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90s Music Roundtable - Part 2 - Transcript


https://bit.ly/90s_Part_Deux

Music Rewind welcomes three previous guests to participate in a 90s Music Roundtable. This is another in our Roundtable series discussing various music topics.


Panel:

Michael Boroski - S1-EP 5; Pearl Jam-Vs: https://bit.ly/PJ_Vs

Danny Prokup - S1-EP 10; Sunny Day Real Estate-Diary: https://bit.ly/SDRE_Diary

Dom Brown - S1-EP 4; DMX-It’s Dark and Hell is Hot: https://bit.ly/DMX_Ruff_Ryders

Stephen Epley - Host/Moderator/All Around Great Guy


Transcript as follows: Participant #1:

Hello, and welcome to season two of Music Rewind, a podcast where we look to tell the stories behind our favorite albums. I'm your host, Steve Epley, and in each episode I will invite a guest on them to tell us about their favorite music album, how they discovered it, and what makes it special to them. We now join our regularly scheduled program already in progress.


Participant #1:

Well, let's go on to one of Danny's questions. What should we hit us up with? Guys, I have a feeling for your second question, we're probably going to have the same answer. Yeah, we kind of already talked about it. Well, let me do the third one. All right. What was the way so obviously now you can be exposed to new music everywhere, TV ads, it's literally everywhere. But how did you find out primarily growing up, how did you find out about bands and albums, and do you think the way that you found out about them impacted what you considered good or bad music? And I'll go for it, so a lot of it was sort of finding it from everywhere, but we had 120 Minutes TV wraps, you had the radio. Sometimes you would be lucky enough to hear or find something, somebody would give it to you, but it was pretty much all the same places, and I think it had a huge impact of good or bad. Because I think for me, anything that was played on 120 Minutes, I'd be like, Oh, this is good. And then you'd listen to it a little bit more like, oh, this is really bad. They had one good single, or it all sounds the same. This is a terrible question, Steve. I thought for sure we are going to have the same answer, just you and I walking around, Disc Jockey, MusicLand, looking at the album covers and going, oh, this looks interesting. Let's go with that. Remember Michael? No. Remember the Kajanski Brothers? I had that band, Rosemary, the cover band. That's the first time that I heard Hey Jealousy by the Gin Blossoms. That's the first time I heard Nearly Lost You by the Screaming Trees is because they had those two songs in their set when we went down to the carnival and our parents let us go see a rock band at twelve. Right. At the Beer Garden. That was at the Beer Garden, and it was an all ages show, and I think we were just about not even all age to be in all ages show. No, I want to say that I was like 13 or twelve. It had to be around there because Nearly Lost You would have been 92, right? 93, yeah. And the Gym Blossoms for sure. That was 95. I guess maybe it wasn't the first time, I don't know. Can I take this question back, Steve? Can you edit this one out? No, I've got my answer yet, too. So yes, we would have been twelve or 13. So for me, though, I didn't get MTV until I moved to Lad in 1990, and it was like, eye opening, so many different things. And I don't know if you remember, but in the early 90s, MTV had rock blocks or music blocks that they did. So you'd get like four or five R, amp, b or rap once you'd get four or five pop ones and then the rock ones. And that's where I started to learn that there was more bands out there than just what my parents were playing. So that was like the first half of the 90s for me. And then after that, the aforementioned Hanks Garage. Hanks Garage was a cornucopia of different music styles, of what people would bring in and play. You'd have Mike putting Pearl Jam on. You'd have Chris Hank bringing in radiohead. You had Gary Nass bringing in Anthrax or something. I mean, you had all kinds of different stuff. Kyle was big into Ozzy. But then in the middle of all that, we had Oasis playing nonstop. We had all kinds of different music in there. And, well, overall, it was Smashing Pumpkins. That was probably the biggest of it all. But with that particular garage, every weekend, just music, we're just put on different CDs. And being the 15 year old music critics that we were saying, what's good or bad? I would say, for me, it was like the magazines. We'd go to the news and Boost or the Prune mall. Like to like the book store. Yeah. And then just grab all the alternative nation and spin. And the late 90s was like, blender. But I would read the articles and even now, reading music blogs and stuff when it comes up and it's like, hey, check these records out. And then that's how I would find a lot of stuff. Or it would be honestly, a lot of times it was just luck. Somebody would be like, hey, man, do you see these guys? Be like, no, let's check them out. Or Tommy Jeffson would show up and be like, oh, Vogue got this new band we got to check out from Springfield, man, they're really cool. And then next thing you know, you're listening to all this different stuff, and a lot of it had to do with peers and who you hung out with. I feel like I didn't have an older brother. So Tommy Jefferson was kind of like my older brother when it came to music and stuff like that him and which is funny. Marissa's older brother Jason, they would bring in some music that we never really heard of, and the only way you could get that is like having older people tell you what was cool and not even what was cool. But, hey, check this out. I remember Tommy brought in Buffalo Tom. I would have never heard a band called Buffalo Tom without Tommy talking about them. Or like, when you got to college, too, especially at the end of the 90s, it was people in your dorms and stuff that you would talk to and just get different perspectives from people of what they really liked. I mean, I would bring some stuff. People would be like, what the hell is this? And I'm like, Oh, sorry. She said bastard music to that. Same thing with my last two years of the 90s was in the barracks. Yeah, so that was a completely change of pace as far as from the Illinois Valley with because for some reason, everybody has to have their barracks door open and play their music as loud as possible because everybody else does need to hear it. So that's what you're walking down and you'll hear DMX over here. You'll hear some random country shit over here, and the one guy that plays Turn the Page from Metallica on repeat all day. That could have been another song I don't need to hear again. The barracks was a great place to kind of discover new music that a lot of us had missed the past year and a half because we were literally out of the loop with basic and our training that we just couldn't there was no radio or nothing. So you get your permanent duty stations, like, what is this girl in a schoolgirl outfit dancing? Is this music? Now, that's interesting. Can we mute it? But it looks like dance back. But that's where I first heard, like, DMX and stuff and all those other stuff that was just not played in the Illinois Valley. Two things that you both brought up is not only word of mouth, and I think that was kind of cool about growing up for at least three of us on the growing up in a small town where you kind of float between you had folks listening to this, and they would turn you onto a band, and then you would go, Mike, you mentioned Tommy Jepson, and he was big into the Brit Pot stuff. Buffalo Tom is one of my favorites. And then Steve, you'd mentioned Hank's Garage, and Gary Nas is like, you've got to listen to a new megadeth record, okay? I thought they were an 80s man. You're like, no, countdown to Extinction is a fantastic record. And then folks turning me onto James addiction and things. But also something that you had mentioned, Michael, about music magazines, I think was huge, too, is because not only if a band was reviewed, but then if you found your artist that you liked. And I know that's been said to death, but if Cobain would mention somebody, I was instantly trying to figure out, oh, I got to get this record. And that lasted for a long time for me, too. And it's still to this day, when you read something about a musician that you like or is inspired and they mentioned an album, you go back. I think the first time I ever heard of. My Morning Jacket Dave Girl had one of their T shirts on and one of their videos, and that's 2000s. But it was something like, oh, that immediately stuck with me. Like, if it's cool enough for him to wear the T shirt, I've got to figure it out. Yeah. Tom, are you back with us? I am, gents. I am so sorry about that. No problem, man. Current question is, how did you find out or hear about new bands or music in the man word of mouth? Word of mouth. 100% word of mouth. MTV, really? The music channels, whether it be MTV, I feel like VH One was out, but we really didn't have to listen to it that often. But it certainly was something that wasn't happening. Yeah, I think, too, going back to MTV has been mentioned, but especially when they had their show, like, you get to that middle 90s or even early 90s, you've got not only just you had mentioned Rock Box Steve before, but you've got your own TV reps. You've got 120 minutes. You've got Hair Bangers Ball, Headbangers Ball. At one point, it was like Hair Bangers Ball, though those were the first nirvana was on Headbanger's Ball, famously, Kurt Warra prom dress because it was a ball. He was wearing a ball gown to the ball. But then not only that would just mainstream videos all day that they would play, and it was no. So you'd be like, Oh, that's a cool video. I need to check that out. And then other people were talking about it because you're all watching the same thing. So that was a huge thing. I think we're sort of the tail end of that because obviously we know what MTV is now and what it turned out to be. But I think word of mouth and MTV is huge. Yeah, we were just up in Lake Geneva and the hotel had MTV Classic, which I don't have, and we had it on Sunday, like night, and it was like how MTV was on Sunday. It was like all these rock blocks and like, you were saying Steve and rap blocks and then sure enough, Dan at like 10:00 or 11:00, it was 120 Minutes started, and it was like an old episode of 120 minutes. And I think that's one of the things. I know the kids today, they got, like, TikTok and YouTube and all that stuff, but just to have that one source, it really did make you want to go find out about different music and different bands and, like, albums and stuff. I think it's a missed opportunity for MTV these days because people will argue, oh, well, you can get that on YouTube. You can get that on Vimeo or TikTok or whatever. But it's from an educational standpoint where you've got those shows that are playing music and talking to the artists of the genres that you are learning and starting to enjoy, whether it's Headbangers Ball or Yo, MTV Raps or Alternative Nation, you're getting all that information like, oh, well, Dave Grow was on there. He mentioned the Screaming Trees. Okay, I want to learn about them now. You're not going to get that on TikTok. No. The only way you get stuff about new music is like, honestly, it's like Blurbs or podcasts or you have to go seek like, the music blogs anymore. The mid two thousand s. And later, probably in the mid two thousand and ten s, the music blogs were so big, like Pitchfork and the robot one, I can never think of it. But now if you want to go find that, you have to remember to go online and look at that and then hope that you because there's just so much information now. It's almost like an overload that people are getting. That's why it's hard. Like having Apple music. It's like when I was a kid, you have to save up or you have to try to scam BMG or Columbia for out of CDs. Never.


Participant #1:

Like now it's almost like it's too much. A lot of times I'll just sit there and be like, I don't know what to play because there's so much I think what we lose, too, is and we're sounding like old guys, but it is a 90s podcast. What's lost, though, is there's no Zeitgeist anymore. And before it would be, oh, this video is going to be in rotation, or they're going to be interviewed in this magazine and it's going to be there for a while. And you have time to spend with that album or that single or that band and everyone sort of seeing it together, where now, even on a music blog, if you read it, okay, this record is coming out. It's talked to death or talked about before it's released. By the time it's released, it's already old and they're sort of like, oh well, we're moving on. Now you're like, wait, what? I'm just, I know that's a generational thing. But I mean, even MTV had like the spotlight. Things like Buzzworthy videos, flagpole Sita or hey man, Nice Shot from Filter. I mean, songs like that. Okay, that was a great song and it was highlighted. I want to hear more. Yeah. And then you got to those two records and you're like, yes, on the Harvey Danger album. I'll fight for that song. That's a good song. I have one other thing, too. Do you guys remember The Box? The Box? No. Yeah, it was like a music channel. The only reason why I remember is I remember my buddy, they had it with those little black box cable boxes, whatever. You're the ones that got all the channels and stuff. And it was like a premium service and it was where you could go in and make the video request songs. And it's called The Box. And it was like pop, rock, country, whatever, and you can just call in, and you would basically be able to the users will call in to vote, and that's how they would pick the next song they would play. That sounds amazing. Really? Yeah. The only box I knew was I think my dad got in trouble for it, like, in the 80s because he had one of those black boxes, and the cable guy comes in and he goes, oh, sir, did you know that you're getting all this stuff for free? Goes, I knew those kids were messing around with something. He blamed it on his children, who were like six and seven years old, that we somehow figured out how to install, like, a black box to the TV crappy little first grader using wrenches to tie in the coaxial. All right, well, let's move on to another question. Dom, do you want to ask one of yours? Yeah, absolutely. So I've been kind of out there for a little while, so I guess the next question I'll ask you guys is what's your favorite song to listen to outside of genres that you kind of normally listen to? And so, for me, I guess I'll answer the question first. For me, one of my all time favorites is in the inbound Lincoln's Park, by far one of my most. I just love that song. You have just the diversity of Chester on the vocals. You got Michaeloda with the lyrics and the RnB or RNBC and the vocals. Of course, you got the breakdown with the board, just the metal and everything kind of just coming in all at once. And for me, it was something song that I just resonated with, honestly. It's a song I listened to growing up for any type of sport event, whether it be basketball, football, track or whatever. That song was one of the ones to get you a little pumped up and get you ready to go kick ass. Yeah, that song and that whole album, fantastic in the end. One of the best tracks on that whole album, no doubt there. I will say this if you want to get technical, it was written in,


Participant #1:

but the album came out in 2000. You know what? You might be right there. The only reason I know is because I've just been flipping through my Excel document, and this calls for a spreadsheet. Oh, my gosh. This is why I'm in finance. I'll allow it. Super. Dorky I'll allow it because it is a fantastic album. No. And you know what? I had to double check it because I was like, man, I thought that was 99. But I'm pretty sure I bet those singles came out like how you kind of place things in your life. You soundtrack your own life there with you listen. And that was a barracks album for me that was played heavily in the barracks. And in 2000, I moved out of the barracks. So as I remember hearing that going in and out of different rooms over the weekends. Yeah, that's why I would place that in 99. So officially, it was recorded in 99, and the single was released October 9, 2001. Oh, shoot. Wow. Because that album was in 2000. That's insane. For sure. Well,


Participant #1:

as long as you didn't say, like, oh, man, it was definitely Rolling by Limp Biscuit. That's 27 years ago anyway, so it's hard to remember. Yeah. Oh, it's definitely safe. So I'll put the question to Mike. Mike, what do you think? What would you say is your 190 song cross genre that just kind of sticks with you to this day? Mine would have to be It Was a Good Day by Ice Cube.


Participant #1:

And what makes it even greater now is, like, the fact that somebody did the work to figure out what day it was. Oh, really? Yeah. They figured out, like, the Lakers beat the supersonic on this day. The good Year would have been, like, in La around this time, and they did it. It's, like, February something like 1991 or something. It's so ridiculous. It's really funny. But the one thing that on MTV and all that stuff and on the radio, you never heard the end of it. When the song is done and on the actual version, he says, what the hell am I talking about this for? Like, this is stupid. I got to go. I like, Cubes, man, I got to go kick someone's ass. Yeah, that's a good one, Ma'am. I sat you with my dad's Trevor song and picture me at the time of seven year old kid hearing your dad just bust all these rhymes and recite word for word Ice Cube lyrics. That's awesome. It definitely made some good memories. For sure. Even to the day when the song comes on the radio, I start wrapping it. My wife, she starts rapping it. I'm pretty sure the kids start looking at, like, a crazy book. There'll be a point in time where I hope they'll appreciate how great a song that was. Oh, yeah, that's great. I have a friend of mine that when he goes to the casinos, when he's throwing crafts, right before he throws the dice, he says, Back door, Little Joe. Like, every time he throws the dice, every time. This is like this five foot six, like, white guys just yelling, Back door, Little Joe. Nowadays you'll have people looking as Ice Cube. The actor. That guy. The actor in those family movies. That guy. Are we there yet? Oh, you should listen to his first couple of records. They're not so family friendly. I mean, I tease a cop now, right? Is that right? Yeah, for many years now. Come on. I think he's been longer than a cap killer because he's been on, what, su for, like, 15 years now. Longer than that. That's an understatement. You're right. Brought it out. Longer. Heck, it lasts longer than the main stars. That's right. I'm going to take my answer for this one. And I'm trying to take myself out of the podcast because with my podcast, I've discovered a lot of songs that I've listened to a lot lately that are outside my genre but going back for the decades. It's Tupac Hail Mary. Okay, nice. It's just a fun song to crank up and listen to, and it's always in my playlist. I feel like I know this is going to be split decision for the biggie versus Tupac conversation later. Maybe. A lot of Tupac love going on because he's the more talented about that a little bit later. Yeah,


Participant #1:

I looked at this a little bit differently. It was a great question. Not necessarily genre, I guess rock is my alternative, is my genre, but something that I listen to a lot, like 90 hip hop is something I listened to a lot. But song that I keep going back to that's not one of the more popular ones, is Mob Deep Shook Ones part two. I don't know if anybody knows Mob Deep, a fantastic record out called the Infamous back in the 90s. So a buddy of mine, his brother John Stats, would do skateboarding competitions and stuff and head out east, and he'd always come back with mixed cassettes of stuff that people were listening to out there. And it was all like East Coast rap. But the first time I heard, like, outcast Luna's Wutang Clan and this song by Mob Deep was on one of his mixes. And it's just a fantastic song. I recommend checking it out, but it's got a great lyric that says, ain't no such thing as halfway crooks. Come on. That's poetry right there. Absolutely. That's a song I keep going back to a lot. It's been on numerous playlists, and it's always close, near and dear to my heart. Well, it's funny because you mentioned that, right. If you guys sing 8 Miles, that was one of the songs that I was going to say on 8 Miles, that was one of the songs that was featured. All right, I'm going to go to a fun one here. What is your favorite one? Hit Wonder. Go for it, Danny. My favorite? I'll take it right on top of my list here. There is no better one hit wonder than Super Drag. Who Sucked out the Feeling. Yeah, that's a good one. Is just trash. Terrible. So bad. Where'd you go now that everybody knows it really is. And Steve, it's 100% in the list, man, from that year. Such a good song. They were a bonner, too. They sucked. It was like 40 minutes of nothing, and then they ended with Who Sucked Out The Feeling? And everybody went nuts. Yeah. I got to go with four non blondes. What's up? Oh, yeah, definitely. Linda Perry has gone on. She's won Grammys for road songs for Brittany, Christina and you name it. But that song in terms of a one hit wonder. It's so weird. It was instantly catch on song. Yeah. I think the whole thing is a sing along, right. And it's real, hey, what's going on? Over and over again. But just when you think about a catchy tune that sticks in your head that sounds as good today as it did back then, it's sort of the definition for me. The one hit wonder, she has such a unique voice that it fit the song. But I couldn't tell you another song that they sing at all. I mean, completely one hit. I can tell you other songs that she wrote. Yeah, I know. She's a great songwriter. She's probably had more of those than anything, right? Yeah. So this Hanson umpot, been taken. I can't because we're talking about it today. We talked about sellout real big fashion was always about that. And then, honestly, it has to be the Harvey Danger like flagpoles. I took them off my list because I like the record, but I'm a nerd. I tried to like that record a lot more. The other one I was like, but I don't think as much people know it is bandidos. The refreshments. They are fantastic band because that song but you never saw anything else from them. Creature's daughter. Come on. Don't question me about ninety s one hit wonders, man. My alternate was the Proclaimers. I'm going to be 500. I wonder if it could have just been like, what is the crappy pop song that you really liked that didn't really bother you that much? We got here from Don yet. Don, what's your favorite one hit wonder? Do we lose you, Don? Well, before Don comes in, I'll say my other alternates were Stay from Lisa Lowe and Nine Stories. You know what another great soundtrack? The Reality Bites soundtrack. Soundtrack is really good. Yes. Stay. This is what I mean. Like pop songs that you still kind of enjoy. I just got a text from Dom Lost Connection, but his one hit wonder is Color Me Bad. I Want to Sex You Up. That's great. Girl, you make me feel there's so many. They're like dishwala counting blue cards. Tell me all your thoughts on God. We are missing the one we talked about earlier, though. But over text grooves in the Heart OOH delight. Bootsy Collins.


Participant #1:

Yes. There's so many of those songs, too, that sort of there's a ton in the 90s. So many. And you're like, yes, this song is a banger. How bizarre. No. Torn by Natalie and Bruglia. Yeah, that's a good one. Come on. There's so many of those. Jonas if God was one of US I dropped out. Did we talk about getting knocked down and get up again? Just mentioned something. That was it. My bluetooth went out of my earbuds, so I missed like a couple of minutes. Walking in Memphis. Walking in Memphis, yes. Life is a highway. Tom Cochrane I know rapid flats that I hate with it, but come on. I mentioned in a text message earlier, so when I worked at the Uptown as a prep cook, there was a head cook that every time he was on shift, he had two songs that he put in. He had two cassette singles. He played one after another. One was Havazar, the other one was tub thumping. And he would just love those two songs, played them over and over and over again. How about Unbelievable by EMF and then Jesus Jones? You can't mention EMF or without Jesus. Jesus Jones. Right here, right now. How about the New Radicals? Yeah, that was just on the 90s playlist with Everything About You by Ugly Kid Joe. They had two hits. Or was there another one? Yeah, that was a cover, though. It was a cover. There's a good song on the end of that record called Mr. Record man from Ugly Kid Joe that I recommend. Believe it or not, it's the only one I used to listen to all the time. It's an acoustic little bit song that's pretty good. Pretend You're Dead by l Seven. Yes. They're not a one hit wonder. Come on. Do you remember the song Slam from Onyx? I used to rap it at lunch all the time. Lee would beg me to ask him, let the boys be boys. I was going to say Technatronic, but they had multiple hits. There you go. Yeah, it was like 91. It was on the markie. Mark considered a one hit wonder. Yeah, his brother has more hits than him. Remember Snap? I've Got the Power? Who the hell was that delight today that we were talking about? Grooves in the heart. Yeah, that's where you dropped out. Sorry. There you go. That narrows it in. Sorry.


Participant #1:

Yeah. Biking. That stuff was coming up. Marquis definitely, too. That was a great one. That's a great he just passed, too. Yeah. That was a big loss. All right, Danny, take us to another question. All right. You're a promoter. You've got a 90s nostalgia concert. You've got three bands. Okay. Yeah. You narrow it down to three now. My list just keeps going. I've got a list.


Participant #1:

Five vans. Five vans. Rock Never Stops Tour over here. Who's on your list? Five bands. You're the promoter. Five bands, five acts. Who's on your list? Michael will start with you. Wait, are we talking, like, the bands in their 90s prime here? Yeah, you're seeing the 90s version of that band. So we're talking 90s axle. Not today's. Like Fat Axle. You can say, I want to see GNR. Use your Illusion, guns and Roses. All right, if you want to get specific. But, yes, you're seeing them in their 90s. Heyday, all right. Obviously you're Van and Pearl Jam. Then I would say, like, Biggie Tribe Called Quest. And then this is just cheese, because then I get a six band in some garden because then I could get Temple the Dog


Participant #1:

Cheat Code. Hey, we tried. We also get Buster Rhymes, too, right. So that means I get, like, seven bands on mine. Sandy is going to work in some Sunny Day foo Fighters Magic here. Now, there I was just going to say ghetto, except I was going to add Wutang Clan to my list of Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Biggie and Wutang would be a hell of a top four. Because if you want to talk about all these solo records and all the stuff that Wutang has, I mean, we could just go on from there. Yeah, I wouldn't mind seeing Sunny Day. I mean, I know they're coming back, but in the got to give a shout out to that, right? Yeah. I guess you can't really pick five bands, can you? Or ten. I have to stop myself. I'm like I'll just do, like, ten. What I was thinking is bands that would put on, like, you know it's going to be a good show, right. I mean, Nirvana is all time. Like, if we're of this generation and you're in rock music, it'd be like growing up in the missing out on Zeppelin. Right. You wanted to see him live when they were all together, but, yeah. Think he's got to be on there. I know. Dan. We definitely know how this conversation is going. Yeah. I don't know if you're on or not, if you want. So if you're a promoter and you have five in your set list, you got to go Biggie, you got to go Tupac, you got to go Nirvana. I would say, for me, oh, Jonasy, from RnB perspective, was amazing. And then Nirvana for sure, it's a good set of they couldn't hear you for some reason. So to recap, here is you had Tupac, you had Biggie Jodisi, nirvana, who is the fifth one? Oh, Wutang. Wu Tang. Okay. I knew I liked Tom. Yeah, because you can see he's talking, but I can't hear him. Yeah, I heard him loud and clear. You did? He's going to hear this episode and go, what the fuck are those bands? I didn't pick any of those. Steve Carrie for 7 hours. What the Color Me Bad, the ugliest boy group of all time. Boy bank group. Color Me Bad. One guy was good looking than that thing. All right, so I got Guns and Roses, Tupac, Beastie Boys, Pearl Jam and Oasis. Oasis? Yeah, Oasis. If I could see them in Isle White Festival or like Manchester, like in the mid, early 90s would have been that's why I asked. 90s prime. Eric yeah. That'd be good to see. So, 90s prime. We're counting GNR in 90s prime. What in Harris? Steve use your illusion. One and Two, I think are fantastic albums. No, I know. I guess that are fluff. I would rather see them, like, 80, 89 after Appetite comes out in 87. But I got you. Yeah, I really love a lot of the songs off those albums. Remember Rain, obviously, Civil War and others. And I don't know where it lies in


Participant #1:

yeah, Lies is like 88. Yeah, something along those lines. Yeah. You Could Be Mine. I mean, that's rocking the video alone with the Terminator. Edward Furlong. Yeah. All right. Great videos. Honestly. You could have a three hour podcast just talking about radio videothead and just commentate on the videos when they come up. One of my favorite videos just to touch on that is because we talked about Tribe early, but Tribe Conquest scenario. It's such a fun video to watch nowadays because it's all like win Amp graphics on it like old 90s Windows music player. It's hilarious. Bus Arrives is in there. That's great. It's such a great idea. It's a great song. Great album. Go ahead, Dan. Don. I was saying Tribe Call Quest is a very underrated band for sure. They're definitely one I'd like to listen to more. I need someone to bring one of their albums to the table, like their best one that I can have a reason to dive into it. All right, Dong, give us another question. So the question is, I guess my final one was what were you all thought, I guess growing up in the 90s, obviously on the East Coast versus West Coast rap beef, what did it mean to you? What was your idea and perception on that was weird because live, growing up in the Midwest, no one cared, really, because there wasn't like a lot of rappers from Chicago at the time or like Midwest rappers that were as big as the two guys. And I think at least even like the guys that were really into rap, like at the high school. I think I always liked both sides anyways. For the most part. It wasn't a big thing. Personally, I like Dreide. Snoop, but then I like Biggie more than I like Tuva. You know what I mean? It's like back and forth of the fact that those guys were like, had issues with each other and wanted to do all that. It was like, whoa. I think the main perception in the Midwest was that at least in the rural Midwest where we grew up was that it was basically not really an act, but just kind of part of their personas. Right, right. It was just their beefing. It's not anything serious. This isn't something that's going to come to gunfire. Like, what the hell? Thought it was just basic Beetles versus Rolling Stones level of rivalry. Sure, why not? And what influenced me more on it was that Tupac more had the backing of Dr. Dre and Snoop in that crew versus Biggie had Mason, Puff Daddy. And that's a very narrow minded approach to it, but that's the visibility I had on it at the time. I didn't know any others. And because of all that, Tupac and the West Coast just seemed to have better music to me, and that's how I approach it. Yeah, I think the biggest thing is not realizing the seriousness of it, because I think you kind of grew up in the 90s. There was always Axelroads and Kirk Obane yelling at each other or getting in a fight at the MTV Music Awards, or somebody saying something disparaging about another artist, at least to me, that's what this East Coast West Coast thing is, not realizing the literally deadly seriousness of it. And it was never you can't listen to West Coast if you like, East Coast, like you guys were saying. It was just sort of I liked it all. The Chronic is one of the greatest albums of the 90s, if not ever, period. So it's ready to die by a biggie so I think not knowing, I guess, or not having the awareness because it wasn't sort of or maybe it was just the way going back the way that it was sort of the information was given to us. It was coming through maybe music magazines, just as some of those other so called feuds were being fed to us. So it didn't have that heightened seriousness, or at least at the time I didn't realize it until obviously things went down. What was your take on it, Don? Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear your perspectives, especially, Mike, you kind of shared your perspective from it, the Midwest perspective, and not really having a dog in the fight per se. It's kind of interesting to hear you share your thoughts on it. I think it was me and Danny kind of alluded to it as well. Very unfortunate. And it was very at the time, we didn't think it was as serious as it was, and then obviously two lives were lost. It really kind of opened everyone's eyes as to really how serious it was, and it was unfortunate. I mean, it was just terrible. And when you think about it, especially now, you listen to the crap that's on the radio now, we really lost two savant in the game to really something that was just foolish, even guys who were friends at one point. So it was just really sad. For part of the Beef, I lived in the East Coast. The other part of The Beef, I lived in the West Coast, so it was kind of different. It's interesting to see how both sides kind of view the dispute as well. So there's a lot of complexity in people's thoughts on how they felt about one artist versus the other. And it really just shows, like, how Americans typically will side with whoever is near and dear to them or closest to them, as opposed to who might be right or who might be wrong in this situation. Yeah, that pretty much sums it up. It's definitely interesting to hear all the different perspectives from each coast, danny, you're just looking at each other like, yeah, that sounds like a great thing. I know. That's what it was his question. I wanted to hear his answer. I guess I'll have to wait till release day. Yeah, Don, they can't hear you. But Don gave a very eloquent description of having lived on the East Coast and West Coast. Yeah, so weird. Yeah, you got to wait until it comes out. Yeah. I don't know what's going on. I can hear you just fine. All right, so since Dom is stable where he's at now, he missed out on just questions two through ten. Not a big deal to anybody that makes it this far in the actual podcast episode. I thank you very much. But we're going to backtrack a little bit. Don, what bander album didn't click with you in the 90s that you grew appreciate later in life? Oh, gosh, I'm Saintirvana, the first album. I can't even tell you the title of the album because, again, I wasn't a huge fan of it growing up. Bleach.


Participant #1:

Mike, is that Bleach their first album? Yeah. Never Mind. He probably didn't even know that Bleach is a record. Let's see here. You might be right. No, it was Never Mind. To be fair, I tried to listen to Bleach and I didn't really like it too much.


Participant #1:

Bleach came out actually 89, I think.


Participant #1:

87? Really? Wow. Yeah. Never Mind for sure. Yeah, never Mind, for sure. Partly because it wasn't what I knew. I was seven years old when it came out. Right? And seven years old, completely different background growing up. Right. Again, my mom and dad had listened to rock growing up. They listened to blues, R, amp, B, and my dad hip hop and stuff like that. So Compunction and cameo. And the Gap Band was his my dad's era of music. Right. So I wasn't exposed to it. And you hear that the guitar comes in on Smells Like Teen Spirit, and you're like, Oh, wait a second. Even though this is not what I'm normally used to, listening to, this shit kind of sounds good. This is kind of jamming here a little bit. And you start bobbing your head, and then all of a sudden, everything just comes in. The percussion, the symbols crashing. You're like, Damn, I'm finding myself almost like I'm having a headbanger's ball over here, and this isn't what I'm used to. You start going through the album listening to the lyrics and the vocals and the context of what Cobain was talking about, and you're like, this is some really deep shit, and this is really compelling and really good music. And I didn't appreciate that until I think I really start listening to Irvana. Probably, I guess, was had to be in the 2000s or probably, like, right around the high school area, 2001 for me, I would say that album, I would say by far, that would be one of it. And I know it's kind of like a lazy way of doing it because, oh, it's a popular album, popular band. But for me, being from a different culture, that one just kind of stepped. I think you missed out on the underappreciated album or song. Did you get that one? Yeah, I think I was trying to answer it and that's when I started having all the issues. Okay, so underappreciated album I'm going to go with for my most underappreciated album, I'm going to stay true to my roots, but I'm going to go R and B. And this was actually an album from a soundtrack for a movie. And it's a completely I mean, one would say for a macho guy, me is kind of soft. Will say this, but I'm going to go with it. There's a movie in the mid 90s waiting to excel, started Whitney Houston, a bunch of other actresses, like Sean, a couple of other actresses or whatever. But anyways, that album, amazing album. You're talking about some of the best R Amp B singers of the era, of the generation. We need Houston, Tony Braxton, Brandy, Monica, and they all put out some really high quality songs, I believe maybe two or three of them, chart top number one. And it was really good R Amp B music, really good music. And the movie was kind of cheesy. But that album there, it was some really good R Amp B ballads there, especially from the album, actually, Mary J. Oblige. Oh, my God, almost missed that song. Not going to Cry by Mary J. Oblige. Greatest. I put that on that Lenny Williams because I Love You, like that stratosphere of begging and not actually begging, but just being a woman scorn or just kind of just sharing just raw emotion. And that song she conveyed in there, she conveyed those thoughts on that so much. So when the scene happens in the movie, you hear that song. And now, when I hear the song today, I immediately get that vision of the movie when that scene happened, where the husband leaves the wife and everything and it just takes him right back to that moment. So that album was classic. I want to say that I know Brandy and Monica had a song together on that album, too, which is really good, too. So that album there was that Boy's Mind. I think The Boy's Mind was on that album. I heard that today when I was doing some research. Yeah, actually, you know what, that wasn't on there, but they did both of them had songs on an album, though, that were really solid. I had to pull the track listing to kind of run. I remember the movie being out there and the soundtrack being pretty heavily popular at the time. But I haven't seen the movie. It wasn't like Bodyguard. Well, just going to mention, though, but you guys were talking, not joking before, but we were talking about Mariah Carey before. And when you had just mentioned Whitney Houston being on that record. You talk about somebody I know maybe your mind goes to her 80s stuff. When you talk about the Bodyguard soundtrack, waiting to exhale when you talk about all time 90, like peak of her powers. Some people go to the 80s, but man, that 90s when she was just crushing it, especially with the Bodyguard soundtrack. And I Always Love You and Mary Julie right around when she did the national anthem at the Super Bowl. That's what took way to Houston from like obviously she was always super famous and super popular. But once that happened, obviously she was singing, I think, Dolly partner. That was her song originally, right? Yeah. We Always Love You. And so when that happened, I mean, it brought in a lot of country fans. They were like, wow, this girl from really singing. And hell, some cases, people like the song better than Dolly did. It's crazy is that Dolly's been on if I'm remembering correctly, she's on record saying that her version, Whitney's version, was just somewhere she didn't even think the song could go. After the heights she didn't even think it could go. And just like, her relationship with that song has changed so much because of Whitney's version of it. But there's a song that was everywhere. I had the cassette single. I think my sister had the CD single. It was just one of those songs that were just yeah, my sister had the soundtracks and she would blast those. I Have Nothing was another great track off there.


Participant #1:

You're talking about Whitney and that does remind me of shit. Never mind. Come back to me. I totally forgot what I was going to say. Well, to transition off that one, what was your most overplayed album or song? Most overplayed song from the Catch You Up, Danny said Smells Like Teen Spirit. There's a lot of context that's missing there. It's one of my favorite songs. Ivana is one of my favorite fans of all time, if not my favorite man of all time. So it was one of those I equated it to a song like Stay Away to Heaven from Led Zeppelin or one of those songs that I don't necessarily need to hear again because it's a part of my DNA. Just to catch you up on that. I know, right?


Participant #1:

You know what? I'm going to go with the biggie saw easily one of the greatest rappers of all time. But if I didn't hear the song with it I'm hearing the song in my head right now, but I can't think of the name title. Oh, more money, more problems. Yeah, I'm with you. Amazing song. But if I didn't hear it again, I would be okay. I wouldn't be too distraught. That just makes me think of, say, Puff Daddy and Mace flashing like, Rolexes into camera and the video and stuff with the jumpsuits. Yeah, it would have been nice to see especially when you talk about ninety s and early 2000s hip hop. You had Hype Williams, who's one of the best music directors from a hip hop perspective, at least. I think he was the one who did that buster Rhymes and Janet Jackson, because it cost like several million dollars or whatever. But if you would have had him doing some production and videos for The Bad Boy, it really would kind of change your perception on them. But unfortunately, you didn't. You had Puffy control and everything, and it was god awfully cheesy. It was a post on Instagram. It had one of the worst outfits from Nike music videos and the red Nike leather suit and that he and Mace were in that outfit. It was like a red Nike jacket and a red Atrocious. Oh, man. With Missy Elliott trash bag from her. Yeah. What was going on with that? Do you know those blow up dinosaur costumes now that people wear the fan in the back? Did she have the fan in the back? Is that what's going on? She was a pioneer. She was a pioneer. She forgive us some of the best weird out videos ever. This is true. Yeah. Tonight's weird elf career, more than anything else, did when he parodied that instead of Puffed out of Mace at him and Drew Carey. Yeah, that was great. That stuff was hilarious. Yeah. Steve, I remember now what I was going to say when you're talking about Whitney, about like, that's their song now. I always think of Trent Rezner when he talks about her and 19 Nails, and he's like, once Johnny Cast did that, it's like his song now. It's not mine anymore. But you can reedit that to make that kind of tie back in a little no, I get what you're saying. 90 snails is something that we haven't even touched on. I've got three pages. I haven't mentioned anything. I wanted to. I'm babbling like an idiot over here. One of the best band logos ever. Simple but effective. Loved it. Nice. You see it on a shirt, kid. You're like, what the hell is that? I could have gone with Lost Highway for the compilation. Oh, Lost Highway is good. Yeah. Dan, you mentioned the Crow album earlier. It's a soundtrack that really resonated with you. The movie was so dark and everything, and I felt like I don't know if there was a central composer for the soundtrack or whatever, but my God, they were on it. They were spot on. The album match. The movie dark. It was serious, obviously. It just fit the era. Honestly, I think without that movie, you might not have seen rock kind of alternative music kind of take the stage in which it did in mainstream. Interesting. I think that movie really made it like, hey, it kind of shined the spotlight on because it was there. But then you're like, Oh, it's on the big screen. And you had Brandon Lee, and then there was a controversy, obviously. He passed away with filming and everything. It was just so much going on with it. And then the great music and the movie was actually or 90s movie was pretty good at the time. Obviously, now you watch a good school Cheesy, but it worked. It really works. I think what you just mentioned, though, about the music matching the movie so well is a great point. And I think, too, because it's based off a comic, I think they did a great job with sort of bringing the atmosphere of the comic into it. But then that soundtrack, you're right, because it pulls together and just the variety of artists on it. You've got Nine Inch Nails and then you've got The Cure, who at that time are sort of that early 90s. They're sort of over their peak a little bit. Stone Temple Pilots are on it. I think Ministry has a song. It's sort of that industrial, but it's like you said, bleak and atmospheric as well. And the way they use those songs in the movie, too. Did you have a song on the album, too? No. Pantera. Okay. Pantera, which I should say Violent Femmes. Rage was on there, too.


Participant #1:

You think about the bands you named


Participant #1:

Rage. I mean, these are all bands that, if they're not already in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, they're certainly going to get their name out here really soon. Well, and that was pretty much the lineup of the first few. Lala Loses Too is that album and some of those other bands that we've been talking about. So you think about we've sort of a theme that's been running through the episode of sort of all these different genres coming together, and you think about, oh, I'm going to see we said it before, but I'm going to see Body Count and not Inch Nails because there's no or I'm going to see Ice Cube or Wutang and then Pearl Jam, because in your mind, it's all coming together at the same time. There wasn't that huge divide that I think there has been in some other areas, I guess. But another way to bring that to life was sort of the soundtracks, and the curators who passed that on to us, I think is pretty defining, like you said. Absolutely.


Participant #1:

I'd like to thank you for listening to this part of our 90s music roundtable. The full three hour episode is already up on our patreon, otherwise the next part will be out in a few weeks. What music topics should we cover in future bonus episodes? Let us know on our socials. Thanks again for listening. And as I always say, listen to the full album. Until next time,


Participant #1:

A podcast from the Sidereal Media Group. Back to you. Anchors.


https://musicrewind.podbean.com/e/bonus-90-s-music-roundtable-part-2/





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