it hasn't come onto the Internet. There's some pictures. So you got pictures of Richie Havens and his guitar and stuff. But if there was ever anything to make a documentary of the making of, this would have been it. I'd put that damn thing on repeat if they had that. That would be really cool to see. That is unfortunate that nothing exists. All these famous musicians. Oh, man. That would have been yeah. Track eleven features a young up and comer. I would have never guessed it was him.


Participant #1:

Are all dark down new Orleans land of dreams you'll never know how nice it seems yeah. Merle Haggard singing one of my favorite New Orleans standards, basin Street Blues. I didn't know it until I had to go back to see. I did not recognize his voice. It did not sound like him. There's no mama tried in. That song at all. There's no country in that voice to me at all. Yeah. So before this album, I had a piano only version of Basin Street Blues that was regularly in my playlist from Harry Kyle Jr. And then I had Preservation Hall Jazz Band doing Basin Street Blues from the 60s or 70s with Sweet Emma singing from piano. So two completely different versions. And then this one was very different. But I love it. It's more of got a little bit of a country version to it and I like the arrangement, I like the interpretation. This song is probably what, it's probably been around since 40s, maybe earlier 30s. Yeah. I think that Basin Street was the that's where Storyville was in New Orleans before the record was the thing. Back when in order for there to be jazz, jazz had to be played in Storeyville, which was like where the brothels were and stuff. It was way back in the day. So that's where Basin Street has its origins. And if I completely butchered that to any New Orleans historians out there, I apologize. But that was I thought it was my neck that was my question. So I was wondering, was it controversial song at the time? Because they talk about where the dark and light folk meet. That's just what it was. Storyville was where Lewis Armstrong played when he was a kid, where he learned the trumpet there from Buddy Bolden Jelly, Well Morton, that's where they played. And the white people of New Orleans and the creole people of New Orleans and the black people, they would all when it came to jazz and dancing, everybody am I glossing over a lot there? I'm not going to say everybody got along and everyone was all happy. That's the wrong thing to say. But when it came to enjoying the music, there was a certain level of happiness and cohesion when it came to what was good music, obviously tons of people that did not agree with that, and there was plenty of that, of course. But when it comes to good music, the lyrics speak volume. Yeah, most of these songs have your traditional Relatable themes, right? I mean, love, money, the weather, they're all mentioned in most of these songs, right? Yes. Love and loss and money and the weather. I mean, these are traditional themes that appeal to anyone and everyone. Yeah. So you got ones that are about family, the ones that are about faith. The basic themes of good old fashioned blues tunes played through jazz, I think those are Relatable themes and that's what makes this music so popular. I agree. So what are we on truck twelve? There is a light featuring the Blind Boys of Alabama. Boys are the part of the band. The featured singers is Clint Madigan, who is the main saxophone player of the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Oh, okay. But didn't realize that. Yeah, he's got a phenomenal voice love his voice. And whenever the Preservation Hall Band releases a single of sorts they've had several singles released over the years, in the past ten years or so with, like, I Can't Give You Anything But Love and others, that Clint is the featured vocalist. He's got that booming voice that can do so many different ranges. In fact, if your YouTube tutor is a big, fine thing, you don't get Tom Waitsting and you get Clint. Okay. Great version. One of the first things you'll see on YouTube. Great saxophone player, great vocalist. And the band does a fantastic job. Let's not forget the gospel organ sound. And that was amazing. Yeah, that nice intro. And then it picks up like you're listening in a church. Yes,


Participant #1:

exactly. It makes you think of the James Brown and the Blues Brothers there you go. Which was a very influential film for me. Got me into a lot of different music. Right. Same here. Same here. So. Track 13 wine and Boy Bleers, featuring the late, great Doctor John yeah, always awesome. I'm a wine and boy don't deny my name


Participant #1:

love, Dr. John. He's got some amazing New Orleans specific albums out there that go under the radar, but he's great. I like that super low tupa sound. It sounds almost like a farting jock or something. It's such a really low and it's just got that I like the trumpet technique they use with the cut mute on the end of it. Yes. Mark Broad's playing trumpet on this one. And that plus and I had a note here on the low tuba. Those two together, they have this, like you say, the flow of the album, the end flow of this particular song where you'll have Dr. Johnson I'm a Wine and Boy. And then the trumpet and the tuba, they bring it down. Yeah. It's really cool. Yes. It was a great contrast. I think it would work. That's the word I'm looking for. The next track is interesting Rocking Chair. Yeah. This is so really neat.

Participant #1:

Yeah. Explain this to me. I have no research on this. There's really nothing out there describing the making. Louis Armstrong was already deceased. He was. And I don't know


Participant #1:

obviously, they took the vocals of Mr. Armstrong and put it to the band and it works perfectly. I wish I had some sort of, I don't know, a single paragraph describing how they made this song, but none exists. You look on the album and the liner notes, it just says, Louis Armstrong. This is lead singer. Okay. But it's great from the group. Yeah. In fact, at first I had Lois Armstrong is it a sound like I didn't know. I don't know if he did this in the past. Album of his own. Yeah. I don't know if it was a lost track. They must have listed a vocal. And then the jazz band put their own track behind it. That's the most logical they do that now. They do that now on songs. So I'm assuming this was maybe one of the early versions or early attempts at that, maybe. So for a while there, my job had this thing, the inter office radio, where you could be a guest DJ for an hour and play your own set list. Cool. It was fun. It was really fun. I did that on a local PR radio station. I got to be on there and did you have to pay the royalties or did they have already the songs there? Yeah. How does that work? That's probably another story because you know what, I go in there with my five and they're like, well, can we change this one? No, you can't change it because this is my flat. Anyway, sorry, my particular music. Come on. I got my five. This is my five. No, I will not compromise. I might have compromised a little. I went in there with an hour of my music and the Settlers was called A Stroll Through the Quarter, and it was an hour of New Orleans music. They had to screen it ahead of time because they want to make sure there's nothing offensive that's going to oh, yeah, right. And anyone in the office, that sort of thing, because everybody can whoever gets slotted can do an hour of whatever, gas, metal, whatever they want. They looked at my set list, they're like, oh, you're good. This isn't going to offend anybody right off the bat. My first song is later on the south. Max My second song was rock and chair with Louis Armstrong. And the feedback I got was people that were fans had never heard that song before. Fans of his like deep people. Yeah. So that was kind of neat, people reaching it out. After all. Those playlists are available on Spotify if anybody is interested. I got to do two of them, so that was pretty cool. Until they killed the internal radio station. We won't go there. I'm sure somebody ruined it for everyone, right? Oh, yeah. Corporate america. We got bought.


Participant #1:

Okay. I didn't go in the direction I thought, okay, that just kind of went to the wayside once corporate got involved. So, track 15. Baby Won't shoot. So this is another one of my favorites, actually. I really enjoy Amy Lever's Voice On baby, won't you please come home?


Participant #1:

I don't know why I can't really describe it, but I just really like it. And I follow her on social media stuff. She's got a lot of stuff. It's one that she's not very well known, she's not like tour or whatever, but I think she's local to New Orleans, so don't quote me on that. But very cool. She's just got a very sweet voice. And it's a different take on this song because I've heard other versions of this song that were more jazzy and this one was I don't say poppy, but it was just maybe a little smoother jazz. Yeah. What about the next track? One of my favorite guys, Steve Earl pay nobody's business. I know. I like Steve Earl. Did you recognize him when he started singing? Yeah, I like his stuff. I'm a fan. Definitely a fan. So this album came out right when the HBO series Treme was playing. Yes, I watched that. Yeah. And so Steve Earl had a prominent role in that particular series as a musician and had a couple of songs on that soundtrack as well, which I'd recommend the tremendous soundtrack to anyone out there, all the different seasons of it. Yeah, just a good uppiet tune. Speaking of soundtrack, do you know that this album we're talking about, there's a double vinyl version of Discogs? $125. Really? I have that $125. Do you have the double vinyl? Yeah, that's what I bought back in. I didn't really I looked it up. I was thinking about getting it and I thought, nope, not at 125. But I was doing on whatever service. Yeah. Because I wanted those extra songs. Okay, nice. They got a couple extra songs on that second disk that are crucial crucial to your listening ears. Yes. Track 17. Some cold, rainy day feature. Cory chisel. Not a name I recognize, but this is another one where it made me want to explore the singer more. And I don't think he's exploded like Jason isbell. Has. But he does have some really cool stuff out there. He's got a very unique voice.


Participant #1:

This is a good song, one of my favorite song here because it makes you feel like you're just kind of sitting inside and you're blue, you're sad on this cold rainy day. He really makes you feel it. You can relate to him. Exactly. Yeah. Track 18 is I ain't got nobody. A good old classic. No. Makes me think of David Leroth. Unfortunately,


Participant #1:

I don't have many notes on this particular version. It's just a good version of an old standard, buddy Muller and name? I don't know. I'll let you pronounce the next track, but I do remember I had a really lovely jump of solo on it. So track 19 is La Vie En Rose.


Participant #1:

This is a very famous song, obviously. Dates back France, I'm pretty sure, but this returning century song, probably. And this one is all in French, so she sings it all in French, featuring Angelique Kijo and Terrace Blanchard, who plays the trumpet.


Participant #1:

The cool thing about this one, this is one that I put on that CD for Michelle, and she loved the song, and she sought out other versions, and we ended up picking the Lewis Armstrong version as our first dance at our wedding. Nice. Okay. Yeah. This is a very famous song. There's a lot of great versions out there. And then the next song did they put the two that nobody can pronounce on purpose or what?


Participant #1:

Yeah, this is a really good vocal to form. It's really good. I liked it. She seems very good. Passion. She does, yeah. Very smooth and silky and kind of sexy. It was pretty cool. Yeah. I could easily say this is a sexy song. It's anita Breen is the singer and I don't know much about her at all, but it's a good song.


Participant #1:

Yeah. I wonder if a lot of these, besides the big names, like you were saying earlier, I wonder if they're local. Not legends, but locally known upper echelon. It's a very tight community of musicians down there. They all know each other, they all play together. I've been in bars down there where there's a great band playing on the stage. Someone walks in, has a case of something of an instrument, they're like in the middle of a song. Hey. Pointing across the room. Come on. And then they'll walk up on stage and then they'll just join in like they were there the whole time. I mean, it's fantastic. That's awesome. Yeah. That is awesome. Track 21, another classic, classic song, right? St James Infirmary. St James Infirmary. This is the best song on the album.


Participant #1:

It's got a very cold trumpet and banjo from Stacy Vaughn on these are the extra tracks. Not on the original version. That's right. So Jim James from My Morning Jacket returns and he gives a great vocal performance. But, man, the band is just firing on all cylinders on this one.


Participant #1:

I can't say enough good things about this version of St James Infirmary. It's one of my favorites. Preservation Hall Jazz Band has been doing this song for a long time. There's probably a dozen different versions out there, if you search. Oh, yeah. They do an upbeat version called The King James Remix with Clint Madigan again on lead vocals. And that's a really fun version. I would recommend that one. But I love this one because it is so slow and drawn out. They get so much out of one note at different points, they just drag that note out. Because the song is about a guy who finds his woman dead and it's you feel consumption, right? Yeah. Consumption in there. It depends on the version. You hear some versions, she was out horrine and got shot. It all depends on the version of the song because the lyrics always change. That's another great thing about this song. And these lyrics are dark. Yeah. The guy was walking down the street and the coroner calls him in and the woman lying on the slab is this girl and she was lying there dead. Yeah. The lyrics are dark, very dark. And I think he sings it through the megaphone again. Oh, right. To get that haunting sound to it. Yeah. Now, you say that, I think it's probably right. And then you go into track 22, which is kind of another I'm not going to say towner, but the lyrics are died on the battlefield. Right. Just like with Tootie Ma, This is another one that goes back to the Mardi Gras Indians.


Participant #1:

There's a lot of different versions of it out there. But Tom Waits again, comes in swinging with that voice. And I was used to the banjo version by the Baby Dodds Trio from the it's so different. Just think of a jolty little banjo. And then this is a call to action song. So the lead singer says, Corinne died on the battlefield and the backup Corin died on the battlefield. But the way Tom Waste sings it with that scratchy bass voice and then you have the backup band. The band. It's such a different version. I love it. Great version. I wish there was some sort of video of them playing this. I really do. You search the entire interweb and there's no Tom Waits. Not even with maybe like, the Dirty Dozen brass band or anything. Not that I could find yet. Anybody has it out there, please send it on to yes, send a link. So the next song is Careless Love with Dom McCormick. Again, another great take on another New Orleans classic.


Participant #1:

And this is one of fun because he has that very kind of happy, upbeat bluegrass voice. But it's got such dark lyrics. Yes, I love that. The Barns desk is kind of dark. Yeah. Now that you think about it, that just came to me, literally. I didn't even have that written down. I'm just thinking because the next track is Sailing Up, Sailing Down, this one's weird. I don't skip anything on the album, but the final two tracks, they're there, but I don't necessarily go to them.


Participant #1:

I thought it was Susan Teddeski's voice, but it's not. I was hopeful that it was because I love her listening to her voice. But the last two tracks say sailing up, sailing down and We Shall Overcome are both with Pete Seeger and Tao Rodriguez. Pete Seegar, obviously, that's old folks singer guy from way back. But I don't know the other I don't either. I don't know the name or what that person has done. But we shall overcome. Of course, that's closing out. Yeah. That's a group thing, kind of thing.


Participant #1:

The BOP Dillon. When they close out, I shall be released. Yeah. There you go. You got it. It's in that same vein, right? It's the perfect song to close out the album.


Participant #1:

There's no real duds, then, for you. I mean, there was a few that you were maybe, but overall, yeah, I don't skip anything. I really do like to put this one on shuffle. The songs that I take away and put on my other playlists you can say st. James Infirmary. Tuti Ma, louisiana fairy Tale down and out basin Street Blues There are several that I do pull out and like to listen to by themselves. It's really just my go to happy place to put this album on shuffle. Sounds like this album is maybe like a family listening album. It's definitely one that my wife can tolerate, I'll say. Right, so you put it on the car on a road trip. She won't turn this one off. She might turn off animals. So rather than start that argument, we'll put on New Orleans stuff. But this one definitely just reminds me of our courtship, our trips to New Orleans as a dating couple, engaged and then married, all in New Orleans. And several of these songs were played at our wedding. We went full tourist destination, wedding dance down the street with a band in front of us. That was great. Nice. Yeah. So not only is it great music, but it also holds all those special memories as well. So it's like a double bonus album for you. It does. It does. And this episode will probably come out right around our anniversary in September. So that works out, too. Yeah. There you go. Bonus. Bonus. Is there anything else you want to talk about with this album? Pretty much. I think we pretty much covered it. Preservation hall. If you're ever in New Orleans, it is worth it to just go get in line and listen to those guys play. They're amazing. You sold me on it. If it's anything like this album down there, I've never been to New Orleans and I would love to go sometime. And that's a good point. This album really feels like you're there. Some of their other albums are either they are very old or they're trying to do different styles. Like they've done some Cuban style jazz lately and other things. This one feels like you're sitting at the hall watching these guys play. That's one of the reasons I love it. Yeah, it does make you feel like I feel like they probably recorded this almost live. Oh, yeah. And maybe they might have threw some of the singers on later, maybe. But it does have a very lively I would assume they put Louis Armstrong on later.


Participant #1:

Definitely that one. The Preservation Hall is where the Foo Fighters recorded Sonic Highways. Oh, I didn't know that. Yeah. So the Preservation Hall Jazz Band is in the background. They're the backing band for the Foo Fighters on that particular song. And I'm sorry, the song name escapes me at the moment, but after they recorded it, they actually opened up all the windows of Preservation Hall and gave an impromptu mini concert to everybody on this little tiny street. Trombone Shorty was there. He's on the song, too. And they did this a week and a half after we were there.


Participant #1:

That would have been was that on the Sonic Highways documentary? Yes, it was. Okay. I don't know. The full mini concert, I don't think, was on there, but the recording inside the hall absolutely was. Okay. It's the no, I can watch that because I watched most of that and I don't remember. So I'm going to have to go back and watch that. Yeah. The Chicago episode and the New Orleans episode are my favorites of that particular documentary, obviously. Cool documentary. I like that. I like hearing David Roll talk about how just being in New Orleans inspired, fired him for that song. And it's a good song. It's not their best song, but it's definitely really a good song. And you can hear the little reasons in his lyrics. The little parts of New Orleans, you can hear it. Right. Okay, so we've pretty much covered everything on this album, what albums major shortlist but didn't make the top spot. So for a shortlist, I focus more on a jazz shortlist this particular time. And the previously mentioned American Legacies, which is the Preservation Hall band with the Del McCorrey Band. Everyone should check that out. Harry Kona Jr. Has two very specific New Orleans jazz albums in his own way. One's called Omanola and the other one is called Chezandevu Carey. Okay. Vukerry is French quarter in French. I don't know what Chenzan dew means. Maybe it's dance the French Quarter or something. Listeners, please respond with your answers. Well, Chancellori is actually all instrumental, so it's just an instrumental album. And then Omy Nola is a lot of standards. You've got Careless Love, you've got the Chicago Araby and just all kinds of good New Orleans classics done with Harry Connock and his big band. That's really cool. George Lewis Band of New Orleans. The album Jazz and Preservation Hall Four. George Lewis was one of the first clarinet players there. So this is one of those old sounding albums and it's really good. Baby Dodds Trio. The album Jazz Ala Creole they're the ones that do the original corin died on the battlefield. Okay. Jelly Roll Morton the discovery of jazz. That's just an amazing one. You can just put on in the background of anywhere and then really any of the individual albums from the Preservation all Jazz Band, old and new. You got the Hurricane sessions that's it was a really good one. It's literally called that's. It with exclamation points. Best of the early years. Songs of normals. They've got like a million. And they've actually got a box set, which I got for Chris was a couple of years ago, which has like 75 tracks on it. Oh, wow. That was really good. Yeah, I was like five disks. Epic. Yeah. So if you're listening and you maybe want something a little bit different and you never explored this type of music, this might be a good album to start with. It is. And then starter one branch off from here. Absolutely. This one, whichever direction you choose to go. Yeah. I mean, if you know the bluegrass people, if you know the classic rock people, you got Dr. John, you've got Steve, you got some country guys in there. Del McCorrey. Like I said, I'm going to explore some of that. You can jump off in a lot of directions. Here my morning jacket. So you got the jambands in there? Yeah. Tom Waits for the Tom Waits fans. I'm not sure what kind of music Tom Waits is specifically. Dark, moody, crooner fans. I don't know either. So before we wrap this up, you want to tell listeners out there what you're working on or if they can find you anywhere or anything you would like to pitch. I just got into something. Well, today, I think I'm going to use this pitch time to thank all the listeners and guests from the full two seasons of music rewind I posted the other day on The Socials how rewarding it's been, and that is a complete understatement. I have learned so much about everything from podcasting to interviewing to different types of music. And it's been amazing to hear all of the stories behind these albums, both uplifting stories, personal stories, everything. And then the music that's also taken me out of my comfort zone. There's been so many. And then you've got the feedback that comes to me. I've got a lot of great feedback about how either people are enjoying the conversations again, those stories, regardless of their opinion of the music. Like, I've had people say, I don't really like that Kiss album, but that episode was great. I loved the stories, or Paul McCartney ruined the Beatles, but I liked the episode, literally. I did get that,


Participant #1:

and I enjoyed that. That was kind of the whole point of the show, was to just let people tell the stories, because for the most part, we are all not musicians of great renown. We're not blue checks of named people. And to be able to tell your story to hundreds of listeners, which is quite nice. I'm giving everybody a platform and myself, and I'm enjoying it. It's a lot of fun. You don't have to like the music exactly, to enjoy the stories and the passion that people bring to each podcast. And I've also got a lot of feedback about how people may know one or two tracks, but they never gave the album anytime. Yes, but realizing that there's so many other great tracks on those albums that they just missed. Good point. Like you said, animals just kind of fell off your radar. I've gotten a lot of feedback of that nature, so it's really cool. Season three is outlined. I've got a lot of great guests lined up, albums in the queue, and I am interested to get at it. But I'm going to take some time off to do some non podcast stuff, clear my head, relax, listen to all those Red Hot Chili Peppers links that Luke keeps sending us that I haven't had time to watch them all yet. Keep them coming, Luke. But I just haven't gotten to them all yet. Recording will resume this fall and winter. New episodes will be out in 2023. And keep a look out for the winter announcements for the 2022 People's Choice Podcast Awards because we were nominated in the best music podcast category, which is pretty awesome. Thank you to anyone who nominated us. Yeah, that's quite an honor. That's really cool, too. Really cool to have such a small outfit to get that. Well, just to be nominated, I mean yeah, it's a huge deal. That's cool. It's amazing. Everyone needs to buy some Gotham cigars and go and listen to the rest of season one and season two, if you haven't yet. Yeah. There you go. All right, Steve. All right. Thank you for your time today. Pleasure, as always. And talk about the Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Thanks for doing this, Allen. I appreciate it. Always fun. Hopefully, in season three, you can finally narrow in an album you want to do. It's so hard to narrow it down. All right, well, thank you again for listening to Music Rewind, a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. And as I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time.


Participant #1:

A podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. Back to you. Anchors.



https://musicrewind.podbean.com/e/preservation-hall-jazz-band-with-guest-stephen-epley/


1 view0 comments
bottom of page