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Classic Rock Roundtable - Part 2 Transcript


The conclusion of our Classic Rock Roundtable.


We talk rock guilty pleasures, our favorite jam tunes and discuss a long list of rock legends that did not pop up in our general questions.

Panel: Stephen Epley - Host/Moderator Alan Ziegler - Episode 1; Wings-Band on the Run Doug Brinkler - Episode 3; Van Halen 1 Luke Bouris - Episode 8; Radiohead-In Rainbows


Transcript as follows Participant #1:

Hello and welcome to Music Rewind, a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host Steve Epley and in each episode I will invite a guest to tell us about their favorite favorite music album, how they discovered it and what makes it special to them. We now join the following program already in progress. We'll throw it to you then. Doug. Mine was a favorite singer and I was really a toss up on this, but I want you guys to go through and then I'll tell you mine. I went with Roy Orbison personally. That's a good one. Yeah. Running Scared and blew by. You are just perfection to me. Yeah. I was Pretty Woman. I mean that was too mainstream, but he had so many good ones. You mentioned the Willberry's earlier. I mean, I love the tracks that he's got on there. Nobody's Child, just his Heart.


Participant #1:

His 5 seconds of the song was awesome. It did. It gave me chill bumps back then, I'm thinking, because he was pretty much plucked out of obscurity and then boom. And I don't know if people realize how big he was. I mean, he was in movies and all kinds of stuff and he was the man there for a while. There's a great concert and most of it is on YouTube called the Black and White Concert where it's him and just doing all his hits. But his backing band is Elvis Costello, Bruce Springsteen, I want to say Ringo, but don't quote me on that one. But I mean, it's just like an all star backup and just him singing his head concert. The Black and White concert. Okay. I have to check that out, man. Yeah. I'm a huge fan of his and I think Van Halen did a couple of remakes of his songs. I think they did them justice and I think I had said that I do usually like the originals better than somebody redoing them. And some of those songs I think Van Halen, but I'm very prejudiced on that. I think they did justice to him. Is Van Halen your favorite man? Yeah. Good things about that. Yeah. Luke, what's your favorite singer then? See, this one was a difficult one for me. I tend to lean towards the more obscure, oddball, not a classically trained voice. I don't know. Are you looking for classically trained? Because I mean, I can take the easier on Freddie Mercury or Elton John, but for my personal taste, I like Neil Young. Neil Young, he's not considered a great voice by any means, but it's something about the feeling and the emotion and he's just got that. It works for me personally. Same with his guitar playing. It's dirty, gritty, he's got a sound. There's a future episode of the podcast not yet recorded with a musician from the UK who's going to be doing Neil Young's live. Rust. Really? Oh yeah. That's awesome. That's fantastic. Album and invoice works well with others. Crosby sells a mesh. They did their it was on this buddy that's really good. Yes, it's a unique voice. No one else sounds like rocking in the Free World is completely different than Old Man. But both of them are rocking tunes. They rock differently. Yeah, I like him, too. He just got his wife was it Daryl Hannah that played in Splash and all that? She's pregnant, I think she's 61 years old. She's pregnant. They said they did it the old fashioned way. I don't know what they mean by that. I think the emphasis on the old. Yeah, that's right. You got that right. No kidding. So, yeah, shortlist to Ray Davies, Roger Waters. You know, like I said, I don't like the I can't say I don't like I don't lean towards the classically trained. Yeah. I like the unique voices. Yeah. Who do you like? I guess that's the same I did kind of the same thing. Luke. I was thinking of a particular song and one of them for me is Mark Lannigan from Screaming Trees on Nearly Lost You. I don't know what it is about that song and his voice in that, but it gets me every time. Just gives me a chill in the back of my neck when I hear that. But I went, like overall favorite singer. I went with Susan Teddeski. I mean, that girl could sing me the phone book and I would just be like, what, do you want me to desktop? Absolutely. Yeah. What do you want me to do? I will do it. It's just one of those voices that just like, oh, I love the way she sings. I caught them at Bonneroo. They were great. Nice. Yes. That whole band is super solid. Your trucks is in the Elmond Brothers now, right. We always have a bit of a revolving door of their trucks, though. He's an amazing guitar. Absolutely. The other one I put on there was levonhelm from the band. Yeah. I've been listening to them a lot lately over the last year, few years. For some reason, I never was super into the band. And in the last few years it's just like I've been listening to them all the time, it seems like. I love the band and they're actually an answer I have later on for a question. Cool. All three of their main singers now, Robert Robertson does a sing, but the other guys, Rick Tanko and Manuel Garth. Yeah. Emmanuel. Yeah, that's it. That's cool. Rick Tanko, the harmonies that he does with the band, I mean, they're just phenomenal. I got that hillbilly again. I'm not like, musical, I guess they used to turn Robbie Roberts on his mic off. Yes. He's horrible. So he's very horrible. They turned it off, I guess. I heard rumors that he was trying to sing at Woodstock and they completely when they did, some of the went back and listened to it. They edited them out completely because it was freaking horrible. I don't know if that's true or not. I have two because I have what I would consider the old classic singer and then I would have a new as far as my favorite singer, the old classic singer was the singer for bands like Free, Bad Company, The Firm and took over for Freddie Mercury, for Queen. And that was Paul Rogers. To me, that was too easy. I thought of that. That has rock and roll, man, that guy can sing. I believe it. Yeah. It may not be totally showing that. I think he does have that perfect classic rock and roll voice. He definitely does. The modern guy, some people might not know, but Michael Sweet, who took the place of the singer for Boston when the singer passed away, but he also played with a group called Striper in the he still sang Sarah Christian Rock band. And he's like a hired gun. He's done stuff with Lynch, George Lynch and Tracy Gunn from La. Guns and the original Guns and Roses. And he's like that guy is consistently he can get really high, which you have to do to sing Boston. But this guy is older and he's like the only old singer I know that can still hit the things from when he was 20 years old. So I would look up some of his stuff as a modern striper came up in the Kiss conversation as well. Okay. Yeah, that's right. And they just replaced the bass player after all those years. The band was pretty much together for 30 years. And from playing arenas to playing Good Fellows Pizzeria in Peak in Illinois, doing acoustic versions. And that actually happened. Do you remember, Al? Now they're back out there. All right, final round of questions here. Who wants to volunteer? First run? I'll go first. So my final question is which classic rock bands do you have a complete set of records for? So their entire studio discography. We don't need to delve into the B sides and their progress. Mine is Speed Wagon, right? No, at one time I had the collection. Then later on, I kind of fell off on buying them, you know what I mean? But I had a lot of that. But mine would be very easy. Van Halen and then anything with Ozzy that includes obscure songs. The Stairway to Heaven, highway to Hell album when he did the Purple Haze remake, ozzy Sings with Miss Piggy. I mean, there's obscure things that only in Japan, that kind of stuff. But all the way from Black Sabbath till now and then, van Healing is pretty much the same thing. I looked up on the Internet and found some of the music stuff that Van Halen did, even if it was just snippets and things to include van Halen three, which we discussed. Yes, that's right. Yeah. I was the guy that bought that. I got it. Gary Sharon there, that's another good voice. He's actually got a great voice. He could have been in that earlier list. Yeah. And Extreme was a great impossible position. That boss. It was not his fault at all. No, you're absolutely right. So if we're going like vinyl, I mean, if you go MP3, I got everybody. I got it all. Yeah, that's right. For vinyl, though. Jimmy hendrix Experience. Only the three. The only full, I guess, to answer Luke's question, the completest. Not even Deep Purple. Oh, you don't have the Lakers. There's way too early. There's way too many. It's like The Stone. There's way too many there's. Some albums are like even Zeppelin. I don't have Houses of the Holy or The Coda or Presents. I've got two copies of Coda. I've got two copies of Coda. Okay. I'll marry my address. You've redeemed yourself. There you go. Now, do you have Band of Gypsies on vinyl? I do. Okay, so you got all four. Jimmy all right. See, my vinyl collection is not anywhere near. I'm a novice on that level. I have a lot more CDs than I have anything else. So my answer is an easy Pink Floyd and the Eagles. Oh, yeah, I've got them all. Several on vinyl as well. Pick and choose. But as far as CDs go, I do have all their studio albums. Endless river. Even up to the Endless River. I bought it. I'll reserve opinion. Did you buy the Roger Waters and did you buy their solo stuff later on? A couple here and there. I have the pros and cons of Hitchhiking and what's that first Gilmore album? I can't remember what it's called now, because that's what I think. Some of that stuff is good too. But like The Endless River, though, it's okay. It's almost like Shine On Your Crazy Diamond esque all of it, but without the lyrics. So to me, those good, long Pink Floyd tracks where you have those great instrumentals, they build up to where the lyrics kick in. Like, if you think of echoes, there's those long sections and then, boom, the albatross comes flying. That sort of thing. Whereas The Emeralds River doesn't have those lyrics coming in. It's just and then it goes back down. Yeah, it's great to fall asleep too. Oh, that's probably in the liner notes. Yeah, I saw a critic wrote that. Great to fall asleep too. Pink Floyd. I mean, I got all back down to Piper at the Gates of dawn, saucer Full of Secrets, umaguma, Adam Hart Mother, all those crazy early albums that my brother had, one that I didn't know. It's one where they're sitting in the diner and says, please pass the Marmalade. The marmalade, the marmalade, the Marmalade. Psychedelic breath. What are you listening to? When the other stuff came out. Yeah, but your brother smoked a lot of pot. Yeah, we won't go there. So I also have all of pink Floyd on vinyl CD. Pink Floyd is one of my all time favorites. So the regular Suspects, Beatles, Zeppelin, I've got The Police all of their albums as well. Yeah, they haven't mentioned it all. I love The Police. Thinking of rhythm sections. How come nobody else? He's one of my favorite drummers, too. He's awesome. That's it. And Dire straights. I've got all of theirs on vinyl. Alan and I were just talking about this the other day, the brothers and Arms. My vinyl copy sounds horrible. And Al said that Mark Knoffler wanted to record the latest and greatest technology, which was digital at the time. So is that a reason why the vinyl doesn't sound as good? Most likely the MP3. That's possible. And then also, I don't know if you guys are going to give me credit for this, but Derek and the Dominoes,


Participant #1:

what about the live album? Do you have that? I do not. Okay. Another fun fact. Did you know Derek and the Dominoes were the band that played with George Harrison on All Things Must Pass? Did and contribute to some of the behind the scenes wife issues of yes and the Delaney and Bonnie albums as well? Derek and Domino's and obviously Dwayne Alman influenced that album tremendously.


Participant #1:

I'm very close to Van Morrison. My dad was a die hard, but if you look at Van Morrison's discography, it is exhausting. I think I'm just missing the last few that come out. He still every year I was going to ask you, so you even still have the later ones. When my dad passed in 2011, I made it a point to go out and get every Van Morrison album. I have fallen off on the last couple, but it's because he really is he's still just cranking them out. Two albums a year sometimes. It's nuts. I had no idea. Well, same with Neil Young. Neil Young is still cranking him out, too. Does Neil Young still own Lionel Trains? I know at one time he had bought Lionel Trains out because he had a handicapped son and they liked playing with Trains, so he had enough money to buy. They were going to close up Lionel Train, so I don't know if he still owns or not. Okay, who's up for next? What you got, doug, for your last question, mine was your favorite jam. I have two things, like a favorite song and then an actual jam session. I'll go ahead and I'll tell you. That probably my favorite song. That like if I want to walk into a wedding party or something, they want to intro me or whatever would be crazy. Train, Ozzy. It was kind of the story of my life, you know what I mean? But as far as my favorite jam, if I'm sitting there just wanting to listen to some guys jam out, that would be the Outlaws, Green Grass and Hide Tides. That's a good answer. I really like that. Just a jamming. That's a great track. That's a track I had never heard of until Guitar Hero. Oh, wow. Yeah. I will openly admit, yes, I played a lot of Guitar Hero. It was a fun game. But trying to play that song,


Participant #1:

I couldn't have put it in my long favorite monster. It was really close. But yeah, as far as the jam, I like it. They've got a good version of Ghost Riders on the sky, too. Yes, that's another good I wasn't sure what you're going for with this question, so I actually have two answers as well. My first is as far as a jam session, which is kind of a cheat, but it's Cortez the Killer. It's from a live thing with Grace Potter and Joe Satriani from an award show called The Jammies. And there's also a trumpet player who's famous, but I forget his name, but that song is phenomenal. And just Grace Potter, if you're not familiar, she's another great vocalist. I've seen her a couple of times and she's really good. And then towards the end, everybody else kind of trails off and Joe Satriani just takes the last three minutes himself. Yeah, he's awesome. And then my other one was Get Ready by Rare Earth. The 23 minutes version. It's quite long, but I love listening to it because you've got some really amazing drum solos in the middle and some others, but I don't know if it was recorded live or not. There's like some conspiracies that they piped in the crowd noise playing live. Yeah, it starts out a good minute and a half, two minutes of just kind of organ with a little bit of drums. And then eventually, because I think they were on the Motown label themselves, where Earth was, but then eventually it starts with that changes to and then the Crowd. It's really a good gym session. That's 23 minutes long for that one. Yeah, it's great. So I didn't know I thought you were going for, like, jam, like a rocking tune. So basically anything off Sound Garden is a bad motor finger again. And then I just put the title track from Smoke. I always listen to that thing. I don't know, something about that song just gets me moving and ready to do stuff. I got one that people might want to look up and it's a group that Al probably knows and that's Hanky Toast and they had Shaking and a Bacon. And that is a jamming tune. And I actually like the CD, but they probably didn't sell very many. But I come into work one time and my boss is like, Why are you so happy? I said, I just love this song. And I was out working in the hot sun and I was jamming to that tune. And when I told him the words to some of the songs, they're like, Okay, but it's a jamming tune. It makes me happy. But that was just something that popped in my head when I was talking about the other there. So it's hard to pick a favorite, but that's a good jam. Yeah, for sure. No, I struggled with this one, too, so I have two answers. I actually textile and I said, does he mean jam band or does he mean your favorite song? Originally taught jam band, so I'm thinking Grateful Dead, Fish, that type of thing. So when I thought that, I set out Almond Brothers Jessica. Yes. That's what I think of when I think of a jam band.


Participant #1:

But personally, and I'm going to sound like a broken record here the Punk and The Godfather by The Who off of Quadrophenia. That song is just perfection. When I think of bass guitar, John At Whistler's Tone, that's the song I go to. Pete and John are having a conversation with their instruments in the song. It's just like almost a war at the beginning. They're going just back and forth. There's something about that. And obviously, Keith Moon, he's just an animal on that one, too. So if we're talking jam and song, al said, think of a song that gets you riled up. That's the one. You're exhausted at the end of it. That song just does it for me. It's a good one. My first thought was jamband as well. And my favorite jam band is outside of classic rock, which is Oar. If you ever listen to them. I love it when a band can take a two minute, three or three minute song on their album and turn it into ten minutes live. I love seeing that. Right. I've seen OER in concert as well. It used to be big into Dave Matthews, OER, that kind of stuff. I'll take the next one. What's a classic rock guilty pleasure of yours? Something that's kind of universally panned. But you enjoy it. Okay. Because I never understood the guilty pleasure thing. To me, if you like it, I don't feel guilty about it.


Participant #1:

I think that's why he tacked on Universally Panned. You appreciate it yourself, but I'll go with okay. So what I thought of was the album, the Big Price from Honeymoon Suite. Anyone remember Honeymoon? Yeah, I do remember seeing my Fair Estate fair. But they were popular there for a little bit. They opened up for, I think, like, Heart or somebody did. Yeah, I still listen to that every once in a while. Yeah, that's a good one. There's a lot of those groups that you don't hear from, but that was good. I like it. The album after that, I think it's called, like, Racing After Midnight or something like that. I like that one, too. And then, poof, they're gone. I don't know. Yeah, I heard something about like the guitar player got in a car wreck or something and heard his hand or something. And then there's a big lull. I don't know, it was something like that. A long time ago, obviously, but that'd be mine. Honeymoon suite, so look them up. Yeah, look them up, do yourself a favor and I think that's a good one so I struggled with this one as well I don't really have anything that I'm ashamed of but universally pinned,


Participant #1:

it was five. Let's give them a break. That album sold by Paddy's, that song was huge


Participant #1:

I dig Ringo Beetle tracks, I don't skip over them ever. With a little help from my friends don't Pass Me By, Octopus's Garden, what Goes On is an amazing song so that was the best I could think of I know Ringo is usually not considered the greatest Beatle of all time, but straightforward rock too. He's got new stuff too and he gets all these superhero guys to come in and play with them they're just friends and they want to jam with them there you go. No, that's a good thing. I like that answer, that was the best I could think of and no downplaying ringo, he's an all star, he's one of the great I think he's the highest paid for that too if you want him to play on the album, he's the most expensive drummer there you go, I'll build off that and it's a bit of a cheat because it's not really an album, but there's a movie Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band with DJs and Peter Frampton,


Participant #1:

you're the only person that liked it I do like the album way back in the day, To Take All, it was a massive attempt to put all these Beatles songs into some sort of cohesive story and it's just so damn entertaining I can't remember it now, but you got so much crazy shit going on, you got robots singing, you've got Aaron Smith as the villain at the end, the weather vein turns into Billy Preston there's definitely a lot of cocaine is a hell of a drug, you know what I mean? They made it as coherently as they could, they weren't all functioning on that but it's a classic rock as you can get with who they've got in there and what they tried to do and I enjoy it, but nobody else does. You know what, I can see that that's definitely the definition of a guilty pleasure there you go, for my guilty pleasure, I was telling you when we were talking about Weird Al, I went and saw two of his concerts and they were excellent concerts, you didn't have to worry about any fighting or anything like that but I'm going to have to go and that is the Ramones because they got panned by the critics and I really like the Ramones and then another group that musically they suck, but I love their attitude growing up and that's the Sex Pistols and I throw those songs in and a lot of the stuff didn't make it to the radio for obvious reasons, but I like that I guess the Sex Pistols album would be kind of like Appetite For Destruction before Guns and Roses because it was pretty much attitude. Yeah, all attitude. And it might not sell records and it definitely had them banned almost everywhere. They were really in trouble with their government. I've tried to listen to the Sex Pistols. I mean, not necessarily Guilty Pleasure, just like the Ramos. Over time, they've gotten their due. They've been deemed very influential, them and The Clash and others. But I've tried to listen to Sex Pistols. It doesn't resonate with me. I can't get to it. Yeah, musically, they suck. It was the attitude. I mean, Sid Vicious didn't even know how to play the bass, but he could cut himself with a glass bottle and it sold albums. But it's just attitude. But the Ramones and the Sex Pills at the time were kind of the head of the schedule, the only head of the punk scene. The only other group that I think predated them was the band called Death. That was the three African American brothers that sat there and jammed out in their bedroom. And if you haven't heard of them, it's a band called Death. They, I think, were the originators of punk rock. And then it went to I think they were out of Michigan. I think it was Detroit, Michigan. Their dad was a preacher. The people would be walking past their house and it was just so obnoxiously loud, and they said, what are you guys playing? Because it wasn't what they were used to. It definitely wasn't Motown. And one of their songs is basically people knocking on the door, telling them to turn it down or what's going on in there, and they made a song out of it. But there was a death, the singer died and the two brothers, they still go out every once in a while, so documentary on them and they still go out every once a while. But it's a band that a lot of people didn't know about. But I think if it wasn't for them, we wouldn't have Ramones or Sex Pistols or even any of the punk bands that, like it or not, they have pretty much I mean, it was a short live thing. It was like disco where it was a short live thing. What I learned recently in my bits of research for upcoming Animals episode is that apparently there's like a one sided rivalry between Sex Pistols and Pink Floyd where Seditious even had a I Hate Pink Floyd's shirt and he was photographed with it and worn in concerts. Yeah, it said Pink Floyd and then he wrote, in Black Sharpie, I Hate on top. Roger Waters was asked about it. His answer was kind of like, who. Yeah. To be fair, I think the Sex Pistols other bands had problems with them because even Queen Freddie Mercury was going to get into it with Sid Vicious. But Sid Vicious actually backed down


Participant #1:

and they were totally anti music establishment. And you have the six Pistols. I think that was part of the stick to sell albums and stuff. They pissed off the Queen. They pissed off everybody. They couldn't stay in hotels. The record albums would pick them up and drop them right away. They didn't want their albums made. They would give them some money and buy the things and somebody would buy them out. And it was just amazing that they got an album out. Yeah. So who's the singer? Sid Vicious or Johnny Rotten? Johnny Rotten and Johnny Vicious. He was the bass player. Okay. Yeah. He was the second base player, the first player, first place player got out. But he's still alive and him and the guitar and drummer are doing a documentary. But is it Glenn Matlock? Was that it is Glenn, but I can't remember Matlock. I think he was definitely you can't tell him he's not a phenomenal guitar player. He was a guitar player. No, none of them were excellent or probably beyond high school band capabilities, but it was the attitude. It was all attitude at a certain place in a certain time. Yes. Things were really downtrodden in England and there was no future. And so they wrote a song about it and played it, and they're doing a documentary and Johnny Rotten wasn't even asked to be in it then. He was going to sue the company, the rest of the bandmates, and they own the rights to his name and everything. So he wasn't invited into it, and he can't make a rebuttal. A lot of bands did that. They sold all their rights to everything because they needed money when they were broke. Actually, Bruce Springsteen just sold his for 500 million and Miley Crue got 150,000,000 for their catalog. And you hear my heart I don't think he ever will. There was the whole Paul McCartney in Michael Jackson battle for a while. Oh, yeah, because Michael Jackson bought the Beatles catalog. Because Paul McCartney told him that this is how he was making money. Because Paul McCartney was buying all the artists material. And so Michael and his Wisdom sat there and bought all the Beatles stuff. So he kind of stabbed them in the back. I think he may have bought them back after Michael Jackson died. I think so, too. Can you imagine how much that'll be worth? I mean, if Springsteen gets $500 oh, my God, I don't even know. I couldn't even put a number on it. A billion. I mean, think about it. You're not too far off. Yeah, it's crazy. Well, Alan, go ahead and take us into your last question. My last question is, if you could go back in time to see a concert, who and when or what would it be? There is a correct answer to this question as well. I agree. That would be The Who Live at Leads, February 1970. Not aisle white. Steve, you'll appreciate this, Tommy, and full at that concert. Now, the vinyl record that they sold back in the day, they cut out Tommy and gave you the rest of the songs, but they did indeed play from start to finish. Tommy. I think that would be just the DVD of them doing Tommy. And I wonder if it's that. I don't know. Has the skeleton out. He wore that a lot, though. He wasn't the original. Yeah, that wasn't just one concert. He wore that quite often. And they do a great version of a quick one while he's away at that concert as well, which is one of my favorite who songs. Again, sound like a broken record. I think you can tell who my favorite classic rock band is. Well, that's a good thing. Yeah. To go back in time, man, there's so many things. But I have two things because I didn't know if I go back in time to ban the name of the band to see them or a festival. And for me, the festival would be the US festival in 19 years. Because you had Judas Priest, Motley crew, $1 million to do their set at the end. That was the big thing. That was the concert you mentioned in your show. Yeah. And if you listen so you want to go on ahead of Van Halen. Exactly,


Participant #1:

yes. The best recording of anything they ever did. And I think it was just like everybody was playing very well at that time and I don't know if they were. I think there's a documentary about that on, like, HBO Max or something to US Festival. I'd have to look that up. But that would be if I wanted to see one concert, but if I wanted to go back in time and see because of the death of Lemme, would be Motorhead. I've never seen Motorhead live and I would have loved to see Motorhead. Probably my ears would still be ringing, but it would be awesome to see them live. That would be good. Yeah, that'd be great. My take on this answer is The Last Waltz by the Band, november 25. Awesome choice. I can do that, too. It's a concert I watch often. Listen to it often. I mean, just the band playing all of their hits. But the guest lineup just nails it with you got Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Doctor John Van Morrison, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, the list goes on. And it's just I would have loved to have been in the show with that one. That version of The Night the Drove Old Dixie Down gets me every time with the horn section in there and everything. And it's just like the drumroll when it comes in, it's like, Oh, man. It's like they're just a little bit behind the beat and it's just so killer. That version. I love that version version. It sounds like that thing would be bigger than Woodstock. He wouldn't have the piss and the massive wheel. There's a great moment further on up the road where Aircraft is playing and starts out and Aircraft has got this intro solo that's phenomenal. But then he breaks a string and he yells out, Robbie. And he turns around and Robbie Robinson just with a guitar that's completely differently tuned but just cuts right into the same solo and he continues on while clapping, gets a new guitar and seamless. Yeah, it's just phenomenal. And you know, for years that the Neil Young part where they had to go in and digitally erased the Coke Valley. There was like a white boulder in his nose and you can see it hanging there.


Participant #1:

I went a little bit more personal, I guess. Mine was Guns and Roses opening for the Colt September 4 because I could have went and nobody wanted to go with and I didn't want to go by myself.


Participant #1:

San Diego State University opened. This was Guns and Roses opening for the Colt. Yeah, the Cold is awesome. The Cold has a lot of hits. Yeah. Yeah. They were torn on electric on the electric


Participant #1:

and rain and they just had a lot of songs. I would have went with you, but I was busy in second grade. Yeah, the Cool Uncle would have took me out of school and flew to San Diego. Yeah. I got to say, I did almost change my answer after our previous conversations, though. To be able to sit in that early tour where you had, like Doug was saying, elvis Presley, Jerry Lee, Lewis Orbison, Johnny Cash. Yeah. During that particular prepackaged type tours that they used to have, caravan stars, they come into your town and you hide your women, they do like a 20 minutes best, upset each one of them and then go off and do their drugs and drinks. That's what I was going to say. And blow their shit up by dynamite at the hardware store. And they were famous for going out and buying dynamite and throwing out windows and blowing shit up. So Johnny Cash got arrested for that one time and he just had to spend the night. But they were just having fun, drinking too much and people want to ruin your bun. Yeah. Never happens. One thing I almost picked also was the Freddie Mercury tribute concert from 1992. Oh, yeah, that was good. That was really good. You had Metallica in there and Guns and Roses doing their own personal songs. But then you had all these other great artists singing queen tunes. Roger Daltry, Robert Plants, George Michael, Elton John. So many I can remember even the first Farm Aid where Sammy Hagar and Eddie Van Halen came out. But they had Melon Camp and Willie Nelson and things like that. It was just a really good thing. I could have went to that too, but I got in trouble like the week before because I was out drinking and then my parents update around me and would not let me go to that. And I still bring that up every once in a while. And they should still the first Farm Aid. I could have went to the first Farm Aid. Yeah. That's awesome. It wasn't my fault that I was next. I'll give her a crap about that. Yeah. Oh, well, live and learn. I like to say I learned a lesson from that, but I didn't back at it the next week. You're a trooper. Twice as hard just to piss them off. That's right. If we want to, we can go into that extra question we didn't get to. What's your favorite live album? That's cool. I'll go, yeah, go ahead on that. So mine was in I think it was 6th grade. There's a buddy of mine, Larry Medaris was the name. He brings this album in, he's like, I don't really like this. You want to listen to it? And of course, I'll listen to anything once, right. So it gives it to me and it's Queen Live Killers. And that launched me on my whole queen loving path. Yeah. And then I went back and then I listened to News of the World, which was that Steve was at your dad's house all the time. I would listen to it all the time. Every time I go over there and I was over there a lot of scratches on that vinyl. Yeah, it's right over there. Love that song. The song, it's late. It's one of my favorite songs. It's like the next to last song on the side, too. Love that song. To this day. Still play it all the time. And so, yes, that album, it was a freebie, complete freebie, which is the best kind. He just like, I don't really like it. Okay. Checked it out. Loved it. Loved it. Played the shit out of that thing. Cool. I don't have the exact copy because I go through stages where I sell my vinyl back and then I end up buying it all back again. Blah, blah, blah. But I have a copy. Not that original copy, but cool. So that's mine. So this may go back to our original question. I don't know if he's really considered classic rock, but we've been talking about him quite a bit, so van Morrison, it's too late to stop now. Okay. He sounds just as good as the studio albums on this live album. It's crisp, clean. He's one of those guys that if the crowd cheers in the middle of a song, he'll say thank you in the middle of a verse or chorus. So I thought that was pretty neat too. But I went to see him in 2009 with my dad at the Chicago Theater and he opened with Wild Night, which is one of my favorites from him. Honey. So the best part of the concert, so he's in the middle of a song and he drops the microphone and walks off the stage. And that was the end of the concert. The band finished the song, they played it out, but when band was done, he was done actually


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rock and roll. So I don't care if he's considered classic rock or not. Have you heard a version of Caravan from The Last Waltz? I have not. You're familiar with the song Caravan, right? Yeah, absolutely. I've seen the last vaults. I've heard it that version first from The Last Vault, which is one of my favorite tracks on that entire album. There's so much energy, the way he does it. And he gets the band kicking in the background and then you hear the studio version and wow, this is completely different. It's a whole different different songs. Bands are like that. Yeah. So that would be your favorite live album then? The Last Waltz? It could be, but I keep leaning back towards Eagles Live. Really? Sorry, man. My dad had Eagles Live on cassette. I would mow my lawn on right. Lawnmower below a walkman, and I would listen to Eagles Live over and over again. It's the one with the roadcase, the red Roadcase, right? Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Got the embossed, like the edges. You can feel it or raised. It's kind of just what most live albums are greatest hits. So a lot of their deeper tracks, that's where I heard them first, like Dul and Dalton and others and Super Good. That's all from that Eagles live album. It's easily a favorite. I've got two. One is the quality of the live sound is not that good, but it's still popular. And the other one I like the sound quality of. But Cheap Trick Live at Boudicon was the one that I listened to. And I would watch my brother and sister and in the summer, Mum and dad would have me watch them and I would just jam that out, you know what I mean? So Live at Food Con was one of my favorites. But as far as clarity and stuff, I've got worse. I got an Anthrax album, Bring On the Noise. And they should have not brought it out. I think a radio station or something that I think they literally had two microphones and you can't understand anything. And so that was definitely out. Not that I don't listen to it, but you can't listen to it loud because the speakers distort so bad. So you're just like an Anthrax is not easy listening music, you know what I mean? But the live album that I like, that the sound quality. Besides the reverb on the guitar, but it's very clear, would be Ted Nugent's Double Life. Gonzo. Ted Nugent is a phenomenal guitar player and he kind of did the Hendrix thing with the feedback and all that stuff. Well, he was friends with Jimi Hendrix, you got to remember. Oh, yeah. A lot of those guys. Like, he says he never does drugs or alcohol because all his friends are dead. But that Double Wife gonzo where he would talk in between and things like that. And it wasn't political spill then, but it was fun loving. Get the crowd going and the crowd's chairing and everything. But Stranglehold Live, that's about a nine minute song that could have been along with two song, doesn't get enough credit. It's phenomenal. You see it in concert and it's one guy playing an instrument that sounds like a whole thing. And Ted Nugent had so many songs, everybody knows them from Cat Scratch Fever. Well, that song is lame, you know what I mean? For one of the giant sweepoon tanks, that's one of the greatest love songs I've ever made. But I think that Double Life gonzo as far as quality of the recording and everything. You'll hear the fireworks and stuff go off. Not like the fake Kiss stuff, but the clarity of instruments. Even though his guitar is guaranteed to blow the balls over charging rhino at 50 paces, I think is what he says. And his guitar play refuses to play. Sweet shit. And if people want to get mello, they can just get the F out of the auditorium because he was there to rock your socks off. And I believe that as far as a live album, I think that one's with clarity. I'll have to listen to the Van Morrison. I don't think the piano gets distorted, but Ted News really played onto that. Remember when VH one had, like, pop up video? Oh, yeah. I saw once where they were doing the Dan Yankees high enough. Oh, yeah. Good 80s balladies. I don't know when they came out with the Dan Yankees, but Ted Dugan was doing his own thing on the set. Yeah. So he had the guy from Sticks I can't remember his name. Tommy Shaw. No, Tommy Shaw. Tommy Shawshaw. He was the lead singer, so he's all serious in the video. And then there'll be a little pop up in an arrow saying, incoming. Ted. Ted Nugent will crash the stage, play a couple of licks, and he'll leave the stage. And while Tommy Shaw is still trying to play in series and it went through a whole video doing that, that's the way I saw him in concert. They opened up for Bad Company and Howie was it, Hoey was playing, Douglas singing.


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He just passed away about six months ago. But it was the Holy Water Tour, I think. Yeah, that was a Civic Center. I saw that. Well, this one was in or was it the Bloomington? This one was in Bloomington. Yeah, Bloomington. And I'll tell you what it was when we were first going into Iraq, and Ted Nugent, I never seen an American flag that big. It was the whole stage. I mean, it was just huge. And everybody was cheering and he was calling, son was saying, a little piss ant. And basically he busted out with Stranglehold and it was just awesome. And then, like you said, the other guys who were rockers played more serious. And he's running around and he lays on the stage, he's doing a solo, and it's like he leaned too far back, fell on his back. He just kept on jamming and the guitar player and everybody grabs legs and grabs behind, and he's sitting there jamming. They walk him behind the curtain and you could just hear him just wailing the shit out of his guitar. And then he comes running back out on stage and they're trying to chase him down, and he's just well, he's the Motor City Madman. He used to fly in wearing a loin cloth and just go, Bambastic. His concerts were really good. I've seen him a few times, and sad to say, I saw him at a state fair when there was only a couple of guys, and then I seen them well, at Puria, there was a lot of people at one of the bike rallies and they actually brought the singer from Adam. Boy Dukes actually came in and he passed away, I think, last year. So all these classic guys are bought the end of their run. But Ted Nugent is still out there playing probably 70, 80 shows a year. Really? Yeah, I know that. Yeah. He takes a lot of time off to hunt and that's what he's got enough money. He doesn't have to worry about it. All right. Get through all the questions. Yeah. The Beach Boy is not mentioned once, or The Monkeys are. The Doors. Oh, my God. No Beach Boys. No Doors out there. Mike Nesmith just passed away. Yeah, that's right. The Kings. Huge. Yes. You mentioned The Kings. You said Ray Davis. Yeah, you're right. Jethro Tall. How about Jethro Toll? Rock and Flute? I don't know Dan well. That's one of those bands that I didn't like at the time because I thought they were way too slick. But now I listen to them quite a bit. I got the Double live album is still one of my favorites. Did you mention After The Beach Boys? Because I like The Beach Boys, too. But we didn't mention The Beach Boys. We didn't mention The Monkeys. The Doors. Oh, The Doors. This is the end. I was thinking of doing that as my favorite long song. This idea was a good time. I had that on my list, too. Yeah, that was too easy. When The Doors were on, they were great. But there are some songs that are kind of unlistenable at times. Yeah, well, you have to be stoned, you know what I mean? It's just one of those they were when they come up, this sounds great, and then the next day they're like, what the hell? They can't all be winners. Yeah. And I did get to see The Beach Boys at Bonneroo, which was real nice. That was awesome. It was largely the remaining beach Boys members and a fantastic backup band. But still, just to be able to see Brian Wilson singing God Only Knows wonderful. And I would say they were classic. I don't know blues, but I definitely that sounds is a fantastic album. It's not for everybody, but it's still a great album. I heard Charles Manson loved it,


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but yeah. Who else did we not mention as far as classic rock staples? I'm trying to think of David Bowie. Yeah. Several people have said that Ziggy stardos is like, almost they brought it in. But that's a deep one to talk about. And they may not have the knowledge to back it up. It's a great album, but there's always another album that they had more knowledge of. Velvet Underground. Oh, yeah. Velvet Underground. Sex Pistol type. Yeah, that's exactly what sonic Youth and all those I don't know if they're classic, because I really don't know. My guilty pleasure was the Ramones and the Sex Pistols, but I don't put them as classic rock, really. Ramones did have Take Over the Airwaves and they had a couple of songs. If they slowed down, they can do it. But they were just but then again, they did bring something to the table that might stand the test of time as far as, like, bits, cleed, BOP. It was on a kids cartoon. And there are some things I'm going when Led Zeppelin is selling Cadillac station wagons and they played what was it? The hellian? Judas Priest. The hellion to sell Chrysler minivans. Welcome to the Jungle. They're selling Nissan now. Yeah. Welcome to some of these things. Those guys, when they were thinking of it, weren't thinking that they were going to be selling laundry soap and things like the money for it, though. Hell yeah. And I'd be right there with them. Do you want to sell? Yes, I do. How much? How much do you guys put Billy Joel in the classic rock era? I do. I would like glass houses and strangers, I would say. Yeah, man. Innocent man. Yeah. ELO is another one we didn't mention. Yeah, that's a good one.


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That's another traveling Willbury. Yeah. Jeff Lynn was on all of Petty's solo albums. Right. He's a producer and collaborator, often with Tom Petty. Okay. Yeah, I was going to say because I always found that odd, tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. Tom Petty would do a solo album, but all the Heartbreakers are on it, plus Jeff Lynn, so that makes it a solo album. I guess that confused me. Some people can even say that full Moon Fever was like Willbury's volume two ish but it was more obviously Petty on the front. That's probably my favorite album from him. We didn't really mention, like, groups like Deep Purple. Yeah, I think they were huge. And Carlos Santana. Oh, Santana. Yeah. That's our plan. That's definitely classics, man. This list. Like I said, we could talk forever. And it took a lot just to try to narrow down something. Even if I said, you know what, I got to put down two or three because I cannot narrow it. We have multiple answers for many of these questions on the live album, too. I didn't want to be a one hit thing, but Ozzy's tribute to Randy Rhodes is a great album with the drum solos and everything like that, and I really enjoyed that. The quality of the taping I don't think was as good as I don't know where I got it, but I've got a version of Mr. Crawley with Randy Rhodes playing live, and it's one of those solos. There's two solos in the song, but they're very emotional because he just keeps going it's off. That live album. Is it? Greg Settriani was a student of Randy Rhodes. Randy Rhodes was a classical music guitar player, and he was a teacher of satriani crash that got Randy roads. Yeah, his plane crashed into the tour bus. He was touring with Ozzy. Well, he was Ozzy's guitar player, and they were messing around and jacking around with the private. They were trying to do one of the wing dips. Yeah, wing dips. And it clipped the top of the tour bus. Oh, really? Yeah, and it killed them. In history, you've had rock stars that died in plane crashes or bus crashes, but this one was double whammy, and it was right in front of Ozzy. And Sharon, one of Sharon's best friends, was on tour with them and used to help her out with paperwork. She was on the plane, too. And that was another shame, because Randy Rhodes had so much more guitar playing to go. He came up with, like, over the Mountain in one night. He told Ozzy not to go out because Ozzy was constantly getting in trouble with the alcohol and drugs and stuff. And he says, Hey, why don't you stay here and we'll beat out a song? We'll come out with a song. And they did it in one night. And he kept Ozzy from getting in trouble. Pissing at the Alamo or whatever. Ozzy would walk around the line of ants. Yeah, he'd walk around in a dress wearing a German helmet. You know what I mean? He was way out of his mind. But they could come out with a good song like that in the night. It doesn't happen. Lightning in the bottle. And that guy come up with all kinds of cool rips and stuff. And it was a shame that he was gone too soon. Do we miss anybody? Any more big names for you? Oh, man, we could talk forever, dude. Elvis. I mean, Elvis. Chuck Perry. Tell us about the scarf. I've got it right here. Oh, look, you got right there. Ready? Pull it out. I'm selling it. Dude, that is awesome. My aunt was in the front row at the 1976 Champagne, Illinois concert. Wow. And he handed it to her. You can see his makeup. Apparently he wiped it on his face. There makeup stains on it. I have a scarf. It's Brute 1500 right now. But if we can find a picture of my aunt in the crowd apparently there's a book about Champagne Illinois, about the concert itself, just the Champagne Illinois concert. And if there's a photo from the stage looking down, he said if we can point my aunt out, he can get quite a bit more than that. Oh, that's awesome. The guy that's going to do the Kiss episode, he started out in his entertainment career doing some Elvis impersonations. Oh, yeah, nice. Yeah, he's a musician, actor, director now, but he was young. Not to be nitpicky, but is Elvis classic rock or is he golden oldies? Well, I think he's oldies, but I would say classic. He's one that bleeds the other way up to 68. He was classic after that. He was it the 68 or the 69? The comeback 68 comeback special. That was awesome. I go classic rock up till then. Afternoon. Definitely doing the blues. That's the thing. Sure, Andy, definitely. I think it stands the test of time when the karate kicks and the jumpsuits come on. If Elvis counts, then Bob Dylan is a huge one. Though we miss traveling. Will Bear. We talked about I mentioned him for the last vault. You did? Okay. But I could talk about Bob billing for days. I left him off potentially because I thought folk music might not make it to the classic rock. Oh, no. I'll put the classic Rocky. Hey, Al, what's the best lyrics in rock and roll that Bob Dylan sings don't work because the panels took the handles. Yeah, exactly. What if the letdown concerts of like we've got our legends list and try to see as many legends as you can. And we got to see Bob Dylan here in Atlanta several years ago and it wasn't great. Yeah, he had just released a new album and I've never kind of mumbled for an hour and a half, 2 hours. It got to me that's what he was doing was mumbling a lot and there was a comedian that was making fun of his mumbling and he did an impression and it was spot on. I thought, oh man, how sad. Because you can see throughout the crowd, everyone's sitting and everyone was just like this. And you could see the glow of their phones. No one was into it at all. You had people yelling, you'll play Maggie's Farm. I bet he loved that. Probably one of the most covered artists in history. He's got to be up there. If it ain't I mean, everybody has done his songs. I was going to say he'd be one of the guys that could sell his property for some money. He did a billion, for sure. A couple of months later we saw Paul McCartney and Paul McCartney. I got winded just watching him. He's up and down the stage. He's having a grand old time. That's amazing. All the great old Beatles tunes and his solar ones, and he's just like a 25 year old kid out there. Mick Jagger, I heard, is still. A friend of mine sent some videos of a concert, I think it was in St. Louis just about a month ago or so, and he was out running around and stuff. Stretchy pants don't look good. I would pay the money to see Paul McCartney again. I probably would not fork out the money to be able to afford Rolling Stones tickets, though. Well, I can't even imagine what they cost now. Al and I were just looking up judas tickets were definitely up there. What was the Judas Priest concert? 300 something dollars. Oh, yeah. So Judas Priest has come to the Puria Theater, which would be an awesome place to see them. Yeah, the balcony ticket was 300 and some dollars. Eddie Veteran is playing in Chicago, saying, the $300, no, that was like the cheapest one. They're going to price themselves out. I can remember when I got the only ticket. I would pay $140 to see Van Halen on their last tour with David Lee Rock, but


Participant #1:

way a lot of money for when I was dating Michelle, trying to impress her. Sure, I had floor seats for Roger Waters when he did The Wall, and it's entirely which was phenomenal. But I mean, I kind of wrote checks I didn't have money for at the time, but it was worth it. But then recently we saw Elton John and St. Marina way high up and just about the same price. I'll tell you what, Elton John tickets were crazy expensive. In 2003, I went to Milwaukee for the Harley Davidson's 100th anniversary and there was going to be a big name concert. So we get there and tickets were not bad because they were really trying to support all the bikers being there and food was good and everything. And we're thinking, all right, man, who's this going to be? An American band? It's got to be Aerosmith. It's got to be maybe Bon Jovi. We don't know who it is. They dropped the curtain and it's Elton John. And I'd say probably three, four of the bikers. We all sat there and go, this is bullshit, man. A dude from England, you know what I mean? And we actually walked out. Now I wish I kind of stick out. You put on a hell of a show. Yeah, I could imagine. It had all the flash and everything, but I was just like I don't know, it just was like a letdown. He was at Puria, too. He played not too long ago at Period. My dad saw him at the United Center last year. Yeah, I think he was in the auditorium or whatever there. My dad keeps sending me selfies from these concerts he's going to in Chicago. He's like, Yeah, I'm at Elton John. Hey, I'm at Jackson Brown. I'm at James Hill. I know he's going to all of them. I was going to say we didn't even like the Big Bopper and some of those other guys that were popular in the 50s, that's golden oldies. I think 50 to 60 is golden oldie. That's what I would classify. You mentioned Chuck Barry earlier. I put him in the early rock,


Participant #1:

Little Richard. He was one of the big founders of rock and roll. Chuck Berry, he was still playing up until he was old and passed away. But he would go, I want $10,000 in a briefcase, $10,000 cash. They'd get some local people that will learn his songs and he'd get up there, do his deal, give his money, hop back in the car and gone. Thing of older Chuck Berry. You guys need to look us up when we're done here, go to YouTube and type in Chuck Berry, john Lennon. So they played a few songs together, and Yoko was there. She gets up to the microphone in the middle of one of the songs and just starts going and Chuck Berry, he jumps. He's scared. When she said he's like, what in the hell did this girl just new? It's not exactly like Chuck Barry, but I was at Rock 106, used to have Hog Rose every year and they'd have different bands come in. So I was there. I saw Cheap Trick was the main act. I see Cheap Trick roll up in a limo. They get out, they do 45 minutes. They get in a limo, boom, they're gone. It's just like Chuck Barry, but it's with their own musicians. I mean, it was literally they roll up in the limo, they pop out, they do 45 minutes, boom. Back to Rick Nelson, guitar pick from that guy.


Participant #1:

I have it in my wallet. Gumballs or whatever. Who's the lead singer? Cheap Trick? Xander robin Zander. His daughter has a band. I can't remember the name of it, but I got to see them play at the 9th Street Pub in the Peru or the south when the two like right there on the border. I think I've seen Cheap Trick five times, but she's married to some his daughter's married to somebody famous. This would have been early 2000s when I saw them. They did a kickass version of Hey Bulldog. That's what I remember from that show. That was a really good version of that. Okay, that's cool. Rick Nielsen recently caught you as a guest on the Foo Fighters Sonic Highways album. Yes, we talked about that in the radio episode as well. That album, like you said, it's very underrated. I actually ended that vinyl. I didn't realize I had it. I was looking through with this podcast I went through and let me see what I got. And I didn't even remember buying that. I do, too. We should probably close this out though. Yeah. It's 1130 your time, right? Yeah. All right, well, go to bed. It's almost midnight. Before we wrap this up, I'd like to steal the pitch moment and turn it around to myself. You can support Music Rewind by joining our patreon. Patrons have the ability to access all the future episodes long before they are publicly available. So up there right now, as we record this, you've got our Metallica episode, the Radiohead episode, the Kiss episode, and soon will be the Sunny Day Real Estate episode. And as we move into season two, I'll be putting more finished episodes on there. I'm getting more people lined up. It's going to be a good transfer, and we've got more roundtables on the horizon. Also, please take a moment to give us a rating or review on Apple podcast, spotify podcast or good pods anywhere that you do your listening. And lastly, please check out our sister podcast, Cinema Decon. On that show, I joined my friend Aaron Hart to overthink and deconstruct the great classic movies of the, which is also available wherever you listen. Well, gentlemen, thank you. It has been a lot of fun talking all things classic rock with you, and I appreciate you doing this. I appreciate you having a lot of fun. It's a good idea. And nice seeing you all. I did. Good to see everybody. Yeah, great to see everybody.


Thank you again for listening to Music Rewind. And as I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time,


Participant #1:

a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. Back to you. Anchors.



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