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Classic Rock Roundtable - Part 1 Transcript

Updated: Jun 28, 2022

Music Rewind welcomes three previous guests to participate in a Classic Rock Roundtable. This will be the first in many roundtable bonus episodes in the future. Our guests bring questions on the topic to the table and our panel of self-proclaimed experts discuss and have fun with the conversation. This panel kicks off with a key question: “What is considered Classic Rock?”

Panel: Stephen Epley - Host/Moderator Alan Ziegler - Episode 1; Wings-Band on the Run Doug Brinkler - Episode 3; Van Halen 1 Luke Bouris - Episode 8; Radiohead-In Rainbows


Transcript as follows: Participant #1:

Hello and welcome to Music Rewind, a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host, Steve Apple and in each episode I will invite a guest on to tell us about their favorite music album, how they discovered it and what makes it special to them. Today on Music Rewind, we are bringing you something a little bit different. A special bonus episode featuring some previous guests as we discuss classic rock. First up is Alan Ziegler from our discussion of Band on the Run. Hello, fellow self proclaimed classic rock experts. Take it easy on me and let's have fun with this. Next up is Doug Brinkler from our episode on Van Halen. One present. Glad to be here. Let's rock this. Finishing up our roundtable is Luke Boris whose episode on RadioHeads in Rainbows may or may not have posted yet, depending on when this one hits the airwaves. Not classic rock. Hello, it's good to be back. Looking forward to this one. Welcome, gentlemen, and thank you for joining us today. So it goes. You knew that was coming. Come on, tell me you didn't know that was coming. Have you listened to it yet, though? That's nice. You know what, I did and I enjoyed it. I really enjoyed it. It has some really cool ebbs and flows to it. To me, in listening to all these podcasts, I have gone back so far with the exception fan of the opera one because I just listened that the other day. I haven't had a chance to, but I've went and listened to the albums that have been on here and I think I really rediscovered the beauty of these albums. And then listening to the people's stories for me and how they connect, it gives me a whole different perspective on all the types of music. I mean the DMX, the Lauren Hill and the Phantom, those are way out of my league. Those are way too smart for me. I don't normally listen to that stuff, but when I go back and listen to it, I mean a totally different appreciation for it. Yeah, that's what I was going to say. I appreciate it because that was a music I normally listen to back when some of those albums were popular. But also when I was a kid, I liked the Star Wars album, which was the John Williams orgAS area and I really appreciated Thin. And then I heard Van Halen and it was all over. Yeah, it was all over from that. But I still have that John Williams album and there's two songs on it that are pretty much worn out. That's how long I listen to. I listen to the whole album, but there's two. If someone brought the greatest hits of John Williams to the table, I would do that album in a heartbeat. We just watched Home Alone yesterday and that's a great John Williams one. And you hear Harry Potter in there, and then if you get you get into Jurassic Park, obviously, Star Wars, so many. I mean, that's the master right there. Yeah, it was great. So what we will be doing this evening is each member of our group of classic rock scholars has a few questions, and one by one, we will be asking our questions and then either praising or mocking our colleagues on their musical taste. So we have all nominated Luke to go first with his lead off question. What you got for us, Luke? Well, actually, that's you. When I first found out I was going to be on this episode, what is considered classic rock, so we discussed it and decided, hey, this might be a good kickoff question. So when I was growing up in the 90s, classic rock was kind of considered sixty s, seventy s, bit of the so on. But it's now 2021, and if you subtract 30 years from that, it's 1991. So is Grunge now classic rock. So I guess we need to determine what classic means to each of us. Well, I think the criteria I actually think that you do make a valid point of being the 30 years, because I wrote on my thing that it's a song that stands the test of time or stands out, or you listen to it on the radio and you turn it up, even though the song may be 30 years old. If it's good music, it's good music and it's eternal. For me, it would be classic music, would be The Who, Boston, and we can keep going up the years. But I think what it is is it's got to be stand the test of time. Even the 50s do Whoop music, there's a couple of those that really stand the test of time, and I could jam to those in my convertible best as I could, songs from the two thousands. To me, I think anything that derives from the blues or R amp, B type songs can be considered classic or classic rock. In saying that, I think you can span any amount of time. I mean, I look at a band now, like, I was thinking like the Dirty Knobs right now. To me, that's classic rock, and that's out. When that come out? Last year, 20 20, 20 19 maybe. Now, I don't know. But a band like that, it has that classic rock feel to me. And I would consider that you could play that on any classic rock station. You can make that argument. To me, the decades themselves are key in identifying classic rock. Like, if you mentioned recent bands, I could see the Black keys being right there. They could have come out in the they would have fit right in. Yeah, they pulled it out. That blue genre. To me, classic rock was largely developed in my mind, number one by my dad and Allen with their influence, but then also 100.9 Wlrz right there.


Participant #1:

I don't think it exists anymore wlrz as it was, but I don't know. But to me it was when you get into the end of the 50s, early sixty s and then right up until Grunge. Grunge was the end of classic rock to me. So all the good rock of the personally do put that into a classic rock bucket. I don't even know if there was good rock in the 80s. There absolutely was. I was going to say there was a lot of stuff in the 80s that I would not consider. It cannot all be considered classic rock because there was some real crap. I mean, Tom Petty was 80s, though. Yeah, there was some real crap out there that I listened to now and Go. It did not age well at all. You've got like Van Halen. Yeah. The Cars, phil Collins. You too. Alan mentioned Tom Petty, which is a good point because does it follow the artist too? Because Tom Petty had some great tracks in the 90s, which was after Grunch came out from Full Moon Fever and Wall Flowers. He had some great tracks in the 70s toopedoes. The Traveling Will Berries. You have Roy Orbison. Oh my gosh, man. I would consider all that classic rock, but then kind of like kind of bridges that a little bleed over, I guess. And when Tom Petty came out, he was labeled in that post punk new wave category forever too. And then somewhere along the way it just evolved into MTV videos of them were kind of new wave, you know what I mean? Yeah. And then later on it went to almost like on the new wave side, you'll get bands like the Talking Heads. What bucket do you put them in? Same thing. Yeah, they started out on that new wave, now they're classic rocket. Yeah, they started out CBGB with Blondie and the Ramones. That's another one here them on classic rock stations now, too. I personally like the Ramones and I would think some of their stuff is classic. Some people like it's. Punk. I listen to it now and it seems slightly slower than it did when it came out, but I would call it classic now. I got another question. So, singersongwriters, you've always given me crap about my love for singersongwriters. Al Call Simon. I get everybody crap by everybody. You are selfproclaimed music snob I don't remember this, but wasn't it George Carlin who said he might stole this off somebody too? I don't even know. But he said something like, good music is what you listen to and bad music is everything else. Yeah. So, I mean, it's all you, right? Everything you like is good. Everything that you don't like, or else you'd be listening for sure. Most of our answers though, are going to be in that sixty s. Seventy s. Eighty s timeframe. Absolutely. We can argue classic rock definition. We could do that for days and probably never come out. Seriously. I can tell by the answers it's not going to get resolved in an hour. Let's move on to another question. Alan, give us one of yours. This should be fairly straightforward. What was everybody's first concert? Oh, first concert? Yeah. Yeah. I mean, not like going to a church or something like that. Like an actual yeah. I saw Johnny Cash at the Pure Shrine mosque in the early 70s because I was probably twelve and it was really good. That's awesome. It was exciting to see that there was no fireworks or anything, but that was one of those guys that I think he didn't actually have to sing. He could just talk and it just sounded good. His voice is kind of like if Morgan Freeman did Raining Blood. I'd buy that album. Let's get with Carrie King and Morgan Freeman. I want to hear that. I would have loved to have seen that concert. Yeah, anytime. I wish I could have seen Johnny Cash at any point in his career. Yeah, it was really good. And his wife was there and then his mother in law and stuff, and they were really good. I'm glad my dad spent the money. It was probably $7 back then. Your dad took you? Yeah. I grew up in a household of country and western music, but Johnny Cash, I think, succeeds all genres of music. I do find it funny that our first question off of what is classic rock happens to be a country western artist. Yeah, well, you know what you listen to cocaine, blues. You got to remember that he toured with Elvis and Lewis and Royal. Yeah, exactly. There was a Rocky. I would have loved to have seen that particular can you imagine being at Sun Records at that time, seeing all the greats? I think the devil was sitting outside taking souls before the guys walked in. I mean, that was the place that just was busting out albums. Every one of those guys were considered classic, for sure. I'll say off of the country music. So here's one for you to feel the fire. I guess my first concert was Billy Ray Cyrus. Oh, boy. I was five years old and my mom dragged me because she wanted to go with her friends. Is that a clear memory? No, I don't remember a darn thing about it. But my first classic rock artist that I saw was George Thorogood and the Destroyers. Oh, that would be awesome. With my dad at a little shack in East Bureau, Illinois, no one came. It was almost embarrassing. I felt bad for George, but my dad and I stayed a little bit back. But we could have walked up and high fived any of the band members. But it was a fantastic they still just completely rocked out, knowing that there was no one there. And they were basically in the middle of central Illinois, no one around. They still gave it their all, and it was fantastic. My first rock concert would have been van Halen. So a pretty good first concert. And it was definitely way louder than Johnny cash. That was back when insurance companies and stuff didn't care if people's ears bled and people lost hearing. How about you, Alan? My first one was September 9. I saw Greg Ken open up for Rick Springfield. So that's not really classic rock either. Right, ken.


Participant #1:

I've got tons of Greg Ken on vinyl. My dad was a fan, so I got into the classic rock. The video was great. You know what was great about that?


Participant #1:

I was like a month or so into being a freshman, and my uncle Kevin eflee was he took me to that, and it was like 75% female to 25% male. And it was very fun. I'll just say it was very fun being a freshman. Yeah, it was cool. So that was the only good part. I was going to say rick Springfield probably brought in a lot of women because he was on soap operas. I think it was super. General hospital. I think he was on general hospital. Yeah. All right, Doug, what's your first question? Well, mine was steve, I got you next. My first concert was Metallica, about a month before I shipped out to the army. I was 18, up at pecatonica fairgrounds in Illinois. Yeah. What else was I this was right after load, and they came out and they said, oh, they're already on the deal. They came out and they said, sorry for the fans of our recent stuff, but we feel like playing old shit. Yeah. And the crowd went nuts. And it was all old stuff. A couple their hits offload, sure. But it was great, though. The opening form were days of the new and Jerry Cantrell nice. Oh, yeah, I've seen Jerry cantrell. He's awesome. That's a heck of a line up. It was a hell of a first concert because I was 18, and within an hour, the beer garden fence had been torn down. So beer was flowing freely throughout the whole place. They oversold it. So there were cars all the way down the highway. People didn't get in. We went early to see the opening acts, but there were a lot of people that didn't get in at all, including my cousin Chris. He could hear it. He didn't get in there. It was a great start. I saw metallica on a monsters of rock tour. I think it was 89. With van Halen. No, this was van Halen metallica docking and somebody else. But metallica came on, like, second, and as soon as metallica came on, the fence surrounding the thing was tore down. I mean, they just trampled the fence and everybody started going towards the stage. It was a crazy scene. And then speaking of that, pekatonica, I saw metallica there when they were on la Lapalooza. And yeah, that was a good show. That was a good show. The only problem that fairground is one way in and one way out took forever. I'm glad we went in early. Cool place, though. Go for it. Doug, what's your first question? Oh, my first question was what's your favorite album? I'll have you go through there because I want to hear what you guys say first. I want to add a caveat. Favorite album that you have not covered on the podcast. That's correct. Yes. Well, there is a correct answer to this question. There is. Quadraphenia is the greatest album of all time. I love rock operas, so 20 112 and The Walls, et cetera. But Quadrafenia does it for me. I think 20 112 is awesome. The Wall is another awesome album. Those were good picks that you picked there to build off of luke there. My pick is Tommy. Oh, my gosh. That's another great one. I had seen the movie many times growing up, which I'm glad I did because when I eventually listened to the full album you all ever see the movie Almost Famous? Yes. At the beginning, the older sister leaves them a note says, listen to Tommy with a candle on it'll. Change your life. I did that and I actually not with a candle on, but went out there and I bought the CD. And having seen the movie, I understood the entire album and it was fantastic. And it is still one that I just listened to all the way through all the time. That's a great one. Yeah. Keith Moon and Janet Whistles are absolutely phenomenal. And Pete Thompson one of the greatest songwriters out there in my opinion, obviously. But sure. He's making a lot more money than he did then by all these shows, snippeting his music for the intros. He's living off CSI royalties now. Oh, my God, he definitely is. Yeah. How about you, Alan? No, I'm going off of my favorite album is what I always listen to the most. It's either Sound Garden, bad Motor Finger or Smoke from Driving in Crime. And I listen to those, like, all the time. You bought me Bad mortar finger for Christmas a few years back. I'm vinyl, I should say. I've known it since I was young. But you got me the reissue and I'd still listen to that to this day. And I got the CD on that one, so that's awesome. Yeah. What I did for me, I put, what's your favorite album? And I started thinking because I like ZZ Tops eliminator, but there's one song on that was TV Dinners. And so that kind of took it out of my favorite album. And this one is Appetite for Destruction by Guns and Roses because the guys had so much attitude that I can listen to that album. And even at my age now, I can crank the album. It's a fantastic album. Yeah. I still like every song. A lot of times things get overplayed and I think for a little bit some of the stuff got overplayed but then now they don't play this much. So now I can listen through the whole album all the way. There's a lot of great tracks that are not popular hits out there, like Mr. Brownstone and others. I mean, there's one of my favorites in 1987 I was in Daytona, Florida for I think it was a Pepsi 400 or something before the Coca Cola 500. But there I'm trying to think of Daytona Beach. The boardwalk had it on there. Yeah, the Boardwalk had the bar in the middle of the pier there. And I hear the band, I go in there and obnoxiously loud and I couldn't even tell if they could play or not. And I noticed what was written on a little chalkboard, guns and Roses. And I thought, Guns and Roses does have nothing to do with each other. I like, this is stupid. But I do remember going in and seeing the top hat on slash and this is years before they got famous, but I listened to one song but you couldn't even understand the words or anything. And I'm all about loud, but that was obnoxiously not well mixed. You couldn't understand what anybody is saying. I'm like, I thought these guys kind of suck, you know what I mean? And then years later I would have died to have a ticket to see them back in their heyday. But I'm going to take the next question here. What is your favorite long track? Like over ten minutes long. Go ahead, Al. I was just going to say, I think for me it's probably Funeral for a Friend, Love Lies Bleeding, Elton John. Here we go. The other ones I had was either Low Spark or High Heeled voice from Traffic I think is really cool. Slow Beginning and then closer. I'm Your Captain from Grand Funk. I thought that's another one of favorites. I really wanted to say the Abbey Road medley, but I thought that was cheating because that's really considered one track. Is that allowable alex Judge, having now watched that Beatles documentary, I'm going to say no, but it is a great messy oh, I love it. I listen to it. I still listen to it like every other week. I listen to that thing. What's yours, Loop? I went with Pink Floyd Pig. Three different ones is the perfect balance of the Pink Floyd sound and Roger Water's kind of theatrics that final cut in the wall, obviously. So I think it's got the conceptual elements. And then my favorite era of Floyd is Metal to Animals. I think that's where they kind of develop their sound to my ears, to my liking. So anyway, bass line is phenomenal in that song. The cowbell, the pig noises, that kind of alludes to the album title. Animals is their peak to me. And then into the Wall. Those two are right there at the peak for me. And Pigs is just a phenomenal song, which in a future episode of the podcast, we'll be spoken about in deep detail. But I love the anger that comes out in those lyrics and also the so much imagery in the entire story of that album. And Pigs is Roger Waters that is most angry. I love it. Absolutely. Haha sharad you are. Gilmore's guitar solo at the end. Like I said, it's just a culmination of that sound that they found and then you could tell they're kind of getting into that theatrical rock opera mode on that album. But it's the perfect mix of the two. Yeah, there's a couple of parts in there that you can tell where the wall came from. Absolutely. Yes. What's yours, Steve, on that? What was yours? Mine is The Almond Brothers, the live version of In Memory of Elizabeth Reid off their album at Filmore East. Yeah, I consider that one. It's about 13 minutes and it's just a fantastic instrumental. Kicks the shit out of the studio version. Right? I can't believe nobody thought of this, too. Mine is Free Bird, Leonard skinnerd. I mean, that's been used in so many different movies. And just sitting by a fire cooking marshmallows. I mean, Freebird was freaking just a really good song. And it's just over ten minutes. Like ten minutes and 9 seconds. I also like Rush 20 112. That's much longer. And then I do have a liking for Iron Maiden, and they have The Ancient Mariner, which is over 13 minutes long. And it's actually poetry with music. And I don't know if people really listen to Iron Maiden like I do, but the artwork and stuff with Eddie on the cover and all that stuff makes people believe that the music is different than what they actually play. Don't get me wrong. I mean, they play some rock and stuff, but they also can get mellow and play some Iron Man quite a bit in this podcast, just in the side conversations. I need to check them out a little more and hear more than just their known songs. I need to dive into them a bit. I'm in the same boat, never giving them a shot. This episode isn't live yet, but my episode with Tommy Wood doing Kiss Destroyer. We talk about Iron Maiden quite a bit. And apparently they got new stuff really recently. Yeah, it just came out. I like two of the songs. When you're a fan, you're looking for something. And for that album, there's two songs that I like and that doesn't pose well because most of the albums I like more than that. Everyone like I said, that ZZ Top Eliminator. There was one song on that that I was like, but if I'm going to a car show, I dropped the top and I throw in some ZZ Top. They just really had that hot rod thing with the Eliminator car and stuff. Like that. And they had a lot of classic songs on ZZ Tucker. As a quick story, which involves Allen at my cousin's sorry. My uncle's wedding in the mid eighty s. I was real pissed off. I was a grumpy little, like, five, six year old, and I was uncomfortable and didn't want to be there. But then along comes down, he's like, every girl's crazy about a sharp dressed man. There you go.


Participant #1:

Oh, my gosh. I have the picture of you sitting on my lap. You're asleep. The wedding. Oh, my gosh.


Participant #1:

Wow. That's crazy. Going to take us to another question there, Alice.


Participant #1:

Let me see. What was the first album you bought? Any album like, what did you buy with your own money? Not like you got for a birthday present or something. So my first CD purchase with my own money was a deal because I actually spent my money and I got my first stereo for my room with a little five dischanger. So I got five CDs with it, one big bulk purchase. And it was Tupac's first album. Right? Very classic rock. Dr. Dre the Chronic, very classic rock, common thread, which was Songs of the Eagles by country artists. Not a bad album, I remember, but I'll finish strong here. Queen, a Night at the Opera. Yeah, that's good. And Eagles Hotel California. That's good, too. Put those five in there, hit shuffle and it would take a while, but I get an interesting playlist. So a couple of those classic rock ones canceled out the other ones, so you're okay? Yeah, I'd probably put it on repeat a lot, but just giving you a crap. My first one was Beetles Revolver, and I got cut grass and stuff like that. And neighbor had a garage sale and his older brother had some record albums there. I bought that and I enjoyed the Beatles. Now, I do remember the first 45 I bought, and that was Rolling Stones Honky Tonk Woman. And it had a barfly on the front of the chick at the end of the bar or whatever. And my mom says, are you sure this is the 45 you want to buy? And I said, Yeah, Mum, because I had cowbell in the sun. And my mom was thrilled. She's like, Oh, boy. She said, okay, it was my money, and I actually bought that. Hockey talk, mom. Country and western, come on. Yeah, that's right. I think my 1st 45 was little TNA from the Stones and then wasn't She So Cold? On the flip side, I think I think that was my 1st 45. I don't remember. I didn't even know. And I like, she's so cold, jen? I can't remember exactly, but I like to say that it was Kiss Lovegun and I bought two at the same time with my own money. But I think it was actually the album from the Bee Gees called Spirits Having Flown. That's classic. Yeah, classic. It has a song, Tragedy, and then Too Much Heaven was also on that album. Okay. Was that after the death of their brother? It was before then. Yeah, because I remember before that, it was right after the Saturday Fever stuff. Have you heard the recent album by the DGs doing Allies, too? Yes, I did hear one of the songs. They do a great version of Tragedy, which is really good, and you should be dancing. And a couple of others. That was hilarious. Just awesome. Is that where they I love the fact that the Foo Fighters are at a place now where they can do whatever the hell they want for fun. Yeah, they did those Jewish they got a horror movie coming out. What is it? Album six. Six. I'm looking forward to that. Or Studio 66. Dave Grill can do I think everybody loves him, you know what I mean? He's like the Keanu Reeves. Everybody just loves the guys. What about you, Luke? Well, my first album was Elena Jagged Little Pill. You know what? That was very popular. I mean,


Participant #1:

my formative years of music. Hey, I will own that album till the day I die. I still listen to it. It's fantastic. That CD wound up in my car, but I have no idea how it got there. Sure. Okay. It was in my car. I don't know where Peter Frampton live. Everybody had a copy of it. Yeah, they mailed them out to everybody just to make the sales look good. Everybody got stuffed in their mailbox. What was it? Was it Weezer that had the if you installed something on your computer, the Weezer video automatically came on or installed Windows 98 or something like that that was automatically downloaded. Remember, you, too had that Verizon thing. Oh, yeah. That was a horrible album. It pissed me off. Why is this you two album? I'm like, exactly. Yeah. Now, that was the first album that I bought with my own money. Now, my dad was in the Columbia House, so ten CDs for a penny. Oh, my gosh. He's still in it. 30 something years. You never get out of it. My first tape cassette, classic rock, was Meatloaf Bat Out of Hell II. That was my first one, even though it wasn't my own money. I got it with number two. I don't even know if I've heard all I have to go back and listen to that on which one? Number Two. Bad out of Hell. Number two? Yes. Oh, yeah. I don't even remember it. It's a good one. I'll do anything for love but I won't do that. What is that? And Steinman, he just passed away last year, I think, that guy, he did a lot of movie background music and stuff, too. But Steinman was the writer of all the Meatloaf stuff. Back to the Columbia House thing, I had a story about that. So my Uncle Kevin was in the club, and they kept sending them stuff and they kept charging them, charging them. So then my Aunt Linda worked as a secretary or something at a legal office, and he had to have her get the stationary or something from the legal office to send the Columbia House to get them to finally stop charging him for these albums. Oh, I know. It was crazy. I had BMG for a while. It's the same thing as Columbia House. That helped me build my early CD collection. My vital collection was inherited from my dad. Inherited it means when I moved to Georgia, I took it. Sorry, dad. Where's it? I don't know. That's where I got, like, say, my first Pink Floyd album and the two Beatles greatest hits, the Red and the Blue ones. I got those. Yeah. Several others. Yeah. That's cool. Luke, what you got for a question? Which classic rock band has the best rhythm section? And there is also a correct answer for this question. Yeah, I think he already answered it. I know what the correct answer is. And I put The Who. There you go. Yeah, that's correct. Those guys just work together. Keith Moon was definitely sporadic in his drumming and stuff. I was going to say Keith Moon and constant rhythm don't come to mind. I mean, it's amazing. Well, I call it adding something, because if something was missing, he added it. And there was times where the recorders, they would be in the studio, they'd be playing something and they're like, what is this? What is this noise here? And they isolated it with the Michael Jazz. Yeah, he added something that would be out of a four time, he would add something and it was just a little bit extra. My favorite extra is when he screams. So if you listen to quadrupedia, you can hear him going in the background. He's getting so into the drum. That's what I love about him. He's just the energy. It's absolutely amazing. There wasn't any album. Some John Bonham stuff. You could hear him growl. He's growling. You can hear him growling while he's drumming. He's like running. He's hitting him so hard. He really was insane. And it could have been the drugs in the album. It makes me think of Uncle Ernie. Yeah. I think in order to define the best rhythm section, you got to define the criteria, though. John Net Whistle is the best bass player ever. Alan, I kind of have to go with Luke on this. I'm going to throw something out there. I have two answers, because my first go to I didn't think might not be considered classic rock, but it's The Meters. Yeah, the Meters. So they're a funk band out of New Orleans with the Metal Brothers. They played, like, with Dr. John, a lot of album. Their main golden period, you had Zegu modules on drums and George Porter Jr. On base, and they were fantastic. But that skirting the boundaries of classic, right? George Porter Jr. Played with he's played with everybody. From my actual answer, though, I did go with Cream with Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce. Oh, yeah, that's the second Cream. Ginger Baker is awesome. Well, what about I mean, if you're just going like, solid rocked in group. What about Charlie Watson, Bill Wynon? Those guys with Locked? Yeah. I don't know if it's a sacrilege, but I never got into the Rolling Stones ever. I don't own a single vinyl record.


Participant #1:

Yeah. You know what we talked about Iron Maiden and Steve Harris on the base and Nico is his name, like Nico something. Yeah, nico. Those guys together, you got to listen to it. What about Mick Fleawood and John MCV? I mean, they play with the John Mail and the Blue Bridge played on the song Whirls of London. I mean, they played on a bunch of stuff, obviously flee with Max stuff. When you look at it. Once they hit their stride with rumors and stuff, not so much. But their early stuff, I would say. Absolutely. They're in there. They were truly blues. Yeah. Well, on my favorite album, actually, I had some Fleetwood Mac on there and I was going to try to blow you guys off and I was going to go a different direction of what you guys thought. And then I'm like, fleetwood Mac is a controversial probably pick on anything depending on their error. For sure. They've reinvented themselves at least four times. For sure. Well, and to go back to yours, what you said with Rolling Stones, same thing. I love Rolling Stones. They're great. Especially when you go back and you see their evolution from the early stuff to whatever they put out over the years. Yeah. They had so many different deviations from the standard just rock through line. That's what makes them really interesting to dive into all those deviations. It wasn't like a steady decline, a steady incline. It was just they changed all over the place, really. They even had some disco styles in there. Some girls album, disco getty Lee and Neil Perry. Oh, yeah, think of that. That was another one that passed my thought process, too, because Neil Perk was one man army and then throw Getty lead plus singing on top of it. It's really good. I put Roger Taylor and John Deacon on my list, too, as possible. I mean, that's some funky white guy base right there. English dude. That's weird, right? Some white guy from England can play like that funky bass line they got another one Bites the Dust and a bunch of those they bought a lot of the blues albums from America and the Beatles will tell you that's what they did. And Cream and all these other ones were like, they're just doing the blues and doing it putting their English stink on it. And then they brought it back to the United States. And like we mentioned before, we start recording, I have a new appreciation for Paul and Ringo. Watching Get Back and seeing those two work together, trying different ideas like get a different bass guitar, watching that recording process, that's pretty fascinating. And seeing them work together to get the rhythm of the song while they're just vocalizing lyrics that don't exist yet, all just to the rhythm of the bass and drums. That's pretty cool. Yeah, it's crazy. That documentary is highly recommended. Can't wait to see how it ends.


Participant #1:

I don't know. Spoiler. I'm not going to spoil it for you. What is a popular band or song that you always turn off something that to you is tired or overplayed or overrated? Proud Mary from Queens. Jesus. I'm so just thinking about it right now. I want to reach you there and grab somebody's throat right now. That's how much I'm so sick of that song. It is a good song, but there are so many other no, it's not. It's not even better creed in songs out there, definitely. Oh, my gosh, I had some other ones on my list, too, that you guys are probably going to want to reach through and grab my throat. I put these maybe not like American Pie and in the God of David. I'm so sick of that shit.


Participant #1:

I thought everybody's long song is going to be inegada Davida, but I don't care for that. Inegada DA Vita is not like the other long tracks we mentioned. Inegada Davida. You got to be invested. Like, I'm going to sit and listen to Integrative because it's almost like homework. I had the album that it was on, but that was I thought the ones you guys might hate me for is like Hotel California. I get bored. I get bored. I fast forward to it's.


Participant #1:

That's still a great track. When you hear it off of their live album is even better. And then I'll even throw out the acoustic version on Hell Freezes Over. I like that one. Sometimes it's a mood. Well, I love that whole album of Led Zeppelin. I love the whole album. But in Puria, they would have top 500 every year during the Indy 500, brace was that Memorial Day weekend or whatever. And Stairway to Heaven seemed to be always number one. And I mean, for a time there, that was well, you know what, I'm going to let you in on a little radio magic since I was in the biz there, as they say. Sure. That countdown is all bullshit. Yeah. Do you think DJs actually did some sort of tally? Like 1234? No, there's no way, dude. There's no computers. I'm sorry, I burst your bubble. There would just be the DJ's list. Or is this the radio station's list? Yeah, it was the programmer. Yeah, whoever was just doing the music. Oh, well, I do remember one year was it Bonnie Ray, no need a Hero? What was that song? Linda Carlo. Yeah. Bonnie Tyler. Bonnie Tyler. Yeah. That was number one year. And I thought, no, it was. And I said, Shoot me. I'm like, no, but it was the year that that came out. Okay, well, that programmer must have got, like, fired right before or knew he was going to get there, going because Stairway to Heaven got second place. And I'm going, No, Tyler's people must have contacted the station. She was probably coming to town and sell tickets. That could have been she was playing the local fair that weekend. Yeah. Who I put was you two, to me, is such an overrated band. The guitar playing, what was that? They did the rockumentary thing with Paige and Jack White and The Edge. So I'm sitting there watching that and I'm thinking, one thing is not like the others. He did that, you know what I mean? And that thing really sucked because it never got loud. You know what I mean? I'm sitting there waiting for this, hey, man, these guys are going to come out. I think the title was it might


Participant #1:

what would have been perfect is if Eddie Van Halen busted in, wrapped out Eruption right on the whole thing and the credits roll. You know what, I meant to never really resonated with me. I mean, a couple of decent singles here and there, but they just haven't really I never got into them. You know what? Bono does good to the world. He uses his fame, that's great. But musically and just completely, totally overrated. I think The Edge is held with such esteem because he came up with a sound. It doesn't necessarily have to be technical. That goes back to Ringo. He played with Feel. He wasn't a technical drummer. I think the sound is the same over and over. It is, yes. But he had that. That was his he created that. Yes, but it's not like AC DC the same. There is a YouTube documentary out there called I think it's Rattling Home. And there's a couple of scenes in there where they're like playing in a subway and it's just them jamming. That's not bad. I mean, when they're jamming and stuff and just playing stripped down feeling off of each other. Yeah, that's good. I'd be okay entertained for that. But man know, and they've been around since 1976. They're definitely classic rocks, so I know a lot of people wouldn't, you know, ALS was around in 1976, Weird Alankovich, and he sold four albums and has five Grammy nominations. And then he plays all types of different music. He rap and rock and 50s do up. He doesn't play the same old thing. Yeah, his band is fantastic. I've seen him several times and just the wide sprout of genres that they have to play. They're great. They are really good. Yes. John, we actually got into a pretty deep conversation about Weird Al in my episode. Yeah, we did, actually.


Participant #1:

Yeah. That's awesome. I'm going to throw a band and a song out there that I always turn off. I can't just can't listen. But the band is Super Tramp. Come on, man. Which one? Super Tramp comes on the radio. No, I can't stand them. I cannot stand they had tramp. They had two songs that were undeniably cool. I love the song. Undeniably cool when they definitely came out. What I have to do is listen to it again now to see if it stands to test the time. But I can remember at a time there a lot of people had breakfast in America. I never hear logical again. That's not the song, though. My song is Sweet Home Alabama. I never want to hear again. That's sacrilegious. I live in the south, too, and I can definitely see that getting to be erased from history. It's just your favorite long track wasn't freebird. I mean, you got to listen to that too much. Freebird is great, actually on Freebird, I remember asking my dad when I was younger, dad, I've never heard freebird. Do you have that


Participant #1:

forward to get to it? Because it's a goddess. Yeah. What about you? So my answer the sad thing is I own a majority of their albums on vinyl because my dad was an uber fan. I will turn off anything by are you a Speed Wagon.


Participant #1:

Keep on Loving, you can't Fight this feeling anymore


Participant #1:

champagne, right? No. Gary from east. Okay. Got you. One of my favorite albums would be the Rock and Roll. It was almost like a Best of explains so much of why they were always played. I think that's why I don't like I'm not saying they're a bad man. I will give them credit. They're phenomenal band. But the songs you listed do suck. Those were


Participant #1:

back high infidelity backwards. Yeah.


Participant #1:

They heard it from a friend who heard it from a friend. That's them, right? Yeah. That was getting closer to the used to have a ten speed bicycle with a little luggage track on the front of it and I had a boombox attached into it and decade of Rock and Roll. I have it on vinyl. That was a great I did have those vinyls, but for some reason they didn't make it to Georgia. The Best of Bread. So I didn't feel that. Oh, my gosh. That was another album that a lot of people had in their house was Best of Bread. It was crazy how many they sold those out. They mailed those out. It was Columbia house, man. I'm telling you, that was like the freebie. They were just trying to get rid of them. Peter Franklin Live was another one that I saw a lot of people had at their house. I'm like, man, I think another one is Soaked Degrees from Bosque Eggs. Oh, yeah, that's another one. Everybody, it seems like in their collection has that they have the Lido shuffle on there. Yes. There you go. I love that song. I love it. I love the bass. Oh, my gosh. Okay, I think we covered that one. Did everyone get theirs in? I'd like to thank you for listening to part one of our classic rock roundtable. The first bonus episode for the show, part Two, will be released in a few weeks after our next regularly scheduled Monday episode. For those that cannot wait, part two is already up on our patreon, along with several future episodes. More round tables are being organized. What topics would you like us to cover? More round tables are being organized. What topics would you like to see us cover? Please let us know on social media, our website, or plain old email. We'd love to hear from you. So again, thank you for listening to Music Rewind, a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. As I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time,


Participant #1:

a podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. Back to you anchors.





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