top of page

Live Rust Transcript

Updated: Jun 28, 2022

Music Rewind welcomes UK Singer/Songwriter Julience to discuss Live Rust by Neil Young & Crazy Horse


Album: Live Rust

Artist: Neil Young & Crazy Horse

Year: 1979


Our Guest, Julience, multi-instrument singer-songwriter based out of the UK. He has recently released 3 singles. Listen to them here. The Flood

@Julienceuk on Instagram


Transcript as follows:

Participant #1:

Hello and welcome to season two of Music Rewind, a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host, Steve Epley, and in each episode I will invite a guest on them to tell us about their favorite music album, how they discovered it and what makes it special to them.


Joining me today is a multi talented musician out of the UK, Julience. Julience is a multi instrumental singer songwriter whose new single Alcohol is out there on all the streaming platforms. Originally from the Netherlands, he relocated to Manchester to pursue his music career and we are lucky to have him with us today. Welcome, Julian, and thank you for being on the show. Oh, Steve, no problem. It's a pleasure. Absolute pleasure. Yeah. I'm glad you reached out on Instagram and wanted to be a part of this. This is great. Yeah, it's pleasure is all mine, Steve. Really nice to do something like this. I've never really done it before, so, yeah, let's get cracking. That's what I'll say. All right, let's jump right into this. What album did you bring to the table and why is it so special to you? Right, the album I brought to the table today is a live album from 1079, but Neil Young Crazy Horse called Live Rust.


Participant #1:

I've always been tossed in about one of my favorite, one of my favorite bands, music artists, and it's always been well, at what point it was the Beatles and then there was always but I think Neil Young has always been pretty much closed second all the way through. And I think there's a lot of Neil Young I've listened to lately, last couple of years that I've really never listened to before. And it's just, for me, gone to the conclusion that Neil Young for me, has got to be the greatest songwriter, the greatest guitar player, the old musician, the package, everything and life for us. I think that is basically where Neil Young was just at the pinnacle of his career. The bank wasn't fire crazy or, I think, the greatest backing man of all time. It just completely fitted so perfectly to his style of music and everything. It's just awesome. Yeah, I agree. And this was a real fun album to listen to. Several songs that I had not heard before. Yeah. But obviously many songs that are classic kids from Neil Young. I had the privilege of kind of ripping the Neil Young collection from my brother. He got it for Christmas one year and it was like ACDs and I just ripped them all. They had all kinds of Buffalo Springfield and Crosby still is a Nash Young on there and a lot of old stuff. So that's where I really learned Neil Young was out of that box set because before that I had just heard a couple of hits and knew I liked them but never dove in. And this album was really cool to listen to because it was like a musical journey of his career up to that point. Yeah, how it starts out with his early full acoustic stuff and then ends with his full on punk early grunge era. Oh, yeah. Well, you say, you know, there's a lot of New Young stuff that you haven't heard before, but at the time when he did the Rust Never Sleeps tour on the same tour record another album called Rust Never Sleeps, which was kind of recorded live and it overdubbed in the studio, it took all the audience out and it kind of got releases, a studio album during a tour where many people I went to see Neil Young and loads of them, songs they had never heard before. Think of songs like Powder Finger, their Sedan Delivery, Hey My, the Big Two. So for people who went to see Neil Young at that time, they had never heard themselves before. For them, the introduction to that new music as well. Especially, like you said, the punk rock style. Because at the time, I think the 70s for Neil Young as for many musicians, was probably a really hectic time because obviously early 70s, Neil Young released, you know, Harvest, which was probably the most the best known Neil Young album Risk with a couple of the most best known sons like Old Man, Heart of Gold, stuff like that. It's sitting right over there. Actually, I was just listening to that album the other day. Yeah, at the time what he did was he went on tour but he didn't play any of the Harvest stuff, he just played completely new electric sets. So the same thing people never heard of before, some people didn't like it, some people thought it was great and they released an album called The Time Fades Away, which is a really not very well known New Young album. Never got released from CD, as far as I know. So it's the kind of same situation in the late 70s when he went on the Rosen of his sleep, like I said, especially the 70s with New Young. A lot of his like Danny Witten, his main guitar player and Crazier Recipe at the start he died of heroin overdose, new Young went to a bit of a depression and they released a couple of albums like Tonight's Night On The Beach that are really downy feel to it. Very different than any more upbeat Harvest, so to say. So then, late 70s, with the advent of punk music, the idea of the whole tour was kind of a sort of a concept tour. That's what it's called rust Never Sleeps, the idea that music constantly evolves. Right. I think Neil Young, as for many people, had the idea that loads of all the music from all musicians that bands of stuff like The Beatles had quit ten years ago. Zeppelin pretty much came to an end that time. The who as well. So a lot of old musicians, old fans that were well known at the time, they kind of fell out and punk rock and new wave and all that stuff came in. So the idea of the tour was kind of for New Young to stay relevant. That was kind of what they tried to do, stay relevant. And that's the concept of the tour. That's why if you look at any of the old footage from that tour, you see all these kind of weird, crazy people walking around in hooded shirts and what. If you say it was a concept, sure. The goal was a studio album, a live album and a movie, I believe, that he co directed. Yeah, true. Yeah. Bernard Shaky, I think he called himself as director. Yeah, something like that. Yeah. The pseudonym in there. But like I said, I think at the time, it was kind of as if Neil Young, which is an unstoppable force, kind of run into a movable object, which is Crazy Horse. And it just completely especially that time, it just completely came out with a bang. And that's just the absolute pinnacle of his career at that time. I agree. And he plays very well with Crazy Horse. I don't know how you discover Neil Young if you were a fan of his folk stuff first and then the rock stuff later, the punk grunge stuff, or vice versa. But it's neat to kind of look at him as the solo artist and the singing in harmony with Buffalo Springfield and Crosby still is a Nash. And then also leading ten to 20 minutes jams with Crazy Horse. And he can do both of them excellently. Not many musicians can do that. That's extreme level of talent there. Exactly. So how did you discover Neil Young? Was it the folk stuff first or the rock stuff first? Well, I think probably a bit of both, really. Obviously, like I said, Harvey is just one of the albums that always got played at home. Because we lived in Hollandwood. My grandparents both lived about an hour and a half away. So every two or three weeks we'd always drive there. My parents did. And sometimes I would pick an album or my sister would and my parents would, but no one was always on. The Martis are just the greatest hits album or the lifelong album. They always found them away into the car pretty regularly. So that's kind of how we got into it. Okay. Yeah. If it was this album that helped you discover New young. That right there you get a compressed best of career. Yeah, that's pretty cool. I think over the course of my life, I'm 28 years old now, nearly 29, actually, next month. But it's by far the album I've listened to the most, because I just remember loads of Fridays after work when I come home and I go out for a few bevy pub, and what do I do? Let's put in some music. Let's put on a live rust, just listen to the whole album start to finish. I've done that and that album so much more than any other album in my life. And that was going to be my next question, is how do you listen to it? Is it straight through, or do you have select tracks that you like to jump to? Well, if I have time and I have something, I have time. I do listen to it in its entirety probably once a month or so. But sometimes if I'm just at home before I have to go to work again with listening to music, there's a couple of songs later on, especially the electric songs I normally than the jump to. Okay, so, well, walk me through the album. I mean, what are some standouts? Or we can go track by track. It's your album. Yeah. Okay. Well, we can pretty much go through all album, really. Well, it starts with a song called Sugar Mountain, which was, I think it was a B side to one of the really early songs that he had


Participant #1:

maybe from the after the Gold Rush era. It was actually written when he was with the Squires. Right? Really? Yeah. It goes back that far. All right. Yeah. So it's really all too yeah. Well, one of his first, probably cleanly written songs as far as released and recorded. That's fair to say. Yeah. Now, that's a start of the acoustic set at the beginning. Then you have a couple of songs that come through review, like Comes a Time I am a Child. I think I'm a child with some other B side. Really early Bside. Around the same time, probably. Yeah. That's a Buffalo Springfield tune. Yeah. Okay. I don't know where it Comes to Time comes from, but I know that I have a child with Buffalo Springfield. Right. Well, I think Comes the Time came from the album that got released before


Participant #1:

I think it was even before Russian Ever Sleeps, before the tour. It was just before American Stars and Bias was the album. Comes a Time that the sun was on. Then you get, obviously, one of the better sons in the album, I think better Sons would be the role. Great. You get the piano version of the version that he plays in the piano after the Gold Rush.


Participant #1:

It's just a beautiful song in anxiety from the album version, the live version. It is, I agree. And it just screams with that folk style of just telling a random story exactly about spaceships in the base. It doesn't make much sense, but it's fun to listen to. And like I said, it's a beautiful piano song. Piano Version he Plays A Piano and then the harmonica as well at the same time. It's just great. He Plays A Harmonica throughout the Holocaust, except but then when you hear it together with the piano, because on the original studio recording, it's doing for horn, I think it's a horn solo. Oh, really? Yeah. Saliva plays it with the ammonic and it's awesome. Next song you get the My My Hey Hey it's called, which is the people Know Hey, Hey, my Electric Song. But he actually did two versions of the acoustic version that he played early on in the set and then obviously later on they come back with the electric version. But that's obviously, like I said, that is one of the songs that nobody had ever heard before, before he came to New York's concert.


Participant #1:

That would have been great here in this live for the first time without ever hearing it on the radio. That would have been a hell of an experience. Yeah. We've got the controversial lyrics of Better To Burn Out Than To Fade Away. Kurt Cobain put that in a suicide note sort of thing.


Participant #1:

That's why they call him the Godfather of Grunge. He played with Paul Gem in the obviously curt cabinet referenced to it, so he had a massive influence on the Seattle stand in the love. The way this one ends, where the last line, rock and roll will never die is the music stops, it's just acapella. That one last line. And he's allowed to just kind of let that last word trail and then the crowd cheers. It ends very well. Yeah. Well, on the film version, what happens is he actually puts his guitar and I guess it do a sleeping bag and then the road icy column, they wear like purple hoots or whatever it is, like aliens over this. They take him off the stage in a sleeping bag while he says, Rock and roll will never die. And then they set up the stage with the electrics and then obviously the electric sets that. It's really funny, but yeah, it's a bit funny, but I got to watch this video, Dan. Yeah, that sounds wild. It's crazy. But obviously another thing about this song is, like, with the advent of punk, like I said, you kind of tried to stay relevant and it's a tribute to Johnny Ron from the Sex Pistols. How awesome is that? And Elvis. So the king is dead. Just talk about Elvis. And then this is the story of Johnny Rotten. He's trying to beat that bridge the gap. Oh, yeah. It's special. It's amazing. And then that's where the album for me just goes into overdrives. You get the electric stuff, you get two songs, really, when you dance. I could really love which is off there after The Gold Rush.


Participant #1:

That's one I hadn't heard before. It's a song, early release and then you get the loaner, which comes straight after it. The loaner has always been one of my favorite Young tunes, but I had never heard this version. I'm used to the acoustic, slowed down version yeah. Of his first studio album. Yeah, the first solo album. This was nice change. It was a nice pumping up a little bit version.


Participant #1:

Tikita. This is awesome, the guitar sound of it. It's really erratic guitar playing. I don't know, you can have these musicians that can play a million notes per second per minute. But you don't have to be like that. I mean, Neil Young is delivering embodiment that you don't necessarily need to play a billion notes per minute. That's true. Great guitar player. Yeah. That's the start of the electric set and then it goes back to a bit of acoustic and then you get the Needle And The Damage Done, which is obviously a really famous son of harvest about obviously the heroin addiction that was right at the time with people like Danny Wynn, the Rhodey, Bruce Berry. That his things off on Tonight tonight. It's heartbreaking, but yes, it's a heartbreaking origin of the song. But it is a wonderful song. It's a classic for a reason.


Participant #1:

It's so heartfelt. Every time you're, Young play the song, whether it's on the album version, which is also recorded live, by the way, or on the live bus version, or even when you look at him on Glastonbury in 2009, whatever it was, it's always emotional, really emotional for me to play that film. It's probably one of the most beautiful songs I've ever written, especially about the subject and called then you get after Neither Of The Damage Done, you get the song called A Lot Of Love. A Lot Of Love, which is, I think, also from the Come to Time album that I released about two years before. It's a nice little song, but it's not really one that stands out on the album, I think.


Participant #1:

Yeah, I agree. It was a nice song and it was new to me. Another one that I hadn't heard before. Yeah. But that's pretty much what you could say. It's just a nice song. Yeah, it's fine. Yeah, it's a nice filler on the lifestyle. Well, it takes everything. Well, it doesn't really take it down because Needle And Damage Done is obviously a slower tune, but it definitely from the flow of the album. It's a slow love song, which then a drastic change when you get to Sedan Delivery.


Participant #1:

Yeah.


Participant #1:

Is it about a car? Is it about a job? Slim delivery? I think it's a car, which shows my limited knowledge about cars. He thinks about beating a woman with varico's veins in the pool hall. 19 games. My No Ford is just this very punk. This song just screams of him trying to do a punk song and it kind of comes out of nowhere. The lyrics just didn't make any sense. I don't know. Yeah, they're kind of bonkers. What is the thing that he says at the end? Sedan delivery is a job I'm sure I'll keep and it was hard to find. Yeah, it's crazy. Well, like I said, it's a really funky song. That's really attitude to it. Yes. After Certain Delivery, which is on the LP, it was the opening to side three, which is not only my favorite new Young song, but probably my favorite song. Just in general, it's Powder Finger.


Participant #1:

This was a good song. I've always liked Powder Finger because it's again, that old folk storytelling, but you've got but it's a harder song. So he's mixing his two styles exactly. And it's so funny. You can always find whenever it's a video of him playing the song or anywhere, any discussions and albums, there's always people arguing about what the song is really about because people seem to interpret it in so many different ways. Even though I personally think personally, the lyrics is pretty straightforward. I mean, it's about a bunch of bootleggers or moonshiners that get caught by the police. Yeah, somebody doing something. There's really no definition of a war or prohibition or something, but they got caught or their enemy is caught up to them and it's like a gunboat or something and the elderly men are not around, so the young man has to take up arms and he dies. I mean, that lyric is just amazing. That is gone. My brother's around hunting in the mountains and Billy Billy John has been drinking since the river took Amyloozy it's like one of the murder ballots, really. Almost one of the murder ballots for the people, like the Deliverance kind of thing, that's always what comes in mind with the film Deliverance. I could see that. I completely can see that. Yeah, you always get that kind of feeling with it. My vision was more the same thing, but just more like Civil War America era. Oh, yeah, they found us and all we can do is fight. Yeah, but that's what I'm saying. The song has so many different interpretations that people give it. I mean, I've never heard Neil Young tell us completely what it's about. I mean, if I'd ever meet him, have the pleasure to meet him, asking


Participant #1:

so they got Powder Finger. After that, it goes straight into Cortesa Killer, which is from the album called Zuma In, I think.


Participant #1:

Fantastic song. Yeah, this live version is just absolutely amazing. There isn't a version of Cortes The Killer that I don't like. Every single one is different. 1 may be seven minutes, 1 may be 15 minutes. Oh, yeah, it's amazing. I love any band that can do that. Just turn any solo into a five minute jam session live. I just love that shit. And cortez the Killer is one of my favorite jam songs, because it's a wild tale of the whole Cortez explorer and Montezuma and all that. And then you get that last verse that's about the woman who misses him. What is this song about, exactly? Yeah, I mean, he said it himself. It's not a historian. There's him writing a song about Hen on Cortez. We'll throw a woman in there because there must be a woman somewhere and misses him. But then I think on the CD version anyway, the song has actually cut short a little bit because it wouldn't fit on the CD version otherwise. Oh, really? Yeah, but I think the album version is about 50 seconds and a minute longer. But to be honest, so that's the shorter version that's on the CD is the one I've always heard. That's the one I've always listened to on the side. There's two excellent covers of this song. One is Grace Potter with Joe Satriani. That's a version I love. But then also, there's another version with Dave Matthews and Warren Haynes at the Central Park. I knew you were going to say that one. They're great. Both versions are just fantastic. Yeah. When you said two covers, I know you're going to say that. It's crazy good. Well, I think the guitar soloing card is killed. I think this is the ultimate version of the song,


Participant #1:

but like I said, there's so many great versions of it. Next song on the list is Cinnamon Girl, which is from Everybody Notices Nowhere, the


Participant #1:

classic one. It is a classic song. Yeah. I mean, there's not much to say about that, really. It's just a classic tune. Many people will probably know that song if they hear it. Yeah. So that's in the middle of the album, it's being sandwiched between Caucus A Killer and Like A Hurricane. And Like A Hurricane. Again, I think this is just the ultimate version of The Sun.


Participant #1:

After the second version chorus, there's a guitar. So I was on for about, I think between a minute and a half to two minutes. But it just seems to go on forever. Yeah, it seems to never stop. Yeah. I mean, this one is nearly eight minutes in total and it's a great I've heard other versions and just like you said, for Cortez, this is, to me, the pinnacle one of like a Hurricane, that this is one to always go back to. Oh, yeah, I think so. It's one that on Dutch classic radio in Holland, there used to be a station called Arrow Classic Rock, and that was always a version of the song that they'd play. Oh, really? That's always a version of the play. They never played a studio version. It's always that one. Nice. It starts really as soon as the song starts. It starts with this, like, guitar feedback and whatever you hear, like, I had 2 seconds of it. You hear 2 seconds of that, gets our feedback and you know, that the dislike of heroic came from livelihood.


Participant #1:

It's just unmistakable. Yeah, that's one of those songs where you're right, you got this little bit of the white noise feedback at the beginning. You know exactly what's coming. The classic rock stations where I grew up, it was just all studio versions damn near all the time of all the classic rocks. So in my adulthood, when I discovered more of the live albums that were out there, they blew my mind. Each one over because it was like, Oh, this is so much better. Why weren't they playing this one on WLPO, Illinois Valley? Tiny classic rock stations. Yeah, but they should. Yeah. Like you say, it's the ultimate version of the song. The only live song they'd ever play was Do You Feel Like We Do from Peter Francis. All right. Yeah, I got to play that one every hour. Yeah, I'd imagine it's that one. And they're probably butt Mileage, No Woman, No Crying Life's on yours. Yeah, they should just probably write a letter and say, that's something you have to play instead. Well, then it's all about enjoyment. If you notice studio version, and then you stumble upon this one, which is all about right? Yeah, you're right. When you learn the studio albums, grow up with them, and then you do hear those live versions or the demo versions are always fun to hear. You're like, Oh, that's different, that's better. Oh, that's worse. That was a hard decision.


Participant #1:

Recently. I've watched the Beatles Get Back several times now. Right. And we talked about that a lot in my classic Rock Round Table. It was really neat to hear those say, you grow up with those very standard Beatles tracks, and then you hear the origins of them in different versions and you hear different lyrics, wrong lyrics. You just point in that you're almost there, John. You're almost there, Paul. You almost got it. If you look at Get Back, it's crazy to think that some songs at George Harrison wrote at the time didn't even make it to the album. Yeah. All things must pass. All Things Must pass. I recently bought that album because of Get Back, and then my cousin is a big fan of that album, and just that album keeps coming up in conversation, so I need to finally buy this list to it. It's a fantastic album. Oh, it definitely is. Yeah, it was a good buy a long time ago. Oh, classic. Yeah. After you get the last two songs, which are then you get the electric version of Hey, Hey, My My, which is Hey, Hey, My My this time, instead of My My hey. Into the black. Yeah, into the black.


Participant #1:

And that's where he gets that, really. There's a point where the guitar that he plays, I've always tried to find out what exactly he uses to get that really deep sound, like the really basic sound that gets on the guitar. But it turns out it's a octave divider, I think it's called, or something like that. I mean, you hear the song, it's just completely really based up that the guitar sound, it's amazing. But that's really punky, really grungy. That's another probably forerunner of where all the grungy guys got it from. That sound, I imagine. Yeah. And then last song, The Night Is Tonight's the Night, which is from the album Tonight Tonight, which was recorded after the tour to kind of promote Harvest, the one that I talked about before, really. But he played a lot of music that nobody had heard before instead of playing all the Harvest stuff. But that was during the tour that's Denny Whitton, the guitar play from Crazy Eyes died of a heroin over those because I think Neil Young sent him away on the tour after about before the first gig even, because he couldn't perform because of the heroin addiction he had. And then when he got home, I think he overdoses. He died and that sent Neil Younger to a spiraling depression at the time. And that's where Tonight's Night comes from.


Participant #1:

Well, then the song it talks about, obviously, Danny Witten, but then it also talks about a roadie called Bruce Beret who was a working man and he died of a heroin over those as well, during the that's what I talked about before. Damn Face. Yeah. So it's just another really depressed song. But from what people generally call the Disk Trilogy after Harvest, where they released three albums that just completely different in tone, really depressing, really low and depressing and revolutionary, kind of. This version again, it just goes on forever and ever. So it's in the new studio version. The studio version is a little bit messy, but this version is just completely executed. Yeah. I enjoyed this track, into the Black. My first thought is, that's how you should end the album. Why are they tacking on another track? But it's actually really good album Closer for this compressed live album. I love the vocals with the harmonizing on Tonight's the Night, that Lear. But then the solos remind me of the old Crosby, Stills and Nash and Young live sets. Yeah. I say this in a good way. The solos in this one don't sound like into the Black or Cortez or Cinnamon Girl. They sound like Southern Man in Ohio and just those old style carry on, those old tunes. That's what it sounds like during the solo sections. Yeah. Like the Four Way Street live on Bike. Yeah, that's the one I'm thinking of. Yeah, that's what it sounds like to me. Yeah, exactly. This track would sit fine on that album. Exactly. Like I said, it's just a classic Closer Again. It's just a long jam session that goes on for Evan and the music stops and the vocals go on and then it picks up again. It just ends with such an explosion of sound. So it's probably the perfect ending to the album, like you said. Yeah, this was a really good album. And topical, I don't know the exact air date of this particular episode, but we are just in the height of Neil Young pulling the stuff from Spotify. So when this airs, I probably will not be able to link the album to Spotify like I usually do. Right, okay. Yeah. That's a shame because on the Spotify, the version, of course, the longer version that they had to cut a minute off on the CD version. Well, I think it's YouTube anyway, so it's really easy to go and Spotify and put the long version caught as a killer on. But now, obviously, it's a little bit more difficult. If you go to Apple Music now, there's a great big banner at the top and it says, the home of Neil Young. Okay. Yeah. So this stuff wasn't planned at all. No, there's not more to that story. You got to lost the guy. I mean, he does what he wants, isn't he? I definitely think there's a business reason behind all this. There's contract stuff that the whole Pull my Music or Joe Rogan. Yeah, that's bullshit. No, I personally think there's business reasons all this was done. Yeah. What do you really care about it? To be honest, to me, that's a question. But then he's never really been a guy to purchase opinion under the carpet. This is true. This is true. I mean, about 15 years ago, I made a whole album about impeaching President Bush living with war that came out of nowhere as well. He had a crazy album that I enjoyed. It Americana Got You, which had like Ocuzana and these old school tunes. It was fun. I don't know if he was making a statement or anything. Like he wanted to do an album of weird Southern folk tunes. Yeah, exactly. But the guy is really one, so he's got a lot of them for it. Yeah. And you can pull it off as well. Sometimes for other people might sound a bit gimmicky, maybe for New Young as well, but he gets away with it. The guy can do anything. He can do everything. Yeah. He lived, still living, obviously, but he's a surviving member of the 60s singer songwriter group. That him and Joni Mitchell and all them. They all wrote together and then he's one of the few that still maintains some sort of relevance these days. All the rock groups still hold him with reverence. Yeah. I mean, the guy releases an album every year or so. Every year he's got like 40 something albums. Olds, it just keeps going. They had another one out just a couple of months ago. Barne. It's like him and Van Morrison who's going to pop out. They both have over 40 screens. That's another one. Controversial. Van Martin. So Live Russ made your top spot. What albums made your shortlist? Right. Shortlist a couple last year because I turned 28 february and February of 28 days, I decided to make a top 28 of albums okay, cool. Yeah. Which I put on my Facebook and Instagram and everything and all that stuff. At the time, actually, this album was a number two, but like I said, I think the last year or so, it has shifted to number one. I mean, I can't go beyond anymore. But the album that was number one on that list was Morning Glory by Oasis. Great album. Yeah. But another reason why I decided to go for live roast is because I think there might be more interesting stuff to tell about Neil Young and Weavina than Oasis. But then other albums back in black. Acads of a classic yes. Pronounced Linnett Skinner. Like, obviously, Linux getting yeah. Beastie Boys a bit different, but false Boutique by the Beastie Boys. Yeah. There you go. Irish 274, another live album by Rory Gallagher. Okay. Rory Gallagher was an Irish guitar player that was within, like, the touring blues community, a really big figure, but nobody really knows about Rory Gallagher unless you're really into that. But it's another album that's just live album. Another one where all the songs that he plays in album are just bearing the studio recordings. Just the ultimate execution of all in some. There's a couple more I can name, like the White Album by the Beatles. It's another one that's up there acting Baby by you two. Okay. I mean, there's so much I mean, you could go on forever, but great Islands, those are a couple that were in my top ten, wish You Were Here. But Pink Floyd is another major one. Yeah. So those are where you get kind of the picture of where I get my musical inspiration from and how I look at it and stuff. So, yeah, I talked to Animals for my album at the end of the first season, but I almost picked Definitely Maybe by Oasis. Okay. Yeah. I really love that album. I didn't have much to talk about it other than just I love the tracks. I didn't have the insight or the story to talk for a decent amount of time on it, so it was one of the reasons it got bumped down on the list. But I've always loved that album. Oh, I do rock and roll star slide Away, one of my favorite songs of all time. Yeah. Someone will bring Oasis to the table at some point, I'm sure. Oh, yeah, that's great. I'll definitely listen to it. Like, Animals are a great album by Pink Floyd. I mean, Dogs is just an amazing song. Yeah. Don't get me started on Animals. I'll talk for another hour. I won't keep it alone. Well, before we wrap this up, please tell our listeners what you're working on, where they can find you and anything you'd like to talk about. Right. Okay. So last month, I released my debut single or baby single. It's the first single, about nine years that actually released. But I kind of see it as a fresh start because I did it before I moved to England. I'm releasing a hole, so now it's kind of the first thing I've released over here. So it's kind of a fresh start, which is Alcohol, which is on Spotify, Apple Music. If you go to Julian.com, you can pretty much find links to everywhere. There like the Sound Club, Reverb Nation kind of stuff. And Spotify, Apple Music, whatever you can think of. We have a next single, slated floor release on the 18 February. I think it is 18 February. Okay. So, yeah, I would say follow me. Follow me on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, wherever you want to spotify, follow me. Like the songs. Help us out and keep tuning for the latest releases coming up. I'll be aiming to release about three new singles within the next three months or so. That's definitely some new stuff on the way, which I'm really excited about. Yeah, I've listened to Alcohol quite a bit. Great tune. Thank you. And I'll be putting links in the show notes for all your social media pages, and I encourage everyone to check them out. Good stuff. Thank you very much. All right, well, Juliance, I'd like to thank you for your time today. It was a pleasure to sit and talk with you about Neil Young's live rust. No problem, Steve. It's absolutely a pleasure to be on your show. I'd love to do it again. We'll make that happen. Thank you for listening to Music rewind podcast from the Sidereal Media Group and as I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time,


Participant #1:

a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. Back to you. Anchors.




1 view0 comments
bottom of page