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Led Zeppelin III with guest Michael Boroski

Updated: Aug 16, 2022

Show Notes and Transcript

Music Rewind welcomes returning guest Michael Boroski to discuss the classic album Led Zeppelin III.

Album: Led Zeppelin III

Artist: Led Zeppelin

Year: 1970

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Transcript as follows:

Participant #1:

Joining me today is another returning guest on music rewind Michael Boroski. You will remember Mike from our season one episode, Talking Pearl Jams Vs and also our three part nineties music roundtable. Mike is the music nerd that is the keeper of all the music spreads sheets. Welcome back, Mike, and thank you for being on the show. Thanks, Steve. Happy to be back, man. I feel like I've been on this journey since the beginning and I just keep following. I'm looking forward to season three. I got so many more records to talk about. Yeah, you've been with us since the beginning, so you're a perennial part of the show here. Hashtag friend of the pod. Well, Mike, let's get right on into it. What album would you like to bring to the table and why is it special to you? Well, Steve, this time I'm going to go back to a little classic rock mainstay, Led Zeppelin. But I'm going with their third record, which is amplified on three.


Participant #1:

I chose this one because, honestly, it's like the bridge from the super kind of heavy metal sludgy type stuff from one and two to Led Zeppelin for the Zozo record or however you want to call it, where they're trying a lot of different things here. Honestly. Another reason is my favorite record is Tangerine is one of my favorite Led Zeppelin songs, like, of all time. And I know it's kind of surprising because most people are like, I love Stairway or Immigrant Song even off of this record alone. But there's something about the intro of the guitar yeah. That faux intro that starts it and then it restarts. Yeah. And then they play it again. And Jimmy Page wrote this when he was still in the yardbirds. So this song is, I think, like three or four years old at the time when he brings it to the band. But, yeah, so pretty pumped. Let's rock and roll, even though that's not on this record. So how did you discover LEDs up in three or Led Zeppelin in general? Well, Led Zeppelin was definitely a band that was in the house. I remember my dad had the Led Zeppelin box set on cassette that had the field that was like a UFO thing and then a Zeppelin coming over the cross of it. And it was kind of just like the almost like the greatest hits, but it was Ford cassettes and they just mixed it up. And so I never really heard it. But again, I was listening to this at nine years old when I was delivering the Bureau County Republican around town. So I don't know how many nine year olds, besides kids from the 70s or even, like, mid 80s would be rocking out to some of these songs that are at this time might be 27 years old. But, yeah, it was definitely something my dad had in the house. And I found out recently that apparently I'm a bigger Led Zeppelin fan than he was because he told me after the first four or five records that they didn't make good music anymore and it was a waste of time to listen to anything past that. I was kind of surprised. I was like, you're the whole reason I listened to Led Zeppelin and I got into them, like, this is one of my favorite bands of all time. Like, they replaced the Beatles once I got into them because I just loved the power of all of them. Like, all four of them. Just the power that comes from all of them. I just got done reading Beast, and it's an autobiography about sorry, biography. It would be tough if he had an autobiography out. True. Yeah. John Bonham, right? Yeah. John Bonham. And it's John Bonham's biography. Forward was by Dave Roll. So that's what kind of caught my attention. And just bottoms drumming, like, on anything was just amazing. John Paul Jones, which I actually saw play with them, crooked Vultures, dave Girl is a drummer in that band. That's cool. And then the guy from Queensland Stone Age as a singer. And just to see John Paul Jones play an instrument. I've never seen Jimmy Page, which I would love to just to see him play guitar if they get him out of this crypt or done with that, deal with the devil or whatever he has. And then Robert Plant, like, he's so in the 70s, man. I'm a straight man. But Robert Plant in the 70s, that is a good looking man right there. Yeah. To see those guys live in the 70s, especially the early 70s, in their prime, would have been fantastic. I'm jealous of anyone that got to see it. I would rather see them than in the 70s in their prime than the Beatles in their prime, or Nirvana in their prime, or even any of these bands. Because I think Zeppelin, they were the first arena rock band that could sell out places like the United Center. And their manager would get, like, 25% of the money upfront there's. All these things that he would do to get all this money on promotions, and they would just tour nonstop. Yeah. I was researching them a little as far as their origins today and their first record deal as Led Zeppelin. Even before, I think it might have been still Led Balloon. They were not decided yet, but they actually got in. Today's money would have been over a million dollar advance. And the record company hadn't even heard them play yet. It was all through their reputation. And Dusty Springfield. Dusty Springfield was I guess she was a friend of John Paul Jones. And her influence to the record company was, just do it. You won't regret it. Just do it. Yeah. John Paul Jones and Jimmy Page were like, big session, guys. So a lot of people knew John Paul Jones because he could come in, and he was always reliable with the Base or The Oregon or mandolin guy, plays, like, ten different instruments. And then Jimmy Page somehow ended up he joined The Yardbirds last, but somehow ended up owning the name the Yardbirds. Yeah, you could say that. I don't know how he did it. But when he was putting together the band. They were originally going to be called. Like. The New Yardbirds. And they actually did. I think. A couple of shows under that moniker. Like. When they first started playing. And then I believe it was either Keith Moon or Pete Townsend. And they were telling them about the band. And they're like. Well. That will go over like a lead balloon. And that's kind of like how they came. And then they spelled just Led instead of Le Ad, you know, it's clever rock star stuff. Yeah. And it becomes just iconic. As far as the name itself, how it's spelled, I mean, the logo on your shirt right now, it's one of those iconic just band names. Yes. For years, I always misspelled The Beatles, or, like, if it's a beetle, a bug, I'm like, I know it's right. That's Beatles and Led Zeppelin. The word lead, right, is Led. And I'm thinking these guys, the way that they change the names. I don't think Corn spelled with a K, though, so I think we're okay there. So how did you zero in on Zeppelin Three as your favorite? Because obviously Two and Four are very popular, fantastic albums. Their whole catalog is great with a few lower exceptions, but two, three, four, that's a hell of a stride. Yeah. Honestly, the first Fire records are the first six, seven, honestly, all mixed up Koda, because Koda was just a bunch of stuff that they threw together. Present doesn't really hit with me presence. Isn't that Achilles last stand, though? Or am I thinking of him through the outdoor because I like his Achilles? Yeah, because I think that's got to be Achilles last. Dan. Because that one's because that's fantastic. I mean, an amazing song. But yeah. Left up on three. I just loved their when I would randomly hear the songs on the tapes from my dad, I always loved to hear them acoustic and really not see, but hear how Jimmy Page could play that and could hear that, like, how honestly beautiful how those guys play. And one of the songs, I think I want to say that's The Way or Celebration Day, that Bottom actually plays with, like, spoons, because to make it how soft he can play. And people are always saying he's so loud, but he's, like, such a technically perfect jazz drummer that he could play that way, and it sounded like he was louder than he really was. And he's the one who made the drummers, like, important. I mean, I know Ginger Baker and Keith Moon were there, but Bottom was like, a guy who's, like, he wanted to be like, yeah, I know there's two soloists in this band, me and Jimmy. Like I am the band. When he was on stage in Silver, he was cocky, but he was a fun guy and he was a good guy, but he also pretty mean, drunk, and he didn't like to travel away from his family. So that was a big thing. That's why it's one of the reasons he partied so hard. But I think that just how Light Bottom could play on this, and then just how the melodies and how beautiful a rock band could sound without, for the most part, just kind of being like a guitar and some orchestral stuff, but not like the Beatles, not like having George Martin there, putting the whole thing together. It's like John Paul Jones and Jimmy Pagelake putting all that together. They were the producers on this. Yeah, I'm kind of similar as far as my discovery of the album. You remember the Page implant unplugged back in the day? Yes. It was unleaded, wasn't it? Is that what it's called? Yeah, it was unleaded, but they played Gallows Pole on there, and that I had never heard before. I was well familiar with all the other hits from them and LEDs Up before and all that from at that point. But I never heard Gal's pool. This was fantastic. And that's when I started reading. Was this a one off for the show? I didn't know. And then that led me to this album, to where I finally was able to buy it because I couldn't find it anywhere at the time. Musicland didn't really have the full catalog there. It's not one of the big if you're always going to find it, it's going to be one, two, four. In houses of the Holy. Yeah. And if you're lucky, Physical Graffiti will be there. And then this is like the 7th record, if people think of I didn't find the full album to own until I was actually in the military by that point. Wow. Illinois Valley. I think that was a BMG purchase for me. That was where I finally bought it, listened to the whole thing, loved it. Several takeaway tracks for me, and then shortly after that, Almost Famous came out, and it worked out perfectly for me that I had committed the album to memory. Loved the whole thing. And then that movie features, I think, two of the songs, or three maybe. But it was like, oh, it just fit perfectly in my life as far as that album than that movie. In sync. Fort, honestly, just an amazing movie. And what's so awesome about that movie is the band streetwater. That's Led Zeppelin. The first time he went on a tour for a rock band when he was 15 years old, they sent him with Led Zeppelin. It's a mixture of Led Zeppelin, the Eagles and Almond brothers. Yeah. The specific characters are taken from each right well, there is that part in Almost Famous where they have their arms around each other and they're singing that song and then they're like, hey, enemy. Well, Cameron crow like pro jam. They did that to him because they called them the enemy. And they were like, hey, come here. And they did that with him. So he added some really cool things in that. And then I loved Almost Famous because that to me was, I felt like the closest you're going to get to, I don't know, like Zeppelin and I know Zeppelin's in the movie, and I think Bowie is in there, too. But like Zeppelin, there's just something about this mystique I think about this record to me, think about, honestly, like Immigrant Song. My wife said tonight, I didn't even think about it. I totally forgot it was in Shrek movie, the third movie. Princesses storm the castle? Kind of. Yeah. That was not even the one I was thinking of. I was thinking of Jack Black and School Rock. Yeah, I think it was a DVD extra where he actually did a video essay and sent it to Les Zeppelin to say, please let me use if they could afford it because they are super expensive to have. And then that I also think of, and I can't remember what Marvel movie it was that Thor gets the hammer back. Is it ragnarok? Yes. Right. When he says Hammer of the guy. And I knew the song was going to play in the whole movie, I'm like, I would be shocked if they don't play Immigrant songs. And then you read the lyrics and you're like, holy. It really is about Vikings coming to reap and pillage England.


Participant #1:

It's crazy because it is. It feels like that big momentous thing, like that song, because the way they kick it out. Well, to get into the tracks of the album that's obviously track one song, apparently they wrote that as in a fun, arrogant style. They were the Vikings pillaging. Yeah. And then valhalla. I'm coming. Was the whole thing too? That one might have to be ended out for the kids.


Participant #1:

I think when we first talked about doing this, I read that and I was like, this is amazing. It's so ridiculous. But that to me, that Immigrant songs, obviously, I think the song everybody knows of this record, the Top, I'd like to think that these guys were savvy enough and sarcastic in their minds enough to know that. So let's upload one and two big rocking albums. That's what everyone knew them for. So we're going to make track one our biggest rocker off this album, right? Lure you in and then all right, now it's time for something different. That's like the High Fidelity, how to make a mixed tape. You got to come out swinging, hot one. Come out swinging. And I mean, this is one of the biggest swingers that they have, really, because it's in all their live sets after this moment, like it's one of the biggest ones they play. Immigrant Song would fit fine on Led Zeppelin, too. It would fit right in there, yeah. And I think it was one of the first ones they wrote off this and then a lot of the acoustic stuff, because they went to Branuar place in Wales. I never know how to say it. Bronze. Yeah. If it's anything close to sounding French, I'm like Ricky Bobby. You got a dog. Pink butter matt. I got it right here. It's a cottage in Wales. It stood at the end of a narrow road just outside the small market town of Mahrey. You look at me in Glenar, yeah. And I apologize to everyone in Wales for Butchering we're so sorry. That was the only part of the UK I didn't get to. When my wife and I went to the UK back in 2018, wales was the only part we didn't get to. My ignorant ass. I didn't realize that in Wales they kind of have their own language that dates back centuries. Until I watched the crowd, I did not know that. But yeah. Immigrant Song definitely. It is my number two favorite song off that record. It might be one of my least top ten Zeppelin songs. And that one will always be on SM radio on a classic rock station until the world employs rightfully so. Rightfully so, yeah. That's when they pick out and if they pick a slower one, that's always going to be Gallows Pole. I mean, that's the first song aside, too. But we can go back to Friends if you want. Well, walk me through how you listen to it. Do you go straight through or do you bounce around? Well, it's funny, I've been listening to the last couple of weeks or so, off and on. I just listened to it straight through. But usually what I do, if it was a CD or even the finals, kind of hard to do it on. But I listen to Tangerine first and then I go back and listen to it and then after Branyard Stomp, I stop it because I know this is one of my favorite records ever, but, man, I've never liked Hats Off To Roy Harper, ever. He was a great bull. I mean, Ron Harper. Just joking. I actually have in here, it's not my favorite on the album. It's tough to listen to for a minute or so. It's the reverb and the vocals and I just can't stand. Yeah, it's a bit jarring.


Participant #1:

Yeah. Especially after all that acoustic songs, right. And it's almost like a siren and you're like, what the hell just happened? This record, you made, it nine songs through and you put this on instead of, hey, what can I do? Which is the B side of the single that would have been nice on this album. It was written during this time and that is a classic rock staple, too. How's that song not on here? And then that come on, Jimmy. That's where you messed up Jimmy Page. You pay all those producer bucks. Yes. They could have put hey anywhere on this album and then ended with Bronzer Stomp. That would have been a good and that's what sucks, is, like, every time I get that song done, I see it start to tick over nothing. I'm like, all right. And I'll start back up at Immigrant Song because I'd rather you listen to it on vinyl because you're sitting there and by the time you get up, you already halfway through that song anyways. It's not long. No. It's one of the most frustrating Led Zeppelin songs ever. I think. For me. Because it's like this album's perfection because it has the softness that everybody kind of loves about Lizzie and Four. Because. I mean. There's big rockers on Lids Up and Four. But obviously Stairways on there and you know how Stairway starts. And there's a lot of that slowness in this that you can see that it's going to build to let that one for. And then you still have Immigrants on and out on the tiles. Since I've Been Loving You, like, when it starts to get towards the end of it, there's no real lighty rock around here, and I don't want to always bring everything back to Pink Floyd, but just like you don't have Dark Side of the Moon without Metal. No. You don't have Led Zeppelin Four without their progression through Led Zeppelin Three. No, because One and Two, I think on those first two records, there's like two or three slower songs on there. Communication breakdown and days of confusion yeah, but there's a couple of slower ones. But this one was so different and it got blasted by the music writers. Never really cared for Zeppelin anyways. And then this one was just like, See, I told you these guys suck. And it still went platinum and all that stuff. And then when they played them live, people were like, this is, like, way better. And they went back, and then Zeppelin Four came out and people were like, oh, I see what they're trying to do. And they would go back and buy three, which that's happened a couple of times with them, and I think that was Houses of the Holy. People didn't really dig after Four. And then Physical Graffiti came out and they're like, oh, okay, I see what they're trying to do. And then they went back and bought a bunch of Houses of the Holy. It was really weird how their sales went for a handful of records. Yeah. You mentioned Since I've Been Loving You, and that's one of my favorite blue songs of all time. Oh, right.


Participant #1:

There's several different versions out there. The actual studio version great. All the live versions are fantastic. They're all different in their own right, but they all just I don't know, they're just fantastic. What are the great blues rock songs? Yeah, Dan broke up. It's fantastic. Shout out to Danny. Yeah, edit that one out. But you could play that for him later.


Participant #1:

Obviously, if Elvis stole rock and roll from these guys, blatant Blues rip off


Participant #1:

at least the first couple of records, actually like, all right, well, this was obviously a cover and this but Jimmy grew up with that, like blues and he just loved blues guitars. And him and Robert Johnson, I think they both sold their souls to the devil. But yeah, that is just so bluesy and it's for like skinny ass white guys from the countryside in England that are making this noise and it's just a song that he definitely feels like he is missing out. And I think a lot of it was the touring because they just was nonstop for these guys. But yeah, that's like the number three song. I didn't even ranked my songs because I was like just because if I was thinking about how I like this record, it's like tangerine immigrant song. Since I've been loving you celebration even though it's weird, it would be weird to play Celebration without playing Friends because they meld into each other. Yeah.


Participant #1:

Live in Love and made and a communication breakdown live in Love and the one that they play back to back, usually on FM stations, like when you have it on shuffle or something and that song doesn't come up after it, you're like it's like Sergeant Peppers and then not. It feels weird after it. Yeah. But I think Friends and Celebration Day, definitely they have to be together just because immigrants came out and they were like, we're going to rock and Friends comes on.


Participant #1:

Not like no one told you. Could be way this day or whatever that song is. Folksy. Acoustic Celtic song about friendship,


Participant #1:

definitely. It's like, okay, hard left turn here. And they did and really they don't start rocking again until out on the Tiles, which is a John Bottom tune. Yeah,


Participant #1:

which that's one of the only ones that he wrote all the music for at the Page wrote like the guitar. Is that intro the same as Black Dog or is it just very similar? Well, I think they would play it live together, though, I think, just because I think it might be close. I think he just did that part and then he might have used the whole thing. But I know he basically I guess Bob was getting antsy. They're out in the country and he wanted to go get a quick point. And the names actually Out On The Tiles is what it's a slang for going out to the bars, hitting the bars, or it's like a dark pint was out of the tiles. But that's what my Bottom would always sing this song and Paige was like, he's driving me nuts. So he like played the guitar reform and then john just kind of went with it. I will say I got an interesting story. Like when we're done talking about the songs, about what they did when they were recording this, apparently, I guess there was a commercial back in, like, the seventies that Volkswagen, it said Unthinkable. And it had a Volkswagen in, like, a lake or something, and it was floating. And so these guys were like, you think that's real? And so John Bottom and John Paul Jones went into John Bottoms volkswagen. Because John I was like, I got one. He goes, let's just take mine. I don't care. The guy bought cars. One thing you love more than drumming was like cars. He'd buy a new car all the time and then just get rid of it or buy it and just tons of money. There's like, amazing stories about that in the book. And there he is. And for a little bit, they drive right in, and for a little bit, they do. They're floating and they're like, this is drilled. The two other guys that were with them, I think it was like a road manager or something else, saw that they started sinking. The water was coming up to the sides of the door, and the door shit, this is half of the biggest band in the world. And they run in and he was up to their waist so they could still get the guys out. And they open up the doors, and there's John Bottom just laughing his ass off. Think it's the funniest thing in the world. You're thinking, how many times this guy almost died? And then the way he dies, it's like, so stupid. But that's all I think. But I love that story. It was in the book, and I don't know if it's any other legs up in books or if it's just in the Bottom book, but I just think it's amazing that they're like, man, let's go try it out. I have so much money because you talk about Gallows pole hang


Participant #1:

and I'm with you. I kind of remember listening to it on those tapes that my dad had. But then I remember how excited I was when Robert Plant and Jimmy Page were going to play on MTV Unplugged. And I don't know what year that was because it was like 92. I want to say mid ninety s. I don't think we're in high school yet, though. Yeah, well, you had a stretch of years there where you had the Eagles on Unplugged, you had Eric Clapton Unplugged. You had Led do their thing. I think even Fleetwood Mac did one. So you had just all those classic rock bands coming back and reuniting. Right? I just remember because I was so pumped. Like, I was telling my dad, do you know they're doing Zeppa's coming back and they're going to play, and I don't know how they're going to do it. Like, joking. I'm like, didn't the guy die. The drummer isn't dead. And I'm like, yeah, well, obviously they're not going to have somebody else. And I just remember listening to that and going, man, it was so cool. And then I got pissed, though, because where's John Paul Jones, the guy wrote like half the music that's on this stuff. And I always thought for years, why doesn't just Jason Bottom just drum with them and just get over with it and just tour and let's see it? And obviously Robert Plant is kind of the reason they don't because he was like, this is my best friend. And they did a couple of shows. They did that Celebration Day, and then they did I think they did Live Aid also. I can respect, though, them not doing that under the Led Zeppelin name. They page and play it right? But Jason Bottom and John Paul Jones are there. That, to me, is Led Zeppelin. Because what's really cool about that book is he talks about Jason a lot and how Jason at like seven or eight years old, or probably even earlier, was drumming. And the one time I think it was the last tour they were on, so it was like 77 in the US. And John Bonham was like, hey, man, to his kid. He's like, hey, go in there and do sound check with the guys. I'm going to go listen to it. And I think Jason was like 13, and apparently it was like the guy didn't even know. And then all of a sudden they saw John in the corner, like, clapping for him, listening to it, and they're like, wait, that wasn't you. He's that good of a drummer and obviously he has his own stuff. But I grew up in Led Zeppelin. And what's he doing now? From what the book said, he's got his own band and he also plays on a lot of people's records. And then his sister is a singer, John Potoms sister, and she's got some stuff. And I think Jason Bottom's daughter Zoe is also a singer. So if you look them up on itunes and stuff, it's Zoe Bottom. And I didn't listen to any of it, but I couldn't believe it was crazy just about John Bottom, which I knew this was going to happen. I was going to sit down by John Bondam the whole damn time. Perfectly fine. Well, I talk about how great these fucking songs are on this record. It's on my wall. I mean, I don't want to walk you all the way over to my living room and be able to do it after the show because I have this thing that's like a wall of vinyl and my top records are up there along with a couple of my wives. But, like, Zeppelin three is up there. I have the Zeppelin three record. And the big thing about that record, I guess, when it first came out, is that it was delayed two. And a half months because of the pinwheel thing that's in it. Oh, for the cover with the different so the cover can always change. Yeah, it can always spin that. It took two extra months of it was delayed to try to do that. And I thought I always loved that, the artwork on that. I thought it was really cool even on CD before I saw the final because my dad did have it. I just never went in and dug it out. I don't think he did because that was the only LEDs up on record I had to buy. I got every other Led Zeppelin record basically handed off to me except three. I had to go buy it. And that's what I mean. Most people don't think about this record as much because there's not like four. Like four. You could play the entire Alban, any classic rock station in America, like, all nine songs on it. And people are like, oh, cool. They're playing the Led Zeppelin block, thinking it's like different albums and stuff. When I pillaged my dad's vinyl collection before I left Illinois, I asked, Where's all this up one? Don't you have any? He's like, I had those on a track. And he just stares at me until it hit me. Like, yeah, because those are good. HVACs are the worst. They disintegrate. I remember my dad had and Steve, I think we were playing I can't remember my dad still had the station wagon, like the grizz walls. I think that might have been he got rid of it right before he started youth football. But he used to have it for the first year of youth football, I think. And he had the HVAC player in there and he would grab them and they would just like, oh, listen to it and be like, I want to hear that song again. He hit a couple of buttons and all of a sudden it would just explode. We didn't have seat belts on and we're in the back. It's amazing. Like, that. We all did die several times over. So quick check of Jason bottom. He's done several albums lately with Sammy Hagar in the Circle, and most recently, he is joining Kid Rock on his Bad Reputation tour.


Participant #1:

No. Sorry to burst that bubble for you, man.


Participant #1:

That was kind of a lead. And now that I click on the link. Foreigner Grand Funk Railroad and Jason Bonhams. Led Zeppelin evening announced the special guest for Kid Rocks tour. Sounds a little better. Wait, so it's Kid Rock's tour? Kid Rock is likely the headliner, but then also on the tour is Foreigner, Grandfunk Railroad and Jason Bottoms. Led Zeppelin Evening. So those three bands who are classic staples, obviously Jason Bonham doesn't have a big band, but I could legit name like, maybe two or three Kid Rocks on. I could name like three for four albums.


Participant #1:

Aaron Lewis is playing at the Psychosilo in Sheffield. Wait, is it Illinois? Guy from Stained? Yeah. He's a country and western singer now. Is he really? Yeah. The same guy who sang Mud Shovel and was a big death metal guy or a big hard rock guy is now just selling his soul to get all the super white trash country western thing. I'm sure that's got a short life span to it. I would think so. It's $50 to go see him. And you know where Sheffield is at? Bureau county. $50 to go see a guy who I'm pretty sure won a Grammy. It's been a While, which was a good song at the time. Had your boyfriend Durst singing with him, right? Well, no. Come on now. That was from the Family Values Tour. Do you remember that acoustic version? And then he goes, Biloxi, this is the rule. And I'm like, dude, this guy's, like, pouring his heart out


Participant #1:

loud.


Participant #1:

Could you imagine if you're at a Pearl Jam show and Eddie veterans singing Black? And I'm trying to think of, like, a dumb white rapper that would do something stupid like that? I don't even know. Like, some idiot from the crowd coming out and going, my girlfriend. And then you'd be like, what the fuck? You'd be so pissed off,


Participant #1:

Springfield. Yeah, you're right, though. When you think back to that, it's been a while. That acoustic version he does pour his heart out on that song. That's actually a good version.


Participant #1:

Yeah, that's right. Yeah. And that's when he says it. I was like, if you listen to the Family Values Tour CD, which I had because I tried to rob BMG, blind BMG Columbia House, and I ran out of stuff to buy me and Danny just ran out of stuff and all the rest of it's corn Biscuit and it's all heavy. And then stain comes out. Did it have that wonderful corn song where him and Fred Derris do, like, a rap battle? It might have been on there. Yeah, I think that was on there. That's a gym. I always left. The way they sync with that is that they had Mud Shovel on. And then obviously the show is different, but Mud Shovel is on the CD, and then the next song is outside. Now, I'm like, first of all, I don't know who the hell is your set list guys, but you really bring the room down after the one song that fucking racks people out. But I can't believe I'm talking about staying. I'm so excited. This will be all edited out. No, it will not. We will keep all this in. We have a special bonus episode attached to this episode. It's the Mike's favorite bands from late 90s, early 2000s, creed, Lip Biscuit.


Participant #1:

Fucking acoustic. Creed. Also known as taste of the new.


Participant #1:

Start the band to start the get paid with arms wide open. So are there any tracks here that we have not discussed? We kind of bounced around the whole album. Yeah, I mean, we talked about Gallopole. Both of you and I were talking. It's easily my favorite track on the album.


Participant #1:

Honestly, I didn't know that that woman was there in the Unplugged. And then I didn't see her. And then all of a sudden she sings that part and I was like, holy shit, that is awesome. And they were really into, like they were starting to get into Indian mysticism and all that stuff, like type sounding. And they really went on these trips and obviously Cashmere and stuff, they really got into that stuff. And that woman's voice, I just loved it. I thought it was just so awesome because it was kind of like I didn't know that she was standing there. It was one of those things like I think even in the thing they pulled back that she was there because originally they just showed him singing and then they pull back and show her. I love the story personally, because for years I didn't really listen to the full lyrics to understand. They just sounded cool. So I'm humming along and singing little bits here and there with the song and it wasn't until years later, looking at actually at the lyrics, that you realize that, okay, yeah, this guy's trying to get out of being hung, right? Okay, sure. I didn't realize that. The final verse is The Hangman himself saying, thanks for the money, thanks for getting me laid, but I'm still killing you


Participant #1:

I've ever just listened to as a kid, I'm like, wait a second. I'm like, did that guy take all his money and then still kill him after bang his sister? She wore my soul. Now I'm going to laugh and pull so hard. See you on the gate. Ellis Pole that's great.


Participant #1:

I think it's like an old Celtic song and they just rearranged it. It's based on an old poem called The mayFREE from the Gallows, which I'm going to assume that you know what I mean. It sounds like this song and the Johnny Cash song 25 minutes ago. I always think of The Hangman's news part because Gallows poll, obviously the guy dies and then the same thing in 25 minutes to go where I'm hoping I hear from the governor, I got 1 minute to go. And obviously we know what happens at the end of the song, but those two songs are just like the imagery that both those songs bring because you can almost see like a guy like standing there in old English clothes, like noose around his neck. And obviously if it was like the life of Brian or something, it would probably be, you know what I mean, something like super funny. For some reason I mix it together every time I hear that song, I think of stuff in the life. Look on the bright side of life here last, a piece of shit when you look at it. Last a laugh and that's the joke. It's true. You'll see it's all a show. Keep them laughing as you go.


Participant #1:

I don't know why. And it should, because sad song. But like, you see those guys run up like, hey, good sir, the guy's like, all right, whatever you think you want to give me. He's like a creepy, almost like an Uncle Ernie type guy or whatever. Bring me your kids and all this stuff. That's weird. I got Uncle Ernie mentioned twice this season. Yeah, well, I do know Quadrichinia is coming up, so it reminded me of The Who and Tommy, which if you ever have my brother on the show, I think my brother would probably do Tommy. Absolutely. Because he doesn't load or reload Tommy as well. No, he would talk about the Who, Oasis or AC DC. Those would be his. And then that's the way it's just a great song, a great tune.


Participant #1:

Obviously we talked about The Stomp and Roy Harper, but the songs that weren't on there, hey, what can I do? How is that not on this record? That is the one thing that has always bothered me about this album, is flip that out. But they have 16 songs and then they put some stuff on Physical Graffiti and Coda. And then obviously you listen to the deluxe stuff. You can hear all that stuff. Some of them, it's another blue song that they got covered. But brownie yar is brownie yarn. It's on Physical Graffiti and it's like the acoustic version. I love that one. That's really a very pleasant listen. Yeah. And this record to me is like it's one of those ones that you put on the background and sit and have a beer out on the deck and it starts off hot. It's almost like you're grilling your food or something and getting all pumped up for the party. And then a couple of these songs you just pick off and you play at the end of the night. Just some good and Tangerine still hands down, number one Led up on song of all time.


Participant #1:

It's something about how sad it is.


Participant #1:

And we mentioned almost famous. It's the perfect song for that because the song itself is about a perfect woman in his mind that got away, which is Almost Famous. Right. It's just amazing how it's almost too on the nose. But the beautiful, strong I mean, Kevin says that he is a hell of a writer. You know what I mean? If you've seen any of his movies and you've read anything that he's ever written, he knows what he's doing in singles. He captured what it was like to be in the early 90s in Seattle and Almost Famous, he captures what it's like to be grown up in the dumbest things. And I don't know why I still think this. When I was a kid, I thought I was going to grow up and it would be like the 70s because of Led. Zeppelin and even before Almost Famous, this album, for some reason, these albums from Zeppelin, even this one for sure but it transports you to the kind of like this easy going party at the moon tower type stuff that goes on. But I just always thought we would be in the some reason when I got older. And then it became the then we restarted the whole millennia and it didn't work out so well on a lot of the music aspects of it. It made some mistakes. The music alone. There's been some great stuff and honestly, I keep up with all this stuff I can. But there's something about Zeppelin that I can listen to Zeppelin at any time in my life, any place and it transports me to a place I've never been. I feel that way. Like with Floyd, too. There's more of a different psychedelic thing with Floyd. Like you almost like you're in space when you listen to them but Zeppelin brings you to being out in a park or something and having a beer with these long hair hippies and just like relaxing and smoking a J or whatever and just enjoying being alive and enjoying the sun and the summer and the Zep. I don't know. There's something about Zeppelin that does that when I hear them every time. Even though I've never been to that place. I've never been to San Francisco in the late 60s or all these places. The closest I've gotten to seeing Les Zeppelin was my first bonneroo. There was a band called Les Zeppelin. Oh, yeah. The Leslie rocked. They were fantastic. They were like music mags and stuff all the time. Yeah, that was just me and my brother Tony at that particular Bare. And we made a point to go see them. They were great. Kick ass. Yes. I always get weird when people cover Zeppelin but I feel like I've only seen like a handful of people like, cover bands like Do Zeppelin and I don't know if like because Pro Jam covers last time but usually their covers are like, The Who are young. Like, Zeppelin is kind of not an easy band, I don't think, to cover. A lot of times it has to be a woman because there's something about Robert Plant like the way he does that. If soundgarden ever wanted to do it back in the day, obviously, remember that band I sent you, the main squeeze that covered I Have A Cigar? They do a cover of Since I've Been Loving You and it's really good. Yeah, that high pitched kind of voice. And it fits. Yeah. And that's the thing, is there's no way he's got a voice like Robert Plant except Chris Cornell. Honestly, Robert Chris Cornell's voices to me have always been real similar. I'm talking about their main range. Not like when Cornell hits Birth Ritual or something and you get that super high note or how growly he can be. But they have this in between range, the way that these guys sing like Chris Cornell sing that acoustic song the entire time. And so could Robert Plant. That and it doesn't sound like it doesn't sound like it's effortless. My number one singer of all time to me is Robert Plant. My favorite bass player of all time is John Paul Jones. My favorite drummer is John Bonham. Well, you got to be thinking now as far as you hear Beatles covers all the time, you hear who covers, you hear plenty of covers of Floyd I Wish You Were Here and other things. But Zeppelin, you don't hear too many famous covers. And the first one, honestly, that pops to mind is the Immigrant Song. But it's by Galactic, which is all instrumental, which is amazing. Definitely Google that. Galactic is a funk band out of New Orleans and they do a great Immigrant song. But I can't think of any, I really can't. No, I think that's what makes Zeppelin honestly the best rock band of all time just because they are so hard to cover. Because honestly, think of how many drummers that have like somebody that was within Bonham's stratosphere. You have, what, five drummers maybe? Really? Like you're talking like Ginger Baker, Keith Moon, Dave Roll,

the guy from Slayer. Just because I can't believe that guy could actually hit a kick drum that fast. You know what I mean? Like a drummer like that. Then you think of a bass player like. Okay. Well. We all know Getty leads a good bass player. But can he really do he plays the keyboards. But can he play how John Paul Jones and actually orchestrate that stuff at Whistles is a good bass player. But I don't think Antwistle john Paul Jones is like Antwistle. But with Pete Townsend's ambition of producing stuff. You know what I mean? Like, he can do so much more than any other bass player really can do. I mean, even Cliff Burton's base solo man, luke Boris might track you down and fight words after our quadraphinia episode. He's a big ant whistle fan. I'm just saying because I feel like John Paul Jones can play with Antwistle, but he also can play the keyboards and the organ. And I talk about this on the quadrafini episode. Is that what makes Keith Moon so great is Edwin's the two combined with Keith Moon have been that great without a whistle? I don't think so. John Bonham doesn't need John Paul. I thought the question to you, would John Bonham still have been that great without John Paul? Yes, I remember they didn't grow up with each other and play with each other and whistles all in Moon, like in Townsville. And those guys, they kind of came all together at once while Jimmy Page oh, I know Robert Plant knows his drawings. I know John Paul Jones from the Sessions. I do. And then they put them together and John paul Jones in the book The Beast, honestly, he goes, It's amazing how I followed him, and I'm just fucking John Paul Jones, man. It's not like it's a pushover bass player. It's not like a guy you've never heard of, but those guys suggest it's hard for me to even ask you that, because this is something as a lifelong classic rock fan, I have a newfound appreciation for all thes the bands that we've done on this show. And if you were to ask me before I saw this led Zeppelin, who. Great classic rock bands. Pink Floyd, et cetera, they're all.


Participant #1:

Even though they have their own little niches, but they're all just classic rocks. I feel differently now. You cannot compare the who to Led Zeppelin. Two completely different streams of and just like, I'm sure that if someone ten years from now is saying, sound guard, Pearl Jam, that's just Seattle music. Whereas and that's the same way I was looking at classic rock. That's just England music from the classic rock area. Whereas if you were to dissect them, you can't compare two completely different bands. Yeah, if you think about it, The Who is like I would say they're more straight ahead rock and roll than Zeppelin is because Zeppelin, they kind of created like the metal progressive thing like Tool covers, no Quarter. And you think about Tool and the way those guys play, they are very like and obviously, like, Sabbath created they're heavier. They're just like there's like, more the weight when they play. It just sounds like more you feel it more than you would the who is trust me, Bow O'Reilly is great and I love Quadrupenia and I love The Who's, knacks and all that stuff. And they have some heavy base. But the way that they produce the Zeppelin records, it feels like you think about, like, Days of Confused. That base was like compared to a lighter base. I really think, though, with the covers because there are a million covers of War, Pigs and Paranoid and everything, millions of The Who I mean, hell, the movie Tommy itself, you've got Aircraft and you've got Elton John. You've got plenty of thirds covering plenty of who songs. So there's a lot of who covers out there. But let's definitely you really kind of poke that and maybe our users out there. I have two. I just thought of the second one. Besides North Quarter by Tool, which you could only get, like, on their live disk thing. I don't think it's even on streaming services. You have to look it up. But the other one is this band from England. They were called Electricity. I think that was the name. And they covered Days of Confused but it was like four minutes long instead of nine minutes. You know what I mean? It's fast and it's really weird. Besides that girl singing Stairway to Heaven from, like the Conan show or something? I did. Yeah. I always think of Stairway. I always think of Wayne's World because that's why Jack Black asked because Zeppelin is so expensive to have on a movie or anything like that. And when they get the $5,000 and Wayne goes in and play the guitar and he starts playing and the guy stops and playing, it says, no Stairway denied. Because they, like, ask great joke. Because they actually asked Zeppelin if they could do it. And they're like, no way. You owe this. And there's a small budget film from Saturday Night Live. And they're like, yeah, no, we don't really give a shit. You're not fucking over our music. Yeah. Queen, which is so funny because Queen was still a band longer than Zeppelin. To me though, he's a pretty Mercury tribute concert in he's saying a Crazy Little Thing Called Love, does a good version of it. Robert Plants got that whole song, he had like a whole Elvis cover type thing and then him and Alison Cross have been doing stuff for years, they said, on tour for


Participant #1:

I think he was kind of done with Zeppelin because after his child died, he doesn't have the voice for it anymore. I think he said that. Yeah. And he was losing like during the tours and stuff, the songs. He can't do them justice anymore so he doesn't want to do them. Yeah. You can tell from Celebration Day that I remember when they were going to play and the only way you could get to that concert if you weren't like a celebrity was you would win them through 18 t or some place that you could win tickets to go to the two to see Celebration Day, which was Zeppelin with Jason. That was in 2007. I've still got his Wikipedia up here. That's on like all the streaming services and stuff. That celebration day, and it is not Led Zeppelin. And they only have two live records besides that. And how the West Was One is a fantastic live record but I don't think it's like their best one. But they were anti tapers. Fame is kind of hard to watch at times. I see it once and I think I was young when I saw it for me. Yeah, they didn't want to put it out and the only reason they put it out was Robert Plant broke his leg in a car accident and while he was rehabbing. But we got to do something until they put that out and people still all went to it and saw it and I'm like I don't know if mean they would break tapes. They were like big anti tapers. Like their manager, he would go into the crowd and destroy people's tape decks and stuff and all that stuff just to not have them be recorded. And I'm thinking, why would you not like at least pull that off the sound bar? Five sets in song remains the same are great. They've got these little vignettes of each individual band members at their house, which is sometimes a little weird. Like there's a wizard at one point, I don't know, but it's been a while since I right. That's what sex that's what you have for Live, obviously. Live At Leads is one of the greatest live albums of all time. And the fact that they gave the like they finally put out the expanded version with Tommy Live and everything like because the first Live At Leads was just one album and it was like twelve songs or something. But then they finally put the full thing out and like, that's amazing. You have that record. Then Zeppelin, they have his name that everybody pans because they have them walking around their houses like God knows what. But yeah, the live stuff ridiculous. I mean, you said Gallows poll. But besides Immigrant Song, I'm cutting the three out that you already were digging. But how about the stuff that's not singles for you if you're like? Man, when I hear three, which some people don't listen to this record. They just pull they pick the ones off. That's why I'm hoping to get some Tangerine streams tomorrow or whenever it comes out. So my main takeaways for this are always going to be Gallows Pole, Tangerine. That's the way. And Braun your song.


Participant #1:

I think you take out Roy Harper. The second half of this album is just banger after banger to me. I love it. It's great. It shows off the talent of the whole band with different instruments. And obviously Jimmy Page is just perfect form. And then Robert Plant's voice hits these songs with it's almost bluegrass at times. Yeah. I could see Medicine Show may be covering some of these songs. Yeah. Didn't they have like something back out years ago? It was one of the first bluegrass covers. One. And I thought it was Zeppelin or it was the Beetles and then Zeppelin. I loved it. And it was like bluegrass covers of them. I remember something like that that they came out with. And I don't know if it was Lisa. I know there's a band called Stephen Siegels that does that bluegrass versions of old rock tunes. Like they did November rain and stuff. But they do a good version of Thunderstruck, which is Washboards. Oh, yeah. I love them thunderstruck covers. Not a lot of HCDC coverage, but then again, there's not a lot. He thought there's only one Bon Scott. And then we're going to find a guy who actually put his vocal cords into a blend and decided this thing at the same time. When you get to me, friends, Celebration Date. Okay. All right. Not Skippable, but they're just kind of there. What's crazy is that Celebration Day is like a staple for their live shows after this comes out. And they name that live record Celebration, which I'm with you. Those two songs I'm like because it's maybe the way they sequence the polls down between Immigrant Song and Since I've Been Loving You. And those are two heavy hitters, right? They really are, because you got those two heavy hitters and then out of the tiles. Great song. We talked about that briefly. It's good. Classic Zeppelin to me. Yeah. It fills that void. But then from Gallows Pole all the way to Bronier Stomp. Beautiful. That's why I've always been a fan of the second half. I love Immigrant Song because Immigrant Song doesn't seem like it should be on this record. You're right. It makes no sense it should be on two or four. It could go right next to Black Dog. And you'd be like, it probably is on, like, a greatest hits or like, a compilation from there. It's probably like Black Dog Immigrant song. Black Dog And then stirring. That's just how you could see that compilation could put together. You just trade out. Hats off. Or hey, what can I do? Which is like, how many people have probably said something on your show about one of their favorite records? This song wasn't on here. Absolutely. There's always almost always one track that you're just kind of it was a weird decision. Why did they put it here? Why did they include it? Why did they just slice off that one and then leave it as is? Yeah, and I guess that would be Rats on verses, but I like Rats, so there's, to me, like, Rats Versus versus was, like, the first one I picked, like, the common House b. Great. Like, ten tracks of beautiful poetry. And then that 11th track is the Generic. Let's get all my rapper friends to just spout gibberish for a generic beat and we'll put a track on it. You take that off, it's a near perfect hip hop out. Yeah. And I will say, with all my top five favorite records of all time, two of them are legit. Like, there's not a song I would take off. And we haven't talked to either one of them. But revolver by the Beatles. There's not a song I would take off, and there's not a song I would move nothing. And then Ziggy Stardust and Spider Schmalers by David Bowie. There's not a song that I go, oh, I got it. Like, whatever. Versus is great. I love Rats, but people are probably like, Rats is terrible. And then this is hats off to Roy Harper. And then my fifth record, Computer filter Happier, which is just like, him messing around like an old MacBook, like, typing out, like, better health techniques. That's all it is. And so it's super annoying, but it's a great record. And you would always think, like, oh, man, if it's your favorite record, it has to be flawed. But I don't think it does. And this is a shout out to my critic out there who, if I really cared, I would remember his name. Sorry, out there, but I mentioned on my Animals episode that Metal is a 75% gray out, but Shamus and Pillow of Winds are unlistenable. They're just not good songs. I mean, it's cool that he had the dog howl because of playing the Blue. My one critic out there said that I'm not a real Pink Floyd fan because I don't like Pillow of Winds. To each his own opinion there. Okay, sure. You know what? He should have said? You're not a real Pink Floyd fan. All the Pink Floyd fans talk about how great Final cut is. Fucking. It's a bad Roger Water solo record that's what it is. And there's maybe two tracks off that album that work in the movie of The Wall, like, as little sub. Yeah, their throwaway tracks make them happen and those are fine. I'm not mad at that because watching the movie The Wall is this. I remember watching it the first time when this is on, the Tigers broke free and things like that. Yeah. And that's a good song, but, like, the rest is fucking shit. And I hate those people that are like, oh, that's the one I like. And yet I'm picking Led Zeppelin's 7th best album up to most people. I was very happy you did because I personally hold Led Zeppelin three up on that high pedestal for Led Zeppelin. Led Zeppelin Two. Great. Zeppelin Four. Amazing. And I'm going to say it overplayed sometimes. They are always if you take a poll of 100 people on the street and like, hey, you know who Led Zeppelin is? If they say, yeah, what's the name of Led Zeppelin song? No one's going to go since I've been loving you out on the tiles, they're going to say scary to heaven, man. Or they would say, that one from the Thor movie. I know that's a Duplin song, right?


Participant #1:

Yeah. There's no anger about it. It's just funny just how and that's what I was saying. Like Pearl Jam. You're a real fan. Don't like no code. When no Code came out, I was like, this is fucking terrible, and I appreciated it. But people now are like, no Code is their best record. I'm like, there's no way that it is. It's not even possible. There's nothing wrong with being critical. No, trust me. This stuff that came jesus was talking to Danny about this the other day. Pearl James had a band since 1990. It's 2022, it's 32 years. So if Led if John Bonham never died, their last record would have been in 2010 no, sorry, like, 2000. That would have been their last record because they would have been a band for 30 years. There's a lot of bands that are definitely held in higher esteem because they either broke up or they lost a member of the band. And because they did not keep going, and I admittedly have not listened to Pearl Jam as far as their last, I don't know in my album, I don't really know in detail, but everyone from the Beatles to Pink Floyd to all those classic groups, had they kept going, I'm sure they would have put out some duds. Every single one can't be perfect. No? I mean, all you had to do is look at Rolling Stones. I'm not a huge rollers. I like the Rolling Stones in this conversation. I love Players Boutique and I love Sticky Fingers, but, like, think about their agency, you know what I mean? Like, these guys, how many songs you expect to constrain? Not everybody can be Bob Dylan. Bob Dylan was like, gigantic in the big in the disappeared in the mid to late 90s had a huge resurgence. The guy won Grammys again and he's still playing. He's like 100 years old and look how many I'm not saying I want to see him. I love Bob Dylan. He was on our list and we went song. He started singing his new stuff. He mumbled for 2 hours. No one understood a damn word he was saying. And I almost felt bad for him, I did because people were literally yelling, play Maggie's Farm and stuff and show up at the food store. But he just didn't care. He didn't hear and I don't know, it just wasn't a great show.


Participant #1:

Dylan has like these bootlegs out if you go I think on any of the streaming services they have their bootlegs bootleg. I think like six or seven is when he's playing with the Rolling Thunder review. Like that's. The Bob Dylan I'd want to see. Just that one, that's legit. And then maybe the tour before that. I'm talking 69 and like 76 and that's it. And after that or before, I want to bootleg tapes from the recordings he did with the band out of the old Pink House. And I don't know if they ever came out with that box set or not. It's out there on the streaming services because they had Bob come out. I think he gave the phone. I need to dive into that because that's the Bob deal in my life, playing with those guys and just a bunch of guys in the house jamming. And that's like right before Rolling Thunder review. Rolling thunder view is, like, harder. He rocks. He is electrified and he's kicking out the jams that might even be the band behind him at that time. Honestly, I can't remember the timeline how like they were his backing band and when he was in Woodstock and got the motorcycle accident and the guys from the band were up there with them playing and all this shit. Yeah, because the basement is out. It's called the basement case. That's out. Every year or two I'll get really big back into Bob Dylan and that's all I listen to for like a month or two straight. And then I'm like, I'm going to listen to stuff from the 80s, I'm sure. I'll like it this time. And I don't because he went through like he found God again. But I'm saying that he found God. His name is Robert Zimmerman. He's a Jewish man from Minnesota who found Jesus and made like three or four Christian records, like in the late 70s, early eighty s and Slow Train Coming is like if you got to look at the album cover, it's like a train, like a cross on it and stuff. Yeah, I just pulled up his Wikipedia and one of the subcategories is Christian period. Which is funny because it's like his name is Robert Zimmerman. He's 100% jewish man from Minnesota. Yeah, those are go through some Dylan stuff. I got really big into Dylan in college. And then I started getting about Dylan after I really got into the Travis willbury's. That was my kind of intro too. Yeah, that was my fucking old man's jam. He used to play Willbare Twist all the time. And that's not one of their best songs. No, but he just thought because my dad really loves the goofy witches and stuff like that. That's why I love that. He loves the Travis lovers. Loves them. And then I go, well, I would be like, hey, Alexa, play Tom Petty. He goes, oh, Tom Petty. That guy's a piece of shit. My dad doesn't like Tom Petty. And then I'm like, what about Bob Dylan? And he goes, I don't like Bob Dylan either. What about Roy Herbs? And he's like, Some of his songs are okay. I'm like, So that's three fifths of the band that you like. And she's like, yeah. He goes, I knew George Harris is in it. And that's really easy. Beetle. Does he like ELO? He does like ELO, but he likes my dad. He's a big Jeff Lyn fan man is all over all my dad loves, like, Leon Russell and he just likes the dingy guy. He said Zappa tapes and stuff. And I'm like, for example, a lot of this stuff is unlistable. And I like weird stuff, but some of that stuff is just garbage. And then the one day and this is funny. This will have nothing to do with Led Zeppelin, but my dad I went down to his final stuff and I'm like, how many different greatest sets of bread could you have? The Best of Bread. And he's like, what do you mean? I go. There's three best of breads down there. And I go, I don't know what the fuck is going on with that shit. So we talk about that in our classic rock roundtable. They gave that away with free magazines. They gave that away in the 70s. Best of Bread. That's probably why he has multiple of them. And so my dad hates Rush, hates GETTYLEE voice, everything. I remember when I was a kid and the first time I heard Tom Sawyer and I was like, oh, who's this lady singing? Like, It's pretty good. This is hard. And so it's so funny because I remember he was like, Rush is terrible. And then this is before his apparent hatred of Top Petty, which people still get loans from him if this is actually kept in. He's a good man. He's made some poor choices in his life, especially when it comes to Penny. But I was in the shower at their house one day and all of a sudden I could hear my dad just go alexa played Best of Bread because he knew I couldn't get out. I couldn't get out of the house. And I guess he and I were like, arguing about bread again for the 20th time. My wife's always like, Fucking bread. Why do you and your dad fight about bread? I'm like, I don't know. I'm so mad about them. And Poco like, hey, what's wrong with Poco? Come on. It's just the Wimpiest Eagle songs that they made. Even Wimpies through Poco is like a rite of passage to get to the Eagles


Participant #1:

of the eagles. There's no logins in the cena that we have to listen to all day either. I couldn't believe it. What goes up there with the flying Burrito brothers. Well, no. The Flying Burrito Builders has grand parsons. Like those first couple of records with Grand Parsons, he was actually the guy who got the wrong stones into the hockey talk woman and kind of created like alt country. And he was in the Flying Burrito brothers. And the birds like, the birds, Mr. Tambourine man like version that they do is very like alt country. But no, I can't about bread and the old man. And so what I did, I knew he was coming back and I was leaving and I left and I go, Alexa, play Russia's greatest hit, like on repeat for 5 hours or something. And he came home, I got a text. He goes. Well played, son. Well played. And my mom hates both of them. She's like, Fucking both these men sucks. I don't know what you're talking about. By the way, my mom, she's a good sport about she goes, I'm not even from New York, Michael. And I'm not a New York woman. That's Jewish. Like, this is ridiculous. I don't talk amongst yourselves. Are you sure? You feel a little bit clemped. She's like, Michael, seriously? I was like, you're more Jewish than I am. There's a whole other story that my great great grandfather was a stagecoach driver in the 1800 and he was Jewish and he met a Catholic woman from survival and married her, blah, blah, blah. Well, they had a whole burial of him because he was dead to them because he married a Catholic girl and he was Jewish. I was like, I go, so technically I'm 16th. And my mom would be like, an ace. I was like, I don't think anybody turned an ace down before mom. She's like, Shut up. You're talking drug references.


Participant #1:

I was like, that's a good joke. Do you ever watch Aqua Teen Hunger Force? I used to watch it in college all the time. Every time someone mentions Getty Lee, I think of Aquatine and see the episode with Zach Wild in it. Yes. At the end of the episode, Shay, he's like, Wait. He's like, Why is it snowing? What's that noise? Those jingle bells like, oh, shit, it's Kettley. I owe him money. Getty Lee comes riding in like a big bass guitar pulled by sleigh bells or something. I don't know. It's hilarious. It's so nonsensical. There's no way that I don't hear a Foreigner song and not think of the Foreigner belt with the moonlights come down. That's fry, man. You must have double vision. Are you hot blooded?


Participant #1:

15 minutes. When I do go to the office, I actually drive home past Cartoon Network in the William Street area. Yeah, that's awesome. I see it. It's right there. It looks very mailchimpy to where I work. It looks very neat. But William Street right there. I think I have the entire series on DVD because I was just a huge, I thought. And I didn't even smoke weed in college, man. Same here. I thought it was the funniest thing. It was great. I will say this, though. Like having fun gummies, it does make it really funny. It's funnier than you remember. You're like, Wait, I know this is supposed to be stupid, but this seems way funnier than it was. I mean, granted, I watched it extremely drunk. It was always something to put on when you're drinking and say, late at night, saturdays, turn it on. Then you got meat wands. You can't just tell me I'm drunk. Yeah. That's not a decision for you to make. Carlos best next to a neighbor, Carl. Hey, Mikai. Hey, man. Let's talk about it. Let's talk about this. Go, jets. And then after that, I think usually it was Space Coast. Coast. Now, that's a trippy show, too. They used to have humans on there and then kick them off. Oh, what a great fucking show. Old school Cartoon Network. I think they're on HBO max, right now. Wait, I saw that, and I was like, if you want to watch the entire series of Aquaticeen, it'll take us 2 hours. Every episode is, like, ten minutes. But moonlights were always the best. Like, they would like their guns, the way they would talk. That graffiti. You'll see the moonlights all over Iraq. You never see it in any of the news clippings or whatever. But soldiers drawing the moonlights all over the place. The moonlights were the best. They're also super easy to draw. We could jump really high. They were two dimensional. They were like Atari drawings compared to Nintendo drawings. It was like a step below. Yeah. Move on to our next little segment here. So let's have a three major top spot for this particular episode. I'm going to ask you about your shortlist, but I'm going to challenge you on the spot here. Classic rock shortlist. All right. Classic rock. You could have brought to the table three to five. What? You could have brought to the table instead of LEDs up on 300% Revolver by the Beatles. I know a lot of people. It's like Sergeant Peppers or Abbey Road or Let it be. But revolver. I'm an Abbey Road guy. Yeah. And I love Revolver because it's like the first time they kind of get psychedelic with it's. The change. Yeah. It's that shift. Yeah. I can't remember. I think it's a george Harrison song that's on there. I got to look it up because it's going to drive me nuts if I don't say it here, there and everywhere. Tomorrow never knows end the record, which is like super psychedelic and just one of my favorite songs. But it also has TAC, man. And Your Birthday Thing is one of my favorite Beetles tunes just as a solo track. And I will say you probably keep this part in, but like, Eleanor Rigby is like my mom's favorite Beetle song and Marissa's favorite Beetle song. And there's not one rock instrument on that song. It's all orchestra. I want to throw you a suggestion. Soul Live. Look up Soul live on YouTube in their version of Illinois Rigby. It's a medley of Illinois rigby and she's so heavy. Oh, yeah, I like that. It's all instrumental. It's a blues band out in New York. It's great. Just check that out. That is a good day, sunshine. Now I'm looking at it and I should look at it


Participant #1:

and then we talked about it before, like David Bowie, Ziggy Stardust and Spider from ours


Participant #1:

to me, one of just the best records that legit ever came out. There's not a bad track on the whole thing. Most people remember that. You start us and then there's five years and then there's I think half the record is singles. Well, I know it got a boost after Guardians of the Galaxy. The first one because of moon age daydream, moon agedream and Star Man. Well, Star Man surprised in the other two. Star man is a classic. Yeah, well, like Suffragette City. Like rock and roll suicide. These are great records. And you're making me look at classic rocks. I was like, I 100% pulled up my spreadsheet. Don't you worry. I knew they come out. Yeah, because I'm like, wait, hold on. Because I don't want to miss anything. I'm real pissed if I do. And, like, obviously let it be like I'm looking at Seventies right now. If I'm just going to say 70s, which, like, who's next? It's Paul O'Reilly. That's who's next that won't get fooled again I know people love Tommy and Quadraphenia, and Quadraphenia an awesome record. But who's next? Has Bob O'Reilly? And that's not even played with the guitar. The guy just typed some stuff in and made it. And then honestly, there's arbitrary shit and then there's Dylan bringing all back home. Blond on blonde. Jimmy Hendrix. Are you experienced? Obviously, I love Wish You Were Here, which I would say is probably my favorite Floyd record is Wish You Were here. So that always up. There is like a huge record to me. But, yeah, I'm thinking like pure class. My five classic rock bands, I would say I'm going to go to and listen to them all the time. It's always The Beatles, Zeppelin, The Who, Floyd and then Dylan. Those are like my five. Obviously. I'm missing Bowie and the beach. Boys. Yeah, that's a hard one to narrow it down to five, right? But then, honestly, one of my favorite classic rocks on all time is crossing like, wooden Ships. Wooden Ships is crazy. Like White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane. And we were lucky, I guess, that our parents were like the first generation of like, people that listen to rock and roll and didn't think it was weird. There's probably like, people in their seventy s that are probably like, rock and roll is kind of different and we really didn't care for it. We really liked a lot of, like and then when I mean, like rock and roll, like sixty s and seventy s, rock and roll, like the classic rock, like Elvis is not played on classic rock station. And it's funny. Luke and I talked about this on the Quadraphenia episode, which hasn't come out yet. And it's weird because growing up, it's classic rock. The way we perceived it, whether it's Elvis, Buddy Holly all the way through the late, was just old school rock, classic rock, so many different genres all encompassed into just classic rock. And then you watch Quadrafina or List of Quadraphenia, and there's this big rivalry between the mods and the rockers. Whereas the rockers are, well, rockers. They like the RnB, heavy hard rock style. And then the mods are more for the who or Rolling Stone style stuff with the Inks. And they were going at it. They hated each other because in a biggie tupac sort of way. Whereas we grew up thinking that's just all classic rock. Yeah, I always thought that was one of the things I always talk to my cat. I was like, okay, so all this music came out. What did you do? I couldn't imagine just hearing it for the first time, because you've never heard anything like it. When we heard it for years of our lives, it was background music that we didn't even recognize because we were too young to figure out, you know what I mean? Like from the ages of birth to, let's say six or seven, you heard it, but it was like background noise music to you. And then you're like, oh, this is music. But then there's also other music that's out now, but this is really good stuff. I can't imagine putting the needle down in here in the beginning of Dark Side of the Moon, and nothing else has come out like that or like Black Sabbath, like paranoid, like the first time that got put down just to hear that. Something that's so different that you never heard. Like you had Elvis and then obviously the Beatles, but then the Beatles even changed. It's like crazy to imagine that. Yes, but on the flip side,


Participant #1:

we did live through the era of like, Van Halen. 1984 came out in 1984, right. We were too young to notice it, but it was still in our era. But when you look at high school. We got to live through our own version of that with never mind with Ten inversus okay, computer. We got to put those CDs on and live our own version of classic albums. Hearing them for the first time, I would say that my only thing is and I love Pearl Jamming and Song Garden and all these bands that we listen to, those guys are so heavily influenced by the bands that our parents, like, heard for the first time. Nobody before that. There's nobody 20 years before Zeppelin one, like, in 1049. There's nobody with an electric guitar. Yeah, but there were those blues artists that they all pulled from, but at that time, there's


Participant #1:

no proper recordings, right? And there's no way to hear it. Like, you think about, like, let's Apple is not pulling from Benny Goodman's orchestra as simple as, like, just classic Neil Young. There's been folk singers, right? And so that sound kind of pulls the whole way through from Peter Paul Mary in the there's always, like, a guitar player and a singer type thing, and that kind of pulls all the way through. That's something they've heard. But then, let's say, like, Sergeant Peppers, there's nothing that came out before that, really. When Jimmy Hendricks went on stage and did something with an electric guitar. You can go now. I understand. Navana. It's almost like it's the greatest generation. I feel like that was the greatest generation. I'm going with it, and trust me, Steve, obviously I listen to music all the time, but I can't imagine it would be like to hear I feel like it's almost like we're like Blessed Amber Curse because we got to hear all this stuff. Plus the stuff that happened in the makes you almost like the shit that comes out now. You're like. That's exactly how I feel. I want to like it, and I do. There's a lot of stuff I do like, and then I look at it and I want to teach my niece and nephew about, hey, you got to listen to this. And Ray listens to the 90s stuff all the time. And they asked me, they're like, well, come on, do you know this band? I'm like, fucking course I do. How are they not know it? I'm pretty sure I told your dad about them and your mom. I used to drive them to school. But I think especially when we were Days of Confused came out, and the 70s culture was really big when we were in high school, people really smith came back, for Better or for Worse, the Eagles, Mac, you know what I mean? Like, all these bands, like, came back that were like big 70 staples. I remember like hell. Freeze is over. Came out. I was like, what the fuck are you talking about? I don't even know those guys. Maybe they just made shit records like Bob Dylan did, like in the know what I mean? Comes through the camera and strangle you. No. You know what I'm saying? Why did it freeze over that these guys aren't playing with each other and then they had a resurgence. I'm confused because not Zeppelin, but the Eagles are always in my mind because they were always there. It wasn't like, oh, man, I've been waiting ten years for a new Eagles record. We fucking had all the Eagles, and we had all Zeppelin in our minds. Everybody was either dead or they just didn't give a fuck anymore. Nobody was like, oh, you don't let the new Rolling Stones records out. Like nobody fucking cared. And then Ariel Smith came back, you know what I mean? And then when I remember the first time I heard Aerosmith, I was like, this is pretty cool. And they're like, oh, you got to hear this. And then unplugged. And I'm like, Where are these fucking socks? And they're from, like, 25 years ago. Holy shit. And then The Who kept going, but did they? Everything has its 20 to 30 year nostalgia trip up. That's kind of the cycle. How much they're coming out with a 90s show now. Right? And that was 30 years ago, you know what I mean? When we were in high school, we were closer to Led Zeppelin music than we are to our high school now. You know what I mean? Yeah. The 70s stuff was like I remember my mom was like, oh, we're having hippy day. This is how we used to dress. Like, this or Homecomings. This is how we used to dress. And I'm like, oh, this is so stupid. And what kind of blew my mind today? I was just kind of looking through the Led Zeppelin history, and I didn't realize in through the Outdoor came out in 79. Yeah.


Participant #1:

Shit. A year before I was born. I didn't realize it was actually what's your birthday? April. Okay, so we were both alive. John Bonham, John Lennon were still alive when we were born. I always tell my wife that I was like I was in the same partial of time as John Bonham and John Lennon. We need to move on to wrapping this up because it's after midnight here. Yeah. So before we wrap this up, please tell our Listers, if you're working on anything, if you could find you anywhere or anything you would like to pitch or talk about, you can find me at the social medias that I don't check hardly ever. I pretty much just love and sums up music rewind. That's pretty much what I go on social media for anymore. That is a good social media strategy. I approve. Yeah. I will give a shout out again to the Big Isle Brewing Company on Collier Street in Avenue in Chicago, our neighbors fantastic beer and just enjoy listening to the new records that I get to hear, or stuff I haven't heard in a while from this podcast. It's great. And maybe by the time this one airs, I will actually be on the Soundtrack Your Life podcast with my cousin Danny doing singles. And that was, I think, a guy that was on this season, Ryan Pak, does. We're hoping to record it in the next couple of weeks, so depending on when this comes out, soundtrack Your Life, check it out. It's good because especially 90 soundtracks are the best. Excellent. Well, Mike, I'd like to thank you for your time today. It was a pleasure to sit and talk with you about Led Zeppelin three. All right, man. Yeah, I get to bed. I'm with you. I get to work from home tomorrow. I'm pretty excited. The last three days I've been up at, like, 06:00. Yeah, I wouldn't be podcasting at midnight if I didn't have to work from home. Thank you for listening to Music Rewind, a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. As I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time, just not the last song. Just fuck that. Roll over. Hats off, DROY. Harper. Hats off my balls.




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